Spring 2022 Courses

Course Descriptions

104.01, 20736 TR 8-9:15, Crosby
World History from 1500 CE to Present. History 104 will cover world history from 1500 CE to the present, and covers the chief political, social, economic, cultural, and religious developments in that period. The objectives of the course are to examine the interaction between different cultures with differing worldviews, globalization (the increasing interconnection between economies, societies, and their ideas), and the effects of industrialization, modernization, imperialism, decolonization, and their consequences, and the effects of the two world war.

115.01, 20316 TR 9:25-10:40, Mikati
Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.02, 20317 TR 10:50-12:05, Mikati
Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.03, 20319 TR 8-9:15, Jones
Religion, Race, and the Making of the West. Religious violence and toleration were pressing concerns in the Middle Ages, just as they are today.  In this course, we will explore how medieval conceptions of religion and rights were tied to emerging ideas about nation and race in the development of European Christendom and its internal and external boundaries, laying the foundations for long-term discussions about human rights in the modern world.  The course will begin with examples of conflict and coexistence between Jews, Muslims, and Christians from the Roman Empire to the Middle Ages, and continue through the eventual consolidation of political rule and the fracturing of Latin Christendom in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries,  Topics include the development of medieval European society, changes in labor and slavery, the Crusades, heresy and conversion, the idea of race in the Middle Ages, the Inquisition, the European expulsions of Muslims and Jews, Black Africans in Europe, and the debates over the natural rights and self-determination of indigenous peoples and slaves in the New World. 

115.04, 20320 TR 9:25-10:40, Jones
Religion, Race, and the Making of the West. Religious violence and toleration were pressing concerns in the Middle Ages, just as they are today.  In this course, we will explore how medieval conceptions of religion and rights were tied to emerging ideas about nation and race in the development of European Christendom and its internal and external boundaries, laying the foundations for long-term discussions about human rights in the modern world.  The course will begin with examples of conflict and coexistence between Jews, Muslims, and Christians from the Roman Empire to the Middle Ages, and continue through the eventual consolidation of political rule and the fracturing of Latin Christendom in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries,  Topics include the development of medieval European society, changes in labor and slavery, the Crusades, heresy and conversion, the idea of race in the Middle Ages, the Inquisition, the European expulsions of Muslims and Jews, Black Africans in Europe, and the debates over the natural rights and self-determination of indigenous peoples and slaves in the New World.

115.05, 20321 TR 12:15-1:30, Crosby
Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines.

115.06, 21516 MWF 10-10:50, Smith
A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.07, 20752 MWF 11-11:50, Lary
History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in the ancient world. The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise. While we will address many ancient philosophies and religions in this course, the primary focus will be on three case studies: the empires of ancient Greece, ancient India, and ancient Persia. In ancient Greece, the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics through the Hellenistic thinkers will be highlighted and placed within the cultural and political context. In ancient India, we will pay particular attention to the development of the competing yet symbiotic teachings of ancient Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. Finally, our study of ancient Persia will begin with the history of ancient Zoroastrianism.

115.08, 20323 TR 1:40-2:55, Crosby
Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines.

115.09, 20324 TR 9:50-10:40, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.10, 21517 MW 2-3:15, Phillips
Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.11, 22289 MWF 12-12:50, Luquer
State and Religion. History 115 is a thematically-driven premodern history class, intended to hone analytical thinking and writing skills while exploring an important aspect of world history.  The theme of this class is religion and state building---how the two have woven together in antiquity and through the middle ages to create distinctive cultures based on religion. We will focus on the development of origin stories that help the indigenous peoples of the world develop and answer the questions they had about their surroundings. We will also examine how these stories developed into polytheistic and then the monotheistic religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, after the fall of imperial Rome by the Carolingian empire and medieval humanists, as well as the changing landscape of religion and government through the end of the middle ages.

115.12, 20326 TR 10:50-12:05, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.13, 20327 TR 1:40-2:55, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.14, 23279 TR 8-9:15, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.15, 20329 TR 3:05-4:20, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.16, 20330 MWF 9-9:50, Crout
THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.17, 20331 MWF 11-11:50, Crout
THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.18, 20332 MWF 1-1:50, Crout
THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.19, 22182 MW 3:25-4:40, Phillips
Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.20, 21229 MWF 9-9:50, Smith
A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.21, 23580 MWF 9-9:50 and ONLINE, Martin
Pre-Modern History.

