Fall 2022 Courses

Course Descriptions

103.01, 13730 TR 8-9:15, Crosby
World History from 1500 CE to Present. History 104 will cover world history from 1500 CE to the present, and covers the chief political, social, economic, cultural, and religious developments in that period. The objectives of the course are to examine the interaction between different cultures with differing worldviews, globalization (the increasing interconnection between economies, societies, and their ideas), and the effects of industrialization, modernization, imperialism, decolonization, and their consequences, and the effects of the two world war.

115.01, 16701 TR 3:05-4:20, Crosby
Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines.

115.02, 16817 MWF 10-10:50, Luquer
State and Religion. 
History 115 is a thematically-driven premodern history class, intended to hone analytical thinking and writing skills while exploring an important aspect of world history.  The theme of this class is religion and state building---how the two have woven together in antiquity and through the middle ages to create distinctive cultures based on religion. We will focus on the development of origin stories that help the indigenous peoples of the world develop and answer the questions they had about their surroundings. We will also examine how these stories developed into polytheistic and then the monotheistic religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, after the fall of imperial Rome by the Carolingian empire and medieval humanists, as well as the changing landscape of religion and government through the end of the middle ages.

115.03, 13688 MWF 9-9:50, Schaffer
Pre-Modern Maritime Piracy. This course will explore the role maritime piracy played in shaping empires and kingdoms from Ancient Egypt to 16th-Century England. Pirates are often portrayed as villains or even comical heroes like Jack sparrow, but oceanic thievery and warfare has played a fundamental role in human history for thousands of years. Come learn how!

115.04, 14504 MW 3:25-4:40 and ONLINE, Phillips
Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.05, 13689 MWF 11-11:50, Schaffer
Pre-Modern Maritime Piracy. This course will explore the role maritime piracy played in shaping empires and kingdoms from Ancient Egypt to 16th-Century England. Pirates are often portrayed as villains or even comical heroes like Jack sparrow, but oceanic thievery and warfare has played a fundamental role in human history for thousands of years. Come learn how!

115.06, 13690 MWF 12-12:50, Lary
History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in the ancient world. The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise. While we will address many ancient philosophies and religions in this course, the primary focus will be on three case studies: the empires of ancient Greece, ancient India, and ancient Persia. In ancient Greece, the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics through the Hellenistic thinkers will be highlighted and placed within the cultural and political context. In ancient India, we will pay particular attention to the development of the competing yet symbiotic teachings of ancient Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. Finally, our study of ancient Persia will begin with the history of ancient Zoroastrianism.

115.07, 13691 MWF 11-11:50, Lary
History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in the ancient world. The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise. While we will address many ancient philosophies and religions in this course, the primary focus will be on three case studies: the empires of ancient Greece, ancient India, and ancient Persia. In ancient Greece, the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics through the Hellenistic thinkers will be highlighted and placed within the cultural and political context. In ancient India, we will pay particular attention to the development of the competing yet symbiotic teachings of ancient Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. Finally, our study of ancient Persia will begin with the history of ancient Zoroastrianism.

115.08, 13692 MWF 12-12:50, Van Meer
A World of Inventions. This course explores the history of our world, from the first hunter-gatherer societies until the dawn of modernity in the 15th century, using the comparative method. The theme of this global history course is invention and technology. By contextualizing key inventions of the past, e.g. prehistoric cave paintings, early Egyptian and Chinese tombs, classical Greek and Roman (amphi)theaters, and medieval Byzantine and Islamic Domes, we will analyze how technological developments reflect the cultural/religious values, political power, and gender/social beliefs of their respective societies.

115.09, 13693 MWF 1-1:50, Van Meer
A World of Inventions. This course explores the history of our world, from the first hunter-gatherer societies until the dawn of modernity in the 15th century, using the comparative method. The theme of this global history course is invention and technology. By contextualizing key inventions of the past, e.g. prehistoric cave paintings, early Egyptian and Chinese tombs, classical Greek and Roman (amphi)theaters, and medieval Byzantine and Islamic Domes, we will analyze how technological developments reflect the cultural/religious values, political power, and gender/social beliefs of their respective societies.

115.10, 13694 MWF 11-11:50, Luquer
State and Religion. History 115 is a thematically-driven premodern history class, intended to hone analytical thinking and writing skills while exploring an important aspect of world history.  The theme of this class is religion and state building---how the two have woven together in antiquity and through the middle ages to create distinctive cultures based on religion. We will focus on the development of origin stories that help the indigenous peoples of the world develop and answer the questions they had about their surroundings. We will also examine how these stories developed into polytheistic and then the monotheistic religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, after the fall of imperial Rome by the Carolingian empire and medieval humanists, as well as the changing landscape of religion and government through the end of the middle ages.

115.11, 13695 MWF 12-12:50, Luquer
State and Religion. History 115 is a thematically-driven premodern history class, intended to hone analytical thinking and writing skills while exploring an important aspect of world history.  The theme of this class is religion and state building---how the two have woven together in antiquity and through the middle ages to create distinctive cultures based on religion. We will focus on the development of origin stories that help the indigenous peoples of the world develop and answer the questions they had about their surroundings. We will also examine how these stories developed into polytheistic and then the monotheistic religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, after the fall of imperial Rome by the Carolingian empire and medieval humanists, as well as the changing landscape of religion and government through the end of the middle ages.

115.12, 13696 MWF 8-8:50, Dingley
Maritime Cultures of the Indian Ocean World. From the Swahili city-states of the East African coast to the nomadic seafaring societies of the Southeast Asian archipelago, this course explores the cosmopolitan world of the Indian Ocean from antiquity through the rise of Islam to the arrival of the Portuguese in 1498. Our focus will be on the diasporic movement of people and plants, language and culture, religion and technology over two thousand years of maritime history, and the underlying environmental forces and institutional forms that helped make the Indian Ocean the most dynamic cultural crossroads of the pre-modern era.

115.13, 15589 MWF 10-10:50 and ONLINE, Martin
Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will interpret case studies in movements in Eurasia and Africa from roughly 3500 BCE to 1500 CE. We simply cannot cover every instance of travel in these roughly five- thousand years, but we will learn of how Eurasian nomads helped to establish Indo-European languages, what Romans valued in their leisure time, and perhaps most importantly, how members of different ethnic and religious groups sought to understand each other when traveling in foreign lands. The course as a whole will demonstrate that the pre-modern world was abuzz with life, perhaps challenging what you may have heart of history before 1500. You can furthermore expect a visually stunning course, as we will not only read primary source excerpts, but also interpret works of art and architecture. You will do a combination of quizzes, two or three-page papers, exams, and possibly a project which focuses upon interpretation of an excerpt of a historical source relating to travel. 

115.14, 15590 MWF 12-12:50 and ONLINE, Martin
Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will interpret case studies in movements in Eurasia and Africa from roughly 3500 BCE to 1500 CE. We simply cannot cover every instance of travel in these roughly five- thousand years, but we will learn of how Eurasian nomads helped to establish Indo-European languages, what Romans valued in their leisure time, and perhaps most importantly, how members of different ethnic and religious groups sought to understand each other when traveling in foreign lands. The course as a whole will demonstrate that the pre-modern world was abuzz with life, perhaps challenging what you may have heart of history before 1500. You can furthermore expect a visually stunning course, as we will not only read primary source excerpts, but also interpret works of art and architecture. You will do a combination of quizzes, two or three-page papers, exams, and possibly a project which focuses upon interpretation of an excerpt of a historical source relating to travel. 

115.15, 13697 ONLINE, Mikati
Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.16, 13699 MWF 9-9:50, Dingley
Maritime Cultures of the Indian Ocean World. From the Swahili city-states of the East African coast to the nomadic seafaring societies of the Southeast Asian archipelago, this course explores the cosmopolitan world of the Indian Ocean from antiquity through the rise of Islam to the arrival of the Portuguese in 1498. Our focus will be on the diasporic movement of people and plants, language and culture, religion and technology over two thousand years of maritime history, and the underlying environmental forces and institutional forms that helped make the Indian Ocean the most dynamic cultural crossroads of the pre-modern era.

115.17, 13700 MWF 10-10:50, Jestice
Making the Premodern World. How was a great amphitheater like the Colosseum actually built, considering the limited technology available to ancient Romans?  For that matter, what’s the origin of gunpowder, how was a medieval ship constructed, why was the paper mill such an innovation in world history?  If you’re interested in what makes the world tick (yes, the invention of the clock will be covered as well), this is the class for you.  This is a history of the technology of everyday life, exploring examples of how and why things were made in the ancient and medieval world.   The focus of the course will be European, but with frequent ventures into Asia as well.

115.18, 14760 MWF 8-8:50 and ONLINE, Martin
Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will interpret case studies in movements in Eurasia and Africa from roughly 3500 BCE to 1500 CE. We simply cannot cover every instance of travel in these roughly five- thousand years, but we will learn of how Eurasian nomads helped to establish Indo-European languages, what Romans valued in their leisure time, and perhaps most importantly, how members of different ethnic and religious groups sought to understand each other when traveling in foreign lands. The course as a whole will demonstrate that the pre-modern world was abuzz with life, perhaps challenging what you may have heart of history before 1500. You can furthermore expect a visually stunning course, as we will not only read primary source excerpts, but also interpret works of art and architecture. You will do a combination of quizzes, two or three-page papers, exams, and possibly a project which focuses upon interpretation of an excerpt of a historical source relating to travel.

