Summer 2022 Courses

Course Descriptions

115.02, 30853 ONLINE, Mikati - Summer II (July 12 - August 10)
Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.03, 30723 MTWRF 8:30-12:00, Boucher - Maymester (May 16 - June 03)
Pre-Modern History: Imagining and Describing the Edge of the Known World. This course will survey the history of various societies from Antiquity to 1492.  While the material will help you develop a basic understanding of the pre-modern world and its history, the course will focus on the following question: How did various societies at the time imagine and describe regions located on their geographic periphery? As this class will show, pre-modern descriptions of distant lands often reveal more about the societies that produced them than about the places they intended to describe.  Whether they were Ancient Greek poets or Medieval Irish monks, for instance, authors injected in these descriptions the values, anxieties, and fantasies that were common in their cultures of origin. As such, these texts provide revealing insights about past societies and the only means to appreciate them is to understand them in the historical and cultural context in which they were written.

115.04, 30731 ONLINE, Mikati - Summer I (June 07 - July 07)
Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

116.01, 30620 MTWRF 8:30-12:00 & ONLINE, Slater - Maymester (May 16 - June 03)
Gender, Race, and Sexualities in the Modern West. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of women, gender, race, and sexualities in relation to the rise of the Enlightenment and ideas of equity. The focus will be on gendered and racial liberties. Studying the various roles of women and their relationships to men provide a unique lens through which to understand the application of Enlightenment philosophy on Europe and North America.  The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage questions related to politics, society, culture, the arts, and war, as well as the history of modern sexualities. This class is intersectional, so we will also be addressing issues of class and race consistently. There will be graphic and sensitive material.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.

116.02, 30621 ONLINE, Ingram - Summer I (June 07 - July 07)
The U.S. and the World in the American Century. Why did American automaker Henry Ford spend millions to build a town in the Amazon rainforest? How did the U.S. and the Soviet Union go from being allies to enemies in the span of just a few short years? What was African decolonization and how can it help us to better understand the U.S.'s role in the Vietnam War? Each week in this course, we will tackle questions like these. Using lectures, books, archival materials, and active discussion sessions, we'll learn to think critically about the U.S.'s role as a global power from the late nineteenth century to the present.

116.03, 30747 ONLINE, Steere-Williams - Summer I (June 07 - July 07)
Epidemics and Revolutions: Disease in Modern Society. In this introductory course we will ask the fascinating historical question of how the social experience and cultural understanding of disease has shaped modern global history. We will explore how both chronic and infectious diseases have played a fundamental role in the development of modern modes of governance, public health, modern technologies, and a global economy. We will also examine how disease illuminates social attitudes about class, race, and colonialism in the period from the Enlightenment to the present. Using diverse examples such as cholera outbreaks in Europe, bubonic plague in India, syphilis in Africa, yellow fever in North America and the Caribbean, and HIV/AIDS across the globe, this course demonstrates that the historical analysis of disease is integral to understanding both ‘modernity’ and ‘globalization’.

116.04, 30777 ONLINE, Ingram - Summer II (July 12 - August 10)
The U.S. and the World in the American Century. Why did American automaker Henry Ford spend millions to build a town in the Amazon rainforest? How did the U.S. and the Soviet Union go from being allies to enemies in the span of just a few short years? What was African decolonization and how can it help us to better understand the U.S.'s role in the Vietnam War? Each week in this course, we will tackle questions like these. Using lectures, books, archival materials, and active discussion sessions, we'll learn to think critically about the U.S.'s role as a global power from the late nineteenth century to the present.

116.05, 31383 ONLINE, Ingram - Maymester (May 16 - June 03)
The U.S. and the World in the American Century. Why did American automaker Henry Ford spend millions to build a town in the Amazon rainforest? How did the U.S. and the Soviet Union go from being allies to enemies in the span of just a few short years? What was African decolonization and how can it help us to better understand the U.S.'s role in the Vietnam War? Each week in this course, we will tackle questions like these. Using lectures, books, archival materials, and active discussion sessions, we'll learn to think critically about the U.S.'s role as a global power from the late nineteenth century to the present.

210.01, 30899 MTWRF 8:30-12:00, Poole - Maymester (May 16 - June 03)
Terror in the Aisles: The Horror Film and 20th Century America. What frightened audiences about Frankenstein in 1931 when most don't find it the least bit frightening now? Did Jaws help American's forget Vietnam? What does 9/11 have to do with zombie film? Would Get Out have been so popular without the Black Lives Matter movement? This class examines 20th c. American history and horror films by thinking about how such movies intersect with a variety of America traditions, folklore and ideas about monsters. Students are to think critically about these films as primary historical sources and what they reveal about key events, cultural ideologies and moral panics in the American historical experience.

229.01, 31238 MTWRF 10:00-11:45 & ONLINE, Slater - Summer I (June 07 - July 07)
History of Queer America, 1600-2000. Reflecting on the continual evolution of queer identities, spaces, and performances, this course offers an exploration into the history of American queer communities and change over time. Beginning with exploration in the seventeenth century and ending in the present day, this class underscores the ways in which queer identities and politics emerged from issues surrounding class, gender, medicine, literature, art, industrialization, race, political movements, and religions. This will also be a class about contested spaces and evolving language, related notions of categorization, and otherness.  

241.02, 31295 STUDY ABROAD, Olejniczak - Summer I (June 07 - July 07)
Special Topics: Great Britain and Europe since 1914. 
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241.03, 31309 STUDY ABROAD, Delay - Summer I (June 07 - July 07)
Special Topics: History of Women in Ireland. 
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