115.22, 22183 MWF 10-10:50, Luquer
State and Religion. History 115 is a thematically-driven premodern history class, intended to hone analytical thinking and writing skills while exploring an important aspect of world history.  The theme of this class is religion and state building---how the two have woven together in antiquity and through the middle ages to create distinctive cultures based on religion. We will focus on the development of origin stories that help the indigenous peoples of the world develop and answer the questions they had about their surroundings. We will also examine how these stories developed into polytheistic and then the monotheistic religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, after the fall of imperial Rome by the Carolingian empire and medieval humanists, as well as the changing landscape of religion and government through the end of the middle ages.

115.23, 22306 MW 5:30-8:15, Piccione
World History in Hollywood Films. This film course meets for seven weeks only during Express I. It surveys selected great civilizations in World History from 3,000 BC to 1300 AD. It focuses on deconstructing mythologies, false perceptions, and popular misconceptions about these civilizations by examining popular Hollywood films and foreign cinematic spectacles. Students will study and discuss specific historical issues as they are properly understood, view the films, and analyze discrepancies between fact and fiction by asking pertinent historical questions and applying proper historical methodology. Hence, students will understand and interpret how history is often distorted for a variety of reasons, including dramatic license for entertainment purposes, as well as society’s need to legitimize political policies or to sanitize and/or mythologize its past. This course will be completed by the regular midterm period.

115.24, 20336 MWF 8-8:50, Van Meer
A World of Inventions. This course explores the history of our world, from the first hunter-gatherer societies until the dawn of modernity in the 15th century, using the comparative method. The theme of this global history course is invention and technology. By contextualizing key inventions of the past, e.g. prehistoric cave paintings, early Egyptian and Chinese tombs, classical Greek and Roman (amphi)theaters, and medieval Byzantine and Islamic Domes, we will analyze how technological developments reflect the cultural/religious values, political power, and gender/social beliefs of their respective societies.

115.25, 23581 MWF 10-10:50 and ONLINE, Martin
Pre-Modern History.

115.27, 20750 MWF 9-9:50, Van Meer
A World of Inventions. This course explores the history of our world, from the first hunter-gatherer societies until the dawn of modernity in the 15th century, using the comparative method. The theme of this global history course is invention and technology. By contextualizing key inventions of the past, e.g. prehistoric cave paintings, early Egyptian and Chinese tombs, classical Greek and Roman (amphi)theaters, and medieval Byzantine and Islamic Domes, we will analyze how technological developments reflect the cultural/religious values, political power, and gender/social beliefs of their respective societies.

115.29, 20978 MWF 8-8:50, Dingley
Maritime Cultures of the Indian Ocean World. From the Swahili city-states of the East African coast to the nomadic seafaring societies of the Southeast Asian archipelago, this course explores the cosmopolitan world of the Indian Ocean from antiquity through the rise of Islam to the arrival of the Portuguese in 1498. Our focus will be on the diasporic movement of people and plants, language and culture, religion and technology over two thousand years of maritime history, and the underlying environmental forces and institutional forms that helped make the Indian Ocean the most dynamic cultural crossroads of the pre-modern era.

115.31, 20833 MWF 12-12:50, Lary
History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in the ancient world. The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise. While we will address many ancient philosophies and religions in this course, the primary focus will be on three case studies: the empires of ancient Greece, ancient India, and ancient Persia. In ancient Greece, the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics through the Hellenistic thinkers will be highlighted and placed within the cultural and political context. In ancient India, we will pay particular attention to the development of the competing yet symbiotic teachings of ancient Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. Finally, our study of ancient Persia will begin with the history of ancient Zoroastrianism.

115.33, 21164 MWF 9-9:50, Dingley
Maritime Cultures of the Indian Ocean World. From the Swahili city-states of the East African coast to the nomadic seafaring societies of the Southeast Asian archipelago, this course explores the cosmopolitan world of the Indian Ocean from antiquity through the rise of Islam to the arrival of the Portuguese in 1498. Our focus will be on the diasporic movement of people and plants, language and culture, religion and technology over two thousand years of maritime history, and the underlying environmental forces and institutional forms that helped make the Indian Ocean the most dynamic cultural crossroads of the pre-modern era.

116.01, 23280 TR 10:50-12:05, Schaffer
Modern Piracy, 1500 - Present. This course examines global piracy from the 1500s-2000s, with a special focus on Anglo-American piracy and its intersection with imperial rivalries and colonization in the 1600s and 1700s. This course will cover how pirates challenged imperial goals in the Americas, Europe, Asia, Africa, and changed world history as we know it. After debunking the notion that pirates were a fun, treasure hunting, group of flamboyant adventurers, we will focus on how early modern and modern governments have dealt with this dangerous military threat throughout the last 500 years. As we will discover, pirates not only plagued empires, but became a special tool for empire building itself throughout the world.

116.02, 20345 TR 5:30-6:45, Schaffer
Modern Piracy, 1500 - Present. This course examines global piracy from the 1500s-2000s, with a special focus on Anglo-American piracy and its intersection with imperial rivalries and colonization in the 1600s and 1700s. This course will cover how pirates challenged imperial goals in the Americas, Europe, Asia, Africa, and changed world history as we know it. After debunking the notion that pirates were a fun, treasure hunting, group of flamboyant adventurers, we will focus on how early modern and modern governments have dealt with this dangerous military threat throughout the last 500 years. As we will discover, pirates not only plagued empires, but became a special tool for empire building itself throughout the world.

116.03, 20346 TR 12:15-1:30, Boucher
Western Representations of Native Americans since the Renaissance. This course will survey the history of Western societies from the Renaissance to the present and focus on the following question:  How have changing cultural values in the Western world shaped local perceptions of Native Americans over time?  As this class will show, Western depictions of Native Americans have often revealed more about the societies that produced them than about the indigenous peoples they intended to describe.  Whether it was during the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, or the late nineteenth century, the Western discourse on American Indians has been deeply colored by the values, anxieties, and fantasies that characterized each period. Therefore, such representations cannot be understood without reference to the historical context that informed them.

116.04, 22184 TR 1:40-2:55, Pennebaker
Slavery, Resistance, and Freedom in the Black Atlantic World. 
How have Black Americans contributed to the fabric of the United States throughout history? In this course, we will survey African American history by focusing on the role Black people have played in the development of the Atlantic World to the 20th century. Tracing the accomplishments and obstacles of African Americans throughout time and space in the African Diaspora, we will learn about the political, economic, social, religious, and cultural factors that have influenced African American life. In this course, we will learn more about the key people and events that shaped the transnational Black Experience from the 1400s to 1900. To this end, we will explore the following themes: the development of racial slavery; enslaved and free Black communities; the continuing quest for racial equity; resistance and protest; African American expressions of culture and identity; gender; religion; evolving notions of freedom; and how the history of African Americans influences current events.

116.05, 20347 TR 1:40-2:55, Boucher
Western Representations of Native Americans since the Renaissance.
This course will survey the history of Western societies from the Renaissance to the present and focus on the following question:  How have changing cultural values in the Western world shaped local perceptions of Native Americans over time?  As this class will show, Western depictions of Native Americans have often revealed more about the societies that produced them than about the indigenous peoples they intended to describe.  Whether it was during the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, or the late nineteenth century, the Western discourse on American Indians has been deeply colored by the values, anxieties, and fantasies that characterized each period. Therefore, such representations cannot be understood without reference to the historical context that informed them.

116.06, 20348 TR 9:25-10:40, Poole
Histories of Satan, Histories of Evil. “Those Who Consider the Devil to be a partisan of evil and angels to be the warriors of the good have accepted the demagoguery of angels. The case is clearly more complicated.” - Milan Kundera. Do you ever use the word evil? If so, for what kind of acts, experiences, people? Can you imagine that the idea of evil has a history like war or democracy? Have Americans and Europeans been obsessed with the Devil in the distant past as the embodiment of evil? Has this changed? What do you think of the idea that the notion of Satan is actually more important to many Americans than it has been in the past? Do you agree or disagree with this? What is the history of this idea and what is its meaning for the present? How will you define the idea of evil after you learn its history?

116.07, 20349 TR 10:50-12:05, Poole
Histories of Satan, Histories of Evil. “Those Who Consider the Devil to be a partisan of evil and angels to be the warriors of the good have accepted the demagoguery of angels. The case is clearly more complicated.” - Milan Kundera. Do you ever use the word evil? If so, for what kind of acts, experiences, people? Can you imagine that the idea of evil has a history like war or democracy? Have Americans and Europeans been obsessed with the Devil in the distant past as the embodiment of evil? Has this changed? What do you think of the idea that the notion of Satan is actually more important to many Americans than it has been in the past? Do you agree or disagree with this? What is the history of this idea and what is its meaning for the present? How will you define the idea of evil after you learn its history?

116.08, 20350 TR 3:05-4:20, Pennebaker
Slavery, Resistance, and Freedom in the Black Atlantic World. How have Black Americans contributed to the fabric of the United States throughout history? In this course, we will survey African American history by focusing on the role Black people have played in the development of the Atlantic World to the 20th century. Tracing the accomplishments and obstacles of African Americans throughout time and space in the African Diaspora, we will learn about the political, economic, social, religious, and cultural factors that have influenced African American life. In this course, we will learn more about the key people and events that shaped the transnational Black Experience from the 1400s to 1900. To this end, we will explore the following themes: the development of racial slavery; enslaved and free Black communities; the continuing quest for racial equity; resistance and protest; African American expressions of culture and identity; gender; religion; evolving notions of freedom; and how the history of African Americans influences current events.

116.09, 20351 TR 9:25-10:40, Crosby
Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved. The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.10, 22185 MWF 2-2:50 and ONLINE, Slater
Women, Gender, and Race in Modern History. 
Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of women, gender, race, and sexualities in relation to the rise of Western Civilization. The focus will be on gendered liberties. Studying the various roles of women and their relationships to men provide a unique lens through which to understand the rise of Europe and the Western world.  The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage women’s role in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexualities.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint) and discussion.  You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

116.11, 22186 TR 1:40-2:55 and ONLINE, Ruggles
Modern History in Film and Public Memory. This survey class focuses on Modern World History, from 1500 to as present-day as possible, and focuses on history as film. Using film, the textbook, primary sources, and a secondary textbook, this class debates what constitutes a historical film through the eyes of historians. While this survey course covers a broad area of geography and chronology, the focus remains on history as film and how it provides the public with both historical and ahistorical information. Using a comparative method, the class will view multiple films, read about multiple cultures, and determine what Hollywood did well and where Hollywood adversely affects public memory of certain events, places, and people. The goal of this class is not only to learn about history throughout the modern world but also to become discerning scholars of Hollywood's often time fictionalized version of history while also gaining a better understanding of the challenges filmmakers and historians face when educating the public about historical events. Ultimately, the students will be better equipped to know "What is history?" as well as "what is a historical film?" 

116.12, 21130 MW 3:25-4:40, Luquer
Revolutions in the Modern World. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the continuities and discontinuities of change and connection. We will start in the latter part of the Renaissance (ca. 1450) as Europe begins a new relationship with the greater world, while the European continent suffers from the divisions in religion and war as it enters the modern era. This course will follow the religious, social and political upheavals of the modern era. The material in this course includes the Protestant Reformation, the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the French Wars of Religion and the Thirty Years War, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, both the American and French Revolutions, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries.

116.13, 22187 TR 12:15-1:30 and ONLINE, Ruggles
Modern History in Film and Public Memory. 
This survey class focuses on Modern World History, from 1500 to as present-day as possible, and focuses on history as film. Using film, the textbook, primary sources, and a secondary textbook, this class debates what constitutes a historical film through the eyes of historians. While this survey course covers a broad area of geography and chronology, the focus remains on history as film and how it provides the public with both historical and ahistorical information. Using a comparative method, the class will view multiple films, read about multiple cultures, and determine what Hollywood did well and where Hollywood adversely affects public memory of certain events, places, and people. The goal of this class is not only to learn about history throughout the modern world but also to become discerning scholars of Hollywood's often time fictionalized version of history while also gaining a better understanding of the challenges filmmakers and historians face when educating the public about historical events. Ultimately, the students will be better equipped to know "What is history?" as well as "what is a historical film?" 

116.14, 21131 MWF 9-9:50, Gonaver
Epidemics & Public Health. How did people react to epidemics in the past? This course explores the history of public health from the plague hospitals of Renaissance Italy to the current COVID-19 pandemic. By examining past responses to infectious and chronic diseases, we can better understand the present moment and prepare for future crises.

116.15, 22394 TR 12:15-1:30, Schaffer
Modern Piracy, 1500 - Present. This course examines global piracy from the 1500s-2000s, with a special focus on Anglo-American piracy and its intersection with imperial rivalries and colonization in the 1600s and 1700s. This course will cover how pirates challenged imperial goals in the Americas, Europe, Asia, Africa, and changed world history as we know it. After debunking the notion that pirates were a fun, treasure hunting, group of flamboyant adventurers, we will focus on how early modern and modern governments have dealt with this dangerous military threat throughout the last 500 years. As we will discover, pirates not only plagued empires, but became a special tool for empire building itself throughout the world.

116.16, 20354 ONLINE, Ingram
Race and Imperialism in America. In this course we will explore efforts to both support and challenge ideas about empire by studying global conflicts, cultural revolutions, and major social movements in the U.S. and abroad between the 1890s and the present. By re-thinking topics such as western imperialism alongside Jim Crow segregation in the U.S.; international Cold War Diplomacy alongside the American Civil Rights Movement; and American proxy wars within the context of decolonization, we will re-evaluate major events in American History during Long Twentieth Century within a global context. While this class focuses on a ~125-year period, we will explore a much broader period for most of the topics we study in order to better understand the historical contexts in which they occurred.

116.17, 20355 MWF 8-8:50, Lary
Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.18, 20356 MWF 9-9:50, Lary
Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.19, 23281 TR 3:05-4:20, Crosby
Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved. The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.20, 21230 MWF 1-1:50, Gonaver
Epidemics & Public Health. How did people react to epidemics in the past? This course explores the history of public health from the plague hospitals of Renaissance Italy to the current COVID-19 pandemic. By examining past responses to infectious and chronic diseases, we can better understand the present moment and prepare for future crises.

116.21, 22429 TR 3:05-4:20, Schaffer
Modern Piracy, 1500 - Present. This course examines global piracy from the 1500s-2000s, with a special focus on Anglo-American piracy and its intersection with imperial rivalries and colonization in the 1600s and 1700s. This course will cover how pirates challenged imperial goals in the Americas, Europe, Asia, Africa, and changed world history as we know it. After debunking the notion that pirates were a fun, treasure hunting, group of flamboyant adventurers, we will focus on how early modern and modern governments have dealt with this dangerous military threat throughout the last 500 years. As we will discover, pirates not only plagued empires, but became a special tool for empire building itself throughout the world.

116.22, 21407 MWF 9-9:50, Luquer
Revolutions in the Modern World. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the continuities and discontinuities of change and connection. We will start in the latter part of the Renaissance (ca. 1450) as Europe begins a new relationship with the greater world, while the European continent suffers from the divisions in religion and war as it enters the modern era. This course will follow the religious, social and political upheavals of the modern era. The material in this course includes the Protestant Reformation, the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the French Wars of Religion and the Thirty Years War, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, both the American and French Revolutions, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries.

116.23, 21586 MW 4-5:15, Jenkins
Modern History. This class covers the history of the Modern West, focusing on the rise and fall of empires. Along the way we’ll discuss colonialism, nationalism, industrialization, capitalism and war—all the things that helped hasten both the rise and the fall of empires. The empire has been a dominant form of government in the western world for over 4000 years. In this class we’ll discuss why, and question whether that’s changed.

116.24, 23294 MWF 10-10:50, Tsahiridis
The American Wild West: Myths and Legacy. This course will examine the changing image of the American West from the arrival of Spanish conquistadors in the sixteenth century to present-day U.S. and Mexico. Special attention will be given to the interactions between indigenous peoples, settler colonists, and nation-states in the North American borderlands, as well as the West's portrayal in folklore, art, and films to show how popular impressions have reflected both national and international attitudes and values. 

116.25, 20873 MWF 11-11:50, Phillips
Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?

116.26, 23295 MWF 12-12:50, Tsahiridis
The American Wild West: Myths and Legacy. This course will examine the changing image of the American West from the arrival of Spanish conquistadors in the sixteenth century to present-day U.S. and Mexico. Special attention will be given to the interactions between indigenous peoples, settler colonists, and nation-states in the North American borderlands, as well as the West's portrayal in folklore, art, and films to show how popular impressions have reflected both national and international attitudes and values.  

116.27, 20358 MWF 11-11:50, Van Meer
Modern History.
This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the historical thread uniting all our topics is “the Arctic”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today. 

116.28, 20359 MWF 12-12:50, Van Meer
Modern History.
This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the historical thread uniting all our topics is “the Arctic”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.30, 21424 TR 5:30-6:45 and ONLINE, Ruggles
Modern History in Film and Public Memory. 
This survey class focuses on Modern World History, from 1500 to as present-day as possible, and focuses on history as film. Using film, the textbook, primary sources, and a secondary textbook, this class debates what constitutes a historical film through the eyes of historians. While this survey course covers a broad area of geography and chronology, the focus remains on history as film and how it provides the public with both historical and ahistorical information. Using a comparative method, the class will view multiple films, read about multiple cultures, and determine what Hollywood did well and where Hollywood adversely affects public memory of certain events, places, and people. The goal of this class is not only to learn about history throughout the modern world but also to become discerning scholars of Hollywood's often time fictionalized version of history while also gaining a better understanding of the challenges filmmakers and historians face when educating the public about historical events. Ultimately, the students will be better equipped to know "What is history?" as well as "what is a historical film?" 

116.32, 20361 MWF 2-2:50, Gordanier
East Asian History Through Performing Arts: From Kunqu to K-Pop and Beyond. The performing arts in premodern East Asia were more than just entertainment: music, dance, story, and acting were tools for education, social networking, diplomacy, and religious ritual, but they were also (according to authorities), dangerous vehicles for corruption, sedition, and debauchery. What makes performance so powerful even today? This course uses theater, dance, music, and other performance forms as a window on East Asian history and society from premodern times to the present day, with a particular focus on China, Korea, and Japan in the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. We will investigate the ways performing arts conveyed, transgressed, or even shaped ideas about how people ought to think and live; the audiences these performances reached; and the people who brought them to life.

116.37, 20832 MWF 1-1:50, Smith
Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.40, 20877 MW 2-3:15, Luquer
Revolutions in the Modern World. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the continuities and discontinuities of change and connection. We will start in the latter part of the Renaissance (ca. 1450) as Europe begins a new relationship with the greater world, while the European continent suffers from the divisions in religion and war as it enters the modern era. This course will follow the religious, social and political upheavals of the modern era. The material in this course includes the Protestant Reformation, the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the French Wars of Religion and the Thirty Years War, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, both the American and French Revolutions, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries.

116.42, 20876 MWF 12-12:50 and ONLINE, Phillips
Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?

116.43, 21165 MWF 11-11:50, Gonaver
Epidemics & Public Health. 
How did people react to epidemics in the past? This course explores the history of public health from the plague hospitals of Renaissance Italy to the current COVID-19 pandemic. By examining past responses to infectious and chronic diseases, we can better understand the present moment and prepare for future crises.

116.44, 21933 MW 5:30-6:45, Jenkins
Modern History. This class covers the history of the Modern West, focusing on the rise and fall of empires. Along the way we’ll discuss colonialism, nationalism, industrialization, capitalism and war—all the things that helped hasten both the rise and the fall of empires. The empire has been a dominant form of government in the western world for over 4000 years. In this class we’ll discuss why, and question whether that’s changed.

202.01, 21519 MWF 12-12:50, Smith
United States since 1865. We will incorporate peoples’ actions into the context of modern American history, beginning with the final shots of the Civil War and concluding in the present time. By weaving together the social, political, economic, and environmental aspects of the American experience, this course will seek to explain how and why particular people of various backgrounds crucially shaped a nation. In doing so, we will see how United States citizens and immigrants transformed the land and each other while developing an overall American identity. Ultimately, we will focus on the

217.01, 20362 MW 2-3:15, Pennebaker
African American History since 1865. How have Black Americans contributed to the fabric of the United States throughout history? Tracing the accomplishments and obstacles of African Americans from the end of the American Civil War to twentieth century and beyond, we will learn about the political, economic, social, religious, and cultural factors that have influenced African American life. In this course, we will learn more about the key people and events that shaped the Black Experience from the end of the Civil War to the present day. To this end, we will explore the following themes: African Americans’ efforts to negotiate citizenship after the Civil War; the construction of a Jim Crow America; Black Americans’ negotiations for civil rights and economic equality in the twenty-first century; African American expressions of culture from the Harlem Renaissance to Black Power and Black is Beautiful to Hip Hop; and how the history of African Americans influences current events.

225.01, 21515 TR 12:15-1:30 and ONLINE, Ingram
History of the South since 1865. This course is an introduction to the study of the American South. Although we will study different events, people, and places from various angles throughout the semester, our survey of the South is grounded in the theme of southern “distinctiveness.” Why, after all, do westudy the history of the South as a separate subdiscipline? What is the South, exactly? How have the region’s defining characteristics changed over time? Nothing, of course, is distinct in isolation, so we will also situate the South within the context of American History ( and World History, too). At what points could we say that the South was more (or less) integrated into the (inter)national economy and the body politic? Do ideas about southern “distinctiveness” change during major events like wars, economic depressions, or political realignments?

232.01, 20920 MWF 2-2:50, Alwine
Ancient Rome.
 

235.01, 22818 MWF 12-12:50, Jestice
High Middle Ages. This course deals with the developed, increasingly centralized states of the second half of the Middle Ages—not just the politics but the values and lives of the people who lived in them.  We start in the middle of the eleventh century, with the outbreak of a massive fight between the papacy and the German emperors, which in time transformed the papacy and nearly destroyed Germany; our ending point is the fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.  The course will especially emphasize lived experience; to that end, the three full books we will study in the class (besides OAKS readings) are a biography and two autobiographies, which explore what it was like to be a knight (William Marshal), the life of a famous traveler (Marco Polo), and the first-hand account of a wanna-be mystic and holy woman (Margery Kempe).

247.01, 22819 MWF 10-10:50, Gigova
Empire, Nation, Class in Eastern Europe. This course will introduce you to the history of Eastern Europe, the territory between modern-day Germany and Russia. In the course of the semester we will examine the historical construction of national identities, social movements, and cultural trends as the region progressed from imperial dominion (Habsburg, Romanov and Ottoman) to independent statehood. We will explore how the ethnically and religiously diverse, yet relatively tolerant, milieu of the 19th century gave way to violent nationalisminthe 1900sand Cold War division after 1945. The rapid and multiple shifts in the region’s state boundaries, political systems and cultural identities during the last two centuries provide an intriguing caseof the interaction between change and continuity in history. Approached as an intersection of local specificities and wider European trends, Eastern European history offers an excellent ground for a discussion of broader issues such asimperialism, modernization, violence and everyday life.

250.01, 23291 MWF 10-10:50, Gibbs
Special Topic: A History of Lies.

250.02, 23292 MWF 11-11:50, Gibbs
Special Topic: Race and the Second World War.

261.01, 21518 MWF 11-11:50, Dingley
Special Topic: African Religion and Ritual. This class offers an introduction to a broad range of African religious beliefs and ritual practices, as well as to a variety of theoretical approaches to their study. We will explore several “classic” topics in the field—spirit possession, divination, initiation, witchcraft, healing, sacrifice, etc.—together with the history of so-called “world religions” (like Christianity and Islam) in Africa. We will approach these through case studies drawn from across the continent from the precolonial period to the present, carefully situating each in their social and historical context. Along the way, we will query each of the three terms of the course title: What is “ritual,” for example? How do we know it when we see it? What do we mean by “religion”? And in what sense are any of these “African”?

270.03, 21406 TR 4-6:45, Piccione
Special Topic: Ancient Egypt: Society, Women, and Daily Life. This course meets for seven weeks only during Express I. It centers the life of the common man and woman in Egyptian society from the Old Kingdom through Dynasty 26, ca. 2600-525 BC. Topics are arranged conceptually (not chronologically) to gain insight into Egyptian social institutions and relationships. Subjects include: language and writing (including elementary lessons in reading and writing Egyptian hieroglyphs), the decipherment of hieroglyphs, the educational system and issues of literacy, structure of society, the role of social initiation, role and status of women in society (motherhood, marriage), love and sex, economic structures and institutions, types of occupations and labor conditions, social advancement, function and practice of religion, medicine and medical magic, and games and recreation. This course will be completed by the regular midterm period.

273.01, 22820 TR 1:40-2:55, Cropper
Modern Africa. This course explores the history of Modern Africa by examining continuity and change throughout the continent from the early nineteenth century to today. The course starts by considering how Africans responded to global processes of transformation, such as the end of the transatlantic slave trade, the emergence of “legitimate commerce,” and the European Scramble for Africa. In doing so, we will trace how African systems of trade, politics, and culture did not simply disappear with European conquest, but have continued to shape the way Africans live in the modern world. The course will then consider the history of Africa under the yoke of European colonialism. In taking a broad geographic and thematic lens, we will examine consistent themes of colonialism over time and space, focusing on the nature of colonial rule, resistance and collaboration, the environment and natural resources, and decolonization and independence. We will then turn to the history of postcolonial Africa and examine the diverse experiences of independent African nations. In particular, we will explore how Africans have both shaped and responded to local and global processes of change and transformation, from the establishment of self-rule, democratization, and apartheid and despotism to global phenomena such as neoliberalism, development and aid, and globalization.

283.01, 22821 MWF 1-1:50, Gordanier
History of Modern China. This is a chronological and thematic introduction to the history of modern China from the seventeenth century to the present. No prior background in East Asian studies is required. The course examines the achievements and challenges of the multiethnic Qing Empire and its nineteenth-century showdown with corruption, rebellion, imperialism, and reform. We will explore how China was consciously re-forged from an "empire" into a nation-state after the 1911 Xinhai Revolution, in the midst of conflict between warlords, foreign invaders, Nationalists, and Communists. We will then consider the Communist Revolution of 1949 and the rapid social and political changes of the latter half of the 20th century. The course concludes by placing some topics of current concern into their context within China’s modern history, including economic growth, rights for women and sexual minorities, ethnic diversity, and the COVID-19 pandemic.

299.02, 20942 MWF 10-10:50, Gordanier
Historian's Craft. The Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

299.03, 20959 MW 2-3:15, Jestice
Historian's Craft. The Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

304.01, 23029 MW 2-3:15, Gonaver
History of the United States: Civil War and Reconstruction, 1845-1877. 
This course examines the political conflicts over slavery that led to the Civil War; key moments, issues, and people that shaped the course of the war; and postwar conflicts over governance, especially the struggles of African Americans to exercise their legal rights and to thrive. The emphasis is on the experiences and perspectives of ordinary people who lived through an extraordinary time. 

310.01, 23293 TR 1:40-2:55, Walters
Special Topic: Southern Jewish History.

320.01, 22823 T 5:30-8:15, Stockton
Special Topic: Lowcountry History – Charleston Architecture. 
This course is a topical study of the architecture of Charleston and the Lowcountry of South Carolina, from the Colonial period to the early decades of the twenty-first century. The European, Caribbean and West African roots of Charleston architecture are explored. Architectural periods and styles, building types, town planning, colonial fortifications, landscape architecture, and historic preservation are explored.

350.01, 21798 TR 1:40-2:55, Mikati
Special Topic: Women in Muslim Societies. This course is an examination of the rights, roles, and portrayals of women in Muslim societies. We will cover women’s roles from the rise of Islam to the contemporary period giving special emphasis to the foundational Islamic texts and their interpretations. We will then consider how these are articulated in medieval and modern legal systems. Attention will be paid to the effects of colonialism and nationalist movements on Muslim women, and indigenous feminist movements in the Muslim world.

350.02, 23221 TR 9:25-10:40, Boucher
Special Topic: Native Americans and the Clash of Empires. This course will examine the Native American experience during the imperial conflicts that rocked North America from the late 17th century to the mid-18thcentury.

441.01, 22825 TR 10:50-12:05, Steere-Williams
Research Seminar: The Body and the State in Victorian Britain. The Victorian period ushered in a number of critical changes to British history: the Industrial Revolution, a nation-wide census, the expansion of the voting electorate, the basis of a public health infrastructure, transportation networks, and the one of the largest empires in modern world history. Our capstone seminar will provide an overview of many of these developments in nineteenth century Britain using the ideas of state development and surveillance. Using a collective group of readings, students will formulate an individual research project that focuses on some aspect of how bodies were controlled, attempted to be controlled, or resisted government control in this period.

450.01, 22826 TR 12:15-1:30, Covert
Research Seminar: Transnational Histories of the Americas. This capstone is designed to incorporate a wide range of transnational topics (diplomatic, political, economic, social, cultural) as they relate to any part of the western hemisphere, however our readings will focus on how people, ideas, and commodities move across national or imperial borders.