Spring 2021 Courses

Course Descriptions

104.01, 20876 TR 8-9:15, Crosby
World History from 1500 CE to Present. History 104 will cover world history from 1500 CE to the present, and covers the chief political, social, economic, cultural, and religious developments in that period. The objectives of the course are to examine the interaction between different cultures with differing worldviews, globalization (the increasing interconnection between economies, societies, and their ideas), and the effects of industrialization, modernization, imperialism, decolonization, and their consequences, and the effects of the two world war.

115.01, 20384 TR 12:15-1:30 and ONLINE, Mikati
Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.02, 20385 TR 1:40-2:55 and ONLINE, Mikati
Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.03, 20387 MWF 11-11:50 and ONLINE, Jones
Religion, Race, and the Making of the West. Religious violence and toleration were pressing concerns in the Middle Ages, just as they are today.  In this course, we will explore how medieval conceptions of religion and rights were tied to emerging ideas about nation and race in the development of European Christendom and its internal and external boundaries, laying the foundations for long-term discussions about human rights in the modern world.  The course will begin with examples of conflict and coexistence between Jews, Muslims, and Christians from the Roman Empire to the Middle Ages, and continue through the eventual consolidation of political rule and the fracturing of Latin Christendom in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries,  Topics include the development of medieval European society, changes in labor and slavery, the Crusades, heresy and conversion, the idea of race in the Middle Ages, the Inquisition, the European expulsions of Muslims and Jews, Black Africans in Europe, and the debates over the natural rights and self-determination of indigenous peoples and slaves in the New World. 

115.04, 20388 MWF 12-12:50 and ONLINE, Jones
Religion, Race, and the Making of the West. Religious violence and toleration were pressing concerns in the Middle Ages, just as they are today.  In this course, we will explore how medieval conceptions of religion and rights were tied to emerging ideas about nation and race in the development of European Christendom and its internal and external boundaries, laying the foundations for long-term discussions about human rights in the modern world.  The course will begin with examples of conflict and coexistence between Jews, Muslims, and Christians from the Roman Empire to the Middle Ages, and continue through the eventual consolidation of political rule and the fracturing of Latin Christendom in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries,  Topics include the development of medieval European society, changes in labor and slavery, the Crusades, heresy and conversion, the idea of race in the Middle Ages, the Inquisition, the European expulsions of Muslims and Jews, Black Africans in Europe, and the debates over the natural rights and self-determination of indigenous peoples and slaves in the New World.

115.05, 20389 MWF 12-12:50. Dingley
Maritime Cultures of the Indian Ocean World. From the Swahili city-states of the East African coast to the nomadic seafaring societies of the Southeast Asian archipelago, this course explores the cosmopolitan world of the Indian Ocean from antiquity through the rise of Islam to the arrival of the Portuguese in 1498. Our focus will be on the diasporic movement of people and plants, language and culture, religion and technology over two thousand years of maritime history, and the underlying environmental forces and institutional forms that helped make the Indian Ocean the most dynamic cultural crossroads of the pre-modern era.

115.07, 20895 MWF 10-10:50, Smith
A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.08, 20391 TR 9:25-10:40 and ONLINE, Piccione
History, Legend and Mythology. This course surveys the major civilizations of the ancient world through the lens of legend and mythology. Beginning with Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, it continues through the Minoans, Greeks and Romans (up to. AD 476). It focuseson the major myths and legends of these societies, including early creation mythologies, Egyptian and Mesopotamian legends of the gods and heroes, and legendary tales from Greece and Rome. Topics include the historical foundations of many of these legends, and the extent to which later legends of the Greeks and Romans were influenced by–or adapted from–earlier myths and legends of Egypt and the East. In this manner, the course explores not only what legends and mythology reveal about these historical civilizations, but also how those societies viewed themselves.

115.09, 20392 MWF 9-9:50, Crout
THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.12, 20394 MWF 11-11:50, Crout
THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.13, 20395 TR 12:15-1:30, Crosby
Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines.

115.15, 20397 TR 1:40-2:55, Crosby
Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines.

115.16, 20398 TR 9:25-10:40, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.17, 20399 TR 10:50-12:05, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.18, 20400 TR 1:40-2:55, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.20, 21486 MWF 9-9:50 and ONLINE, Van Meer
A World of Inventions. This course explores the history of our world, from the first hunter-gatherer societies until the dawn of modernity in the 15th century, using the comparative method. The theme of this global history course is invention and technology. By contextualizing key inventions of the past, e.g. prehistoric cave paintings, early Egyptian and Chinese tombs, classical Greek and Roman (amphi)theaters, and medieval Byzantine and Islamic Domes, we will analyze how technological developments reflect the cultural/religious values, political power, and gender/social beliefs of their respective societies.

115.24, 20404 TR 3:05-4:20, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.25, 20410 MWF 1-1:50, Phillips
Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.26, 20740 MW 2-3:15, Phillips
Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.27, 20893 MWF 9-9:50, Smith
A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.29, 21159 MWF 11-11:50, Luquer
State and Religion. History 115 is a thematically-driven premodern history class, intended to hone analytical thinking and writing skills while exploring an important aspect of world history.  The theme of this class is religion and state building---how the two have woven together in antiquity and through the middle ages to create distinctive cultures based on religion. We will focus on the development of origin stories that help the indigenous peoples of the world develop and answer the questions they had about their surroundings. We will also examine how these stories developed into polytheistic and then the monotheistic religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, after the fall of imperial Rome by the Carolingian empire and medieval humanists, as well as the changing landscape of religion and government through the end of the middle ages.

115.31, 20995 MWF 10-10:50, Luquer
State and Religion. History 115 is a thematically-driven premodern history class, intended to hone analytical thinking and writing skills while exploring an important aspect of world history.  The theme of this class is religion and state building---how the two have woven together in antiquity and through the middle ages to create distinctive cultures based on religion. We will focus on the development of origin stories that help the indigenous peoples of the world develop and answer the questions they had about their surroundings. We will also examine how these stories developed into polytheistic and then the monotheistic religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, after the fall of imperial Rome by the Carolingian empire and medieval humanists, as well as the changing landscape of religion and government through the end of the middle ages.

115.33, 21392 MWF 8-8:50 and ONLINE, Van Meer
A World of Inventions. This course explores the history of our world, from the first hunter-gatherer societies until the dawn of modernity in the 15th century, using the comparative method. The theme of this global history course is invention and technology. By contextualizing key inventions of the past, e.g. prehistoric cave paintings, early Egyptian and Chinese tombs, classical Greek and Roman (amphi)theaters, and medieval Byzantine and Islamic Domes, we will analyze how technological developments reflect the cultural/religious values, political power, and gender/social beliefs of their respective societies.

116.01, 21273 MWF 11-11:50, Phillips
Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?

116.02, 20415 TR 12:15-1:30 and ONLINE, Covert
History and Memory. This course explores modern history through the lens of history and memory. We will analyze how individuals, institutions, and governments have sought to remember or tried to forget historical events, people, and artifacts in modern world history ranging from Columbus’s arrival in the Caribbean to the present. In addition to learning about such historical topics as imperialism, authoritarianism, slavery, and war, then, students will also grapple with the political and economic implications of history and how it is commemorated, represented, or erased. This course will introduce students to broad historical currents in modern history and enable them to think more critically about history as a process, rather than as a static list of names and dates.

116.03, 20416 TR 9:25-10:40, Crosby
Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved.   The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.05, 20417 TR 1:40-2:55 and ONLINE, Donaldson
Sing for Freedom. Music has been a ubiquitous feature in protest movements of the 19th through 20th centuries. Through song, protestors have been able to express their grievances and sustain their morale in their struggles for social, cultural, political, and economic change. Music, therefore, is an important historical text that provides access to understanding the circumstances that gave rise to protest movements and insight into the motivations of activist historical actors. In this course we will examine the history of protest movements in the United States and around the world through the songs that activists created, adapted, and shared among each other and across national borders. 

116.06, 20418 TR 3:05-4:20 and ONLINE, Donaldson
Sing for Freedom. Music has been a ubiquitous feature in protest movements of the 19th through 20th centuries. Through song, protestors have been able to express their grievances and sustain their morale in their struggles for social, cultural, political, and economic change. Music, therefore, is an important historical text that provides access to understanding the circumstances that gave rise to protest movements and insight into the motivations of activist historical actors. In this course we will examine the history of protest movements in the United States and around the world through the songs that activists created, adapted, and shared among each other and across national borders. 

116.07, 20419 TR 1:40-2:55 and ONLINE, Domby
Civil War, Insurgency, and Terrorism in Modern History. This course explores modern history through an examination of armed conflict. This class will focus on the changing nature of warfare in the modern era through the lens of civil wars and insurgencies. The class will examine the differences between civil wars, wars of independence, and international conflicts to determine what makes a war a civil war. Conflicts studied will likely include The American Revolution, The American Civil War, the Philippine insurrection, the Chinese Civil War, Vietnam, Afghanistan and the War on Terror, and the Syrian Civil War.

116.08, 20420 TR 3:05-4:20 and ONLINE, Domby
Civil War, Insurgency, and Terrorism in Modern History. This course explores modern history through an examination of armed conflict. This class will focus on the changing nature of warfare in the modern era through the lens of civil wars and insurgencies. The class will examine the differences between civil wars, wars of independence, and international conflicts to determine what makes a war a civil war. Conflicts studied will likely include The American Revolution, The American Civil War, the Philippine insurrection, the Chinese Civil War, Vietnam, Afghanistan and the War on Terror, and the Syrian Civil War.

116.09, 20421 MWF 10-10:50, Gigova
FROM SUBJECT TO CITIZEN: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. Through primary sources, lectures and discussions, we will explore the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over the course of the semester we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

116.12, 21347 MWF 1-1:50, Smith
Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.14, 21348 MWF 1-1:50, Luquer
Revolutions in the Modern World. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the continuities and discontinuities of change and connection. We will start in the latter part of the Renaissance (ca. 1450) as Europe begins a new relationship with the greater world, while the European continent suffers from the divisions in religion and war as it enters the modern era. This course will follow the religious, social and political upheavals of the modern era. The material in this course includes the Protestant Reformation, the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the French Wars of Religion and the Thirty Years War, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, both the American and French Revolutions, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries.  

116.16, 20425 MWF 11-11:50, Gigova
FROM SUBJECT TO CITIZEN: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. Through primary sources, lectures and discussions, we will explore the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over the course of the semester we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

116.17, 20426 MWF 11-11:50, Gordanier
East Asian History Through Performing Arts: From Kunqu to K-Pop and Beyond. The performing arts in premodern East Asia were more than just entertainment: music, dance, story, and acting were tools for education, social networking, diplomacy, and religious ritual, but they were also (according to authorities), dangerous vehicles for corruption, sedition, and debauchery. What makes performance so powerful even today? This course uses theater, dance, music, and other performance forms as a window on East Asian history and society from premodern times to the present day, with a particular focus on China, Korea, and Japan in the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. We will investigate the ways performing arts conveyed, transgressed, or even shaped ideas about how people ought to think and live; the audiences these performances reached; and the people who brought them to life.

116.18, 20427 MWF 12-12:50, Gordanier
East Asian History Through Performing Arts: From Kunqu to K-Pop and Beyond. The performing arts in premodern East Asia were more than just entertainment: music, dance, story, and acting were tools for education, social networking, diplomacy, and religious ritual, but they were also (according to authorities), dangerous vehicles for corruption, sedition, and debauchery. What makes performance so powerful even today? This course uses theater, dance, music, and other performance forms as a window on East Asian history and society from premodern times to the present day, with a particular focus on China, Korea, and Japan in the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. We will investigate the ways performing arts conveyed, transgressed, or even shaped ideas about how people ought to think and live; the audiences these performances reached; and the people who brought them to life.

116.19, 20428 TR 10:50-12:05, Poole
Histories of Satan, Histories of Evil. “Those Who Consider the Devil to be a partisan of evil and angels to be the warriors of the good have accepted the demagoguery of angels. The case is clearly more complicated.” - Milan Kundera. Do you ever use the word evil? If so, for what kind of acts, experiences, people? Can you imagine that the idea of evil has a history like war or democracy? Have Americans and Europeans been obsessed with the Devil in the distant past as the embodiment of evil? Has this changed? What do you think of the idea that the notion of Satan is actually more important to many Americans than it has been in the past? Do you agree or disagree with this? What is the history of this idea and what is its meaning for the present? How will you define the idea of evil after you learn its history?

116.20, 21487 MWF 11-11:50 and ONLINE, Van Meer
Inventing Modern Europe. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of the European Union. The theme for this course is the interplay between technological structures, economic motivations, and societal aspirations.

116.22, 21747 MWF 12-12:50 and ONLINE, Van Meer
Inventing Modern Europe. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of the European Union. The theme for this course is the interplay between technological structures, economic motivations, and societal aspirations.

116.23, 22091 ONLINE, Ingram
Race and Imperialism in America. In this course we will explore efforts to both support and challenge ideas about empire by studying global conflicts, cultural revolutions, and major social movements in the U.S. and abroad between the 1890s and the present. By re-thinking topics such as western imperialism alongside Jim Crow segregation in the U.S.; international Cold War Diplomacy alongside the American Civil Rights Movement; and American proxy wars within the context of decolonization, we will re-evaluate major events in American History during Long Twentieth Century within a global context. While this class focuses on a ~125-year period, we will explore a much broader period for most of the topics we study in order to better understand the historical contexts in which they occurred.

116.24, 21127 MWF 10-10:50, Phillips
Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?

116.25, 21040 MWF 9-9:50 and ONLINE, Lary
Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.26, 20431 TR 12:15-1:30, Poole
Histories of Satan, Histories of Evil. “Those Who Consider the Devil to be a partisan of evil and angels to be the warriors of the good have accepted the demagoguery of angels. The case is clearly more complicated.” - Milan Kundera. Do you ever use the word evil? If so, for what kind of acts, experiences, people? Can you imagine that the idea of evil has a history like war or democracy? Have Americans and Europeans been obsessed with the Devil in the distant past as the embodiment of evil? Has this changed? What do you think of the idea that the notion of Satan is actually more important to many Americans than it has been in the past? Do you agree or disagree with this? What is the history of this idea and what is its meaning for the present? How will you define the idea of evil after you learn its history?

116.27, 20432 TR 9:25-10:40 and ONLINE, Eaves
Slavery in the Americas. In this course, we will focus on one of the most important aspects of world history—slavery in the Atlantic World from its beginnings in the late 1400 to its abolition in the 1800s. With a broad regional scope, we will look at slavery and the slave trade on both sides of the Atlantic—in Africa, North and South America, and the Caribbean. Through the course, we will gain a better understanding of the significant role slavery, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and abolitionist movements played in shaping the Atlantic world socially, culturally, politically, and economically. We will pay particular attention to themes such as slave taking, resistance, agency, labor, gender, and enslaved community and family, and the slave economy. As we live in Charleston, one of the most significant ports through which thousands of Africans forcibly entered the would-be United States, we will pay particular attention to slavery in the southern region of the US, but will gain an appreciation for how slavery looked throughout the Caribbean and Brazil.

116.28, 20433 TR 10:50-12:05 and ONLINE, Eaves
Slavery in the Americas. In this course, we will focus on one of the most important aspects of world history—slavery in the Atlantic World from its beginnings in the late 1400 to its abolition in the 1800s. With a broad regional scope, we will look at slavery and the slave trade on both sides of the Atlantic—in Africa, North and South America, and the Caribbean. Through the course, we will gain a better understanding of the significant role slavery, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and abolitionist movements played in shaping the Atlantic world socially, culturally, politically, and economically. We will pay particular attention to themes such as slave taking, resistance, agency, labor, gender, and enslaved community and family, and the slave economy. As we live in Charleston, one of the most significant ports through which thousands of Africans forcibly entered the would-be United States, we will pay particular attention to slavery in the southern region of the US, but will gain an appreciation for how slavery looked throughout the Caribbean and Brazil.

116.30, 21779 ONLINE, Veeder
Genocide in Modern History. In this course we will analyze the nature and causes of genocide, mass atrocities, and human rights issues in modern history. Together we will examine theoretical approaches to the study of genocide, state sponsored violence, and ethnically and gender-based violence, with special attention paid to the issues of race and gender. We will analyze primary source documents, memoirs, testimonies, and artistic works, and put these sources into the context of colonization processes, regimes, dictatorships, and international and civil conflicts.

116.31, 20434 MW 2-3:15, Cropper
The History of the Atlantic World, Climate Change, and the Anthropocene. This course focuses on the history of the Atlantic World and the Anthropocene from the fifteenth century to the present, and will consider how broad historical processes of transformation and change, from the Age of Exploration and the Industrial Revolution to the Great Acceleration and Climate Change, have catalyzed a new epoch in human and natural history: the Anthropocene. First, we will explore large-scale historical process, such as the dynamism of precolonial African states, interpretations of African slavery, the transatlantic slave trade, the Age of Revolutions, and European conquest and colonialism. Second, we will consider the rise of European industrial nations and explore the various causes and effects of industrialization from the nineteenth century to present day. In focusing specifically on energy and natural resources, we will trace the development of the fossil fuel economy from its British origins to present day. In doing so, we will consider how various populations of the Atlantic World have contributed to anthropogenic climate change, and how exponential economic growth and intensive energy use have triggered unprecedented processes of environmental change. Indeed, one of the primary objectives of this course is to reflect on what it means to be living in this new epoch of natural history and how we—as humans—have arrived at this point. By considering the challenging realities of the Anthropocene, from climate change to environmental degradation and mass extinction, students will consider Earth as a global ecosystem that is shaped by a variety of dynamic and interactive systems—both natural and anthropogenic.  

116.32, 20435 MW 5:30-6:45, Cropper
The History of the Atlantic World, Climate Change, and the Anthropocene. This course focuses on the history of the Atlantic World and the Anthropocene from the fifteenth century to the present, and will consider how broad historical processes of transformation and change, from the Age of Exploration and the Industrial Revolution to the Great Acceleration and Climate Change, have catalyzed a new epoch in human and natural history: the Anthropocene. First, we will explore large-scale historical process, such as the dynamism of precolonial African states, interpretations of African slavery, the transatlantic slave trade, the Age of Revolutions, and European conquest and colonialism. Second, we will consider the rise of European industrial nations and explore the various causes and effects of industrialization from the nineteenth century to present day. In focusing specifically on energy and natural resources, we will trace the development of the fossil fuel economy from its British origins to present day. In doing so, we will consider how various populations of the Atlantic World have contributed to anthropogenic climate change, and how exponential economic growth and intensive energy use have triggered unprecedented processes of environmental change. Indeed, one of the primary objectives of this course is to reflect on what it means to be living in this new epoch of natural history and how we—as humans—have arrived at this point. By considering the challenging realities of the Anthropocene, from climate change to environmental degradation and mass extinction, students will consider Earth as a global ecosystem that is shaped by a variety of dynamic and interactive systems—both natural and anthropogenic.  

116.33, 20436 MWF 1-1:50, Crout
MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD SINCE 1600: THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION. What do the material objects that are important to you tell others about who you are?  This course concentrates on the role objects (material culture) have played in defining who “we” are through studying the artifacts we leave behind such as architecture, household goods, art, foods, clothing, and style.  Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World since 1600.

116.37, 20994 MWF 8-8:50 and ONLINE, Lary
Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.40, 21044 MWF 12-12:50 and ONLINE, Lary
Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.42, 21043 MWF 11-11:50 and ONLINE, Lary
Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.43, 21393 MWF 2-2:50, Luquer
Revolutions in the Modern World. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the continuities and discontinuities of change and connection. We will start in the latter part of the Renaissance (ca. 1450) as Europe begins a new relationship with the greater world, while the European continent suffers from the divisions in religion and war as it enters the modern era. This course will follow the religious, social and political upheavals of the modern era. The material in this course includes the Protestant Reformation, the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the French Wars of Religion and the Thirty Years War, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, both the American and French Revolutions, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries. 

116.44, 23269 ONLINE, Veeder
Genocide in Modern History. In this course we will analyze the nature and causes of genocide, mass atrocities, and human rights issues in modern history. Together we will examine theoretical approaches to the study of genocide, state sponsored violence, and ethnically and gender-based violence, with special attention paid to the issues of race and gender. We will analyze primary source documents, memoirs, testimonies, and artistic works, and put these sources into the context of colonization processes, regimes, dictatorships, and international and civil conflicts.

202.01, 21964 MWF 12-12:50, Smith
United States since 1865. The purpose of this course is to incorporate peoples’ actions into the context of modern American history, beginning with the final shots of the Civil War and concluding in the present time.  By weaving together the social, political, economic, and environmental aspects of the American experience, this course will seek to explain how and why particular people of various backgrounds crucially shaped a nation.  In doing so, we will see how United States citizens and immigrants transformed the land and each other while developing an overall American identity. Ultimately, we will focus on the theme of freedom and answer the following question: what has freedom meant to Americans since the end of the Civil War, and how have those meanings changed over time? With a driving narrative of noteworthy and ordinary people, events, and institutions, this course will (hopefully) provide you with a concise, yet diverse, understanding of this nation’s evolution.

213.01, 23377 MW 2-3:15, Walters
American Jewish History: Colonial Times to the Present. 

217.01, 20437 TR 1:40-2:55 and ONLINE, Eaves
African American History since 1865. This course examines the historical experience of African Americans beginning with the period following the Civil War and continuing until the present time.  Among the topics considered are:  Reconstruction, blacks and the New South, African American leadership, the impact of the world wars, consequences of the Great Depression and New Deal, and the rise and consequences of civil rights activism.

222.01, 22961 T 5:30-8:15, Stockton
History of South Carolina. South Carolina from the colonial period to the present. Topics discussed include plantation slavery, Southern nationalism, pro-slavery ideology, the nullification crisis, the secessionist movement and the Civil War, the disintegration of slavery and the transition to a free labor economy, regional diversification and the slow process of modernization that continued throughout the 20th century. 

225.01, 21958 TR 12:15-1:30 and ONLINE, Ingram
History of the South since 1865. This course is an introduction to the study of the American South. Although we will study different events, people and places from various angles throughout the semester, we will ground our survey of the South with the theme of southern “distinctiveness.” Why, after all, do we study the history of the South as a separate subdiscipline? What is the South, exactly? How have the region’s defining characteristics changed over time? Nothing, of course, is distinct in isolation, so we will also situate the South within the context of American History (and World History, too). At what points could we say that the South was more (or less) integrated into the (inter)national economy and the body politic?  Do ideas about southern “distinctiveness” change during major events like wars, economic depressions, or political realignments?

226.01, 21959 TR 8-9:15, Poole
American Monsters: The History of American Horror Narratives. Why do we need monster stories to understand American history? This class explores American history from the colonial period to the present. We will examine how narratives of monstrosity and horror have intersected with important historical events, cultural ideologies and moral panics in the American historical experience. After some theoretical grounding in the idea of monstrosity as a marker of cultural history, we will look at specific historical periods to examine how horror narratives intertwine with significant events and ideas in folk belief, legend, political discourse, gender constructions, religion and pop culture.

232.01, 21093 TR 8-9:15 and ONLINE, Gerrish
Ancient Rome. The city of Rome grew from a tiny settlement on the Palatine Hill to a mighty empire stretching from Britain to Babylon.  In this course we will follow Rome's great generals, statesmen, and enemies from Rome's foundation by Romulus in 753 BCE to the death of Rome's first Christian emperor in 337 CE.  We will focus primarily on the political, military, and economic history of Rome; we will discuss its rich literary and artistic culture, as well. This course examines not just the history of Rome, but also its historiography: that is, how do we know what we think we know about Rome? Can - and should - we separate “history” from “myth”?  And how did ancient authors' conception of “truth” and “fact” differ from our own?

241.01, 23378 MWF 1-1:50, Veeder
Special Topics in Modern European History.

241.02, 21626 MWF 9-9:50 and ONLINE, Jones
Special Topic: The History of Human Rights in Global Early Modern EuropeThe French Revolution is touted as a milestone for fundamental human rights, such as the right to liberty and equality, freedom of religion, freedom from slavery and torture, and freedom of expression. In this special topics course, we will explore the historical development of these rights and why there is still no consensus about modern universal human rights and their application. We will examine the often-violent conflicts over these principles that took place in Europe and its territorial possessions in the Atlantic World from the Reformation in the sixteenth century to the end of the French Revolution with the Napoleonic Wars in the nineteenth century. Topics covered will include European conquest and resistance, reformations and religious wars, toleration and coexistence, torture and criminal justice reform, printing and censorship, slavery and race, civil rights and property, gender and the household, and Atlantic World revolutions.

250.02, 21754 TR 3:05-4:20 and ONLINE, Delay
Special Topic: History of Reproduction. In this course, students examine pregnancy, childbirth, reproduction, and motherhood in comparative history. The focus is on Europe and the Americas since 1600, with particular attention paid to Britain and the British colonies. Specific topics covered include experiences of pregnancy; midwifery and nursing; contraception, abortion, and infanticide; the medicalization of childbirth; and the relationship between motherhood and the modern state. Students will explore not only women’s experiences of reproduction but also the larger political, social, and cultural meanings of pregnancy, birth, and motherhood.

261.01, 21963 MWF 9-9:50, Dingley
Special Topic: Witchcraft in African History. This course introduces students to a range of beliefs and practices in Africa frequently referred to as “Witchcraft.” We will approach these phenomena and ideas about them not as mere cultural exotica, but rather as sophisticated forms of theory and practice. Through a series of case studies drawn from across the African continent, the course poses a number related questions: Is witchcraft irrational? Is it a matter of belief? How is it related to other aspects of politics, economy, and society? How do we explain observable patterns in witchcraft accusations? Is witchcraft a crime? In addressing these and other questions we will explore theories of rationality and emotion, intentionality and embodiment, mediation and representation, and engage “witchcraft” in African history as a symbolic idiom, moral philosophy of nature, and theory of political economy.

270.01, 22964 TR 9:25-10:40, Mikati
Special Topic: Muhammad and Islamic OriginsThe French scholar of the Middle East stated that “Islam was born […] in the full light of history.” This course explores this contention by examining the available sources, the Quran, classical Islamic sources, early non-Muslim literature and material sources on the life and career of its founders, Muhammad and his immediate successors. The course also engages with the latest divided scholarship on the issue of Islamic origins.

270.02, 23059 TR 12:15-1:30, Piccione
Special Topic: Ancient Egypt: Land, History, and Society. This course provides an essential introduction to ancient Egyptian civilization. Using Egyptian texts and archaeology as a basis, it explores issues related to the land and environment and political and social history. By placing Egypt on the nexus of ancient African and Near Eastern civilizations, it considers its connections to both, i.e., Egypt as Africa, Egypt as Near East. Topics include: anthropological origins and ethnicities, conceptions of self-identity, historical development, geography and environment, social institutions, status of women, religion and magic, daily life, language, writing, and more. The class will also consider how the modern West interprets Egypt as a major contributor to the development of western civilization, viewing itself in many ways as a legitimate heir of Egyptian culture, and yet at the same time, it categorizes much of it as culturally alien and otherly. History 270 can also be applied to credit in African Studies and Archaeology with the permission of the directors of those programs.

270.03, 21746 MWF 11-11:50, Jestice
Special Topic: Celtic Fringe in Pre-modern EuropeThe Celts have long been a source of popular fascination, especially for people whose ancestry is from Ireland, Scotland, or Wales. The aim of this course is to provide an introduction to the ancient and medieval Celts of Western Europe and the British Isles. We will consider aspects of their political history, social structures, cultural achievements, and religious beliefs (both pre-Christian and Christian), and no doubt explode a few romanticized misconceptions along the way. The study of Celtic history and historiography lends itself exceptionally well to lessons about the uses and limitations of the written and material evidence of the past. By the end of this course students should have a greater understanding of who and what the Celts were, the shared and distinctive aspects of the various ancient and early medieval Celtic societies, and their interactions with Europe’s non-Celtic peoples.

299.02, 21119 TR 1:40-2:55 and ONLINE, Boucher
Historian's Craft. The Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

299.03, 21139 MWF 2-2:50 and ONLINE, Slater
Historian's Craft. The Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

302.01, 23001 MWF 10-10:50 and ONLINE, Slater
Era of the American Revolution, 1763-1800

321.01, 23479 TR 9:25-10:40 and ONLINE, Crabtree
Remembering and Forgetting: Race, Violence, and Memory in American History. Collective memories are as much about the present as they are about the past. They are as much about forgetting as they are about remembering. “Race, Violence, and Memory in American History” explores various ways that Americans have imagined, remembered, and forgotten two cases of racial violence in US history—the historical traumas of enslavement and lynching—to uncover the political commitments underlying various, often competing, cultural memories of violence. Battles over the collective memory of enslavement and lynching have been especially marked by erasure—denial born out of shame and silence wrought by the aftershocks of trauma. Despite a general reluctance to remember the enslavement and lynching of African Americans, efforts to memorialize African American victims and survivors have been gaining visibility in the past few decades. Over the course of the semester, students will critically analyze a variety of memory projects from memorials and memoirs to films, art, photographs, and literature to not only understand how racial violence has been inscribed onto American identity and culture, but to imagine new strategies, steeped in a commitment to justice, to contend with these historical traumas and their legacies.

337.01, 22965 TR 10:50-12:05, Coy
Age of Reformation. An examination of the cultural, social, and political developments of the European Reformations. In this course, we will investigate recent historiography on the Reformation and major primary sources from the period in order to assess its most important preconditions, events, and consequences. Central questions of the course include: What caused the Reformation? How did it affect European society and culture? What has been its lasting significance?

347.01, 22966 TR 9:25-10:40, Bodek
Special Topic: The Third Reich in History and CultureThis class addresses one of the most extreme, indeed horrifying, moments in modern history – the Third Reich. We all know something about the history of modern Europe. This semester we will examine issues in the Third Reich’s history and look at representations of the Third Reich in culture (Especially in film). Students will evaluate evidence and arguments that address the following classic historical and historiographical issues. Among these are: Who supported the Nazis? What caused the sudden rise in popularity of National Socialism? How do historians interpret Nazism and the Third Reich? What was the structure of the Third Reich? What kind of world did the Nazi Party envisage? What was Nazi Culture? Why did Germany embark on the Second World War? How and why did the Holocaust occur?

350.01, 23086 MWF 1-1:50, Gigova
Special Topic: Comparative Nationalism. Nationalism is as strong and viable today as when it burst on the global scene in the early 1800s. In this course we will try to understand the persistence and ubiquity of nationalism in the modern world. Through theory and case studies, we will examine the origins of nationalism, its manifestations across geographical and temporal borders, and the models scholars have developed to explain its appeal and contemplate its future.

350.02, 23379 MW 3:25-4:40, Veeder
Special Topics in Comparative/Transnational History.

361.01, 23087 TR 9:25-10:40 and ONLINE, Covert
Special Topic: Mexico's Recent Past. In the United States we hear a lot about Mexico in the news and in popular culture, but most portrayals of our vast, diverse, dynamic southern neighbor are one-dimensional and lack proper historical context. This course will examine Mexico’s recent past, from the 1960s to the present, with the goal of developing a better understanding of Mexico today. Readings and discussion will draw from a wealth of new scholarship and sources corresponding to the following themes: economics and development, dissent and repression, immigration and the borderlands, and international relations.

410.01, 21053 TR 10:50-12:05 and ONLINE, Domby
Special Topic: Conflict, War, and Protest in American History and Memory. This is the capstone research seminar for history majors focused on independent research. This course uses an array of historical monographs and primary sources to study various periods of conflict, war, and protest in American history and memory. Students will research and write 30-35 page seminar papers under the professor’s supervision; in these papers, students will be expected to develop and defend their own arguments and interpretations and will analyze both primary sources and historiography.

461.01, 23002 MW 2-3:15, Gordanier.
Special Topic: The City in Early Modern AsiaIn this senior capstone seminar, students will plan, research, and write a 25-30 page seminar paper on a topic of their own choice connected to the urban history of East Asia. Between the seventeenth and the early 20th centuries, cities in East Asia were, at different times (and sometimes the same time), vital sites of administration, commerce, and culture; magnets for crime and dissolution; places of refuge; centers of triumphant empires; and targets of foreign imperial ambition. Urban history thus knits together many of the major themes of East Asian history in the early modern period, and offers ample scope for students to define their own research interests. Assigned readings for this course will center on the urban history of China, with some related excursions into Edo and Meiji-period Japan.