115.19, 15628 MW 2:00-3:15 and ONLINE, Ruggles
Pre-Modern History in Film and Public Memory. This survey class focuses on pre-modern World History through the 16th century using the lens of film and through the theme of public memory. While learning about the various pre-modern cultures, civilizations, and empires, the class will examine various films, primary sources, and texts. While this is a survey course intended to provide a broad view of the pre-modern world, the focus will be on determining film's place in historical study and how it adversely or positively affects public memory of history. The class will view films set in specific eras and locations then using a comparative method, determine what Hollywood did well and where artistic license hurts public understanding of history. The goal of this class is not only to discover how early humans lived and how civilizations developed and progressed but also to determine where and how Hollywood's version of history is both helpful and harmful. 

115.20, 13701 TR 10:50-12:05, Piccione
History, Legend and Mythology. This course surveys the major civilizations of the ancient world through the lens of legend and mythology. Beginning with Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, it continues through the Minoans, Greeks and Romans (up to. AD 476). It focuseson the major myths and legends of these societies, including early creation mythologies, Egyptian and Mesopotamian legends of the gods and heroes, and legendary tales from Greece and Rome. Topics include the historical foundations of many of these legends, and the extent to which later legends of the Greeks and Romans were influenced by–or adapted from–earlier myths and legends of Egypt and the East. In this manner, the course explores not only what legends and mythology reveal about these historical civilizations, but also how those societies viewed themselves.

115.21, 14846 MWF 9-9:50 and ONLINE, Martin
Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will interpret case studies in movements in Eurasia and Africa from roughly 3500 BCE to 1500 CE. We simply cannot cover every instance of travel in these roughly five- thousand years, but we will learn of how Eurasian nomads helped to establish Indo-European languages, what Romans valued in their leisure time, and perhaps most importantly, how members of different ethnic and religious groups sought to understand each other when traveling in foreign lands. The course as a whole will demonstrate that the pre-modern world was abuzz with life, perhaps challenging what you may have heart of history before 1500. You can furthermore expect a visually stunning course, as we will not only read primary source excerpts, but also interpret works of art and architecture. You will do a combination of quizzes, two or three-page papers, exams, and possibly a project which focuses upon interpretation of an excerpt of a historical source relating to travel.

115.22, 13688 MWF 1-1:50, Schaffer
Pre-Modern Maritime Piracy. This course will explore the role maritime piracy played in shaping empires and kingdoms from Ancient Egypt to 16th-Century England. Pirates are often portrayed as villains or even comical heroes like Jack sparrow, but oceanic thievery and warfare has played a fundamental role in human history for thousands of years. Come learn how!

115.23, 15629 MW 3:25-4:40 and ONLINE, Ruggles
Pre-Modern History in Film and Public Memory. This survey class focuses on pre-modern World History through the 16th century using the lens of film and through the theme of public memory. While learning about the various pre-modern cultures, civilizations, and empires, the class will examine various films, primary sources, and texts. While this is a survey course intended to provide a broad view of the pre-modern world, the focus will be on determining film's place in historical study and how it adversely or positively affects public memory of history. The class will view films set in specific eras and locations then using a comparative method, determine what Hollywood did well and where artistic license hurts public understanding of history. The goal of this class is not only to discover how early humans lived and how civilizations developed and progressed but also to determine where and how Hollywood's version of history is both helpful and harmful. 

115.24, 13702 TR 9:25-10:40, Boucher
The Edge of the World. This course will survey the history of various societies from Antiquity to the late Middle Ages. While the material will help you develop a basic understanding of the pre-modern world and its history, the course will focus on the following question: How did various societies at the time imagine and describe regions located on their geographic periphery? As this class will show, pre-modern descriptions of distant lands often reveal more about the societies that produced them than about the places they intended to describe. Whether they were Ancient Greek poets or Medieval Irish monks, for instance, authors injected in these descriptions the values, anxieties, and fantasies that were common in their cultures of origin. As such, these texts provide revealing insights about past societies and the only means to appreciate them is to understand them in the historical and cultural context in which they were written.

115.25, 13703 TR 10:50-12:05, Boucher
The Edge of the World. This course will survey the history of various societies from Antiquity to the late Middle Ages. While the material will help you develop a basic understanding of the pre-modern world and its history, the course will focus on the following question: How did various societies at the time imagine and describe regions located on their geographic periphery? As this class will show, pre-modern descriptions of distant lands often reveal more about the societies that produced them than about the places they intended to describe. Whether they were Ancient Greek poets or Medieval Irish monks, for instance, authors injected in these descriptions the values, anxieties, and fantasies that were common in their cultures of origin. As such, these texts provide revealing insights about past societies and the only means to appreciate them is to understand them in the historical and cultural context in which they were written.

115.27, 13704 TR 9:50-10:40, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.28, 13705 TR 10:50-12:05, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.29, 16828 MWF 10-10:50, Schaffer
Pre-Modern Maritime Piracy. This course will explore the role maritime piracy played in shaping empires and kingdoms from Ancient Egypt to 16th-Century England. Pirates are often portrayed as villains or even comical heroes like Jack sparrow, but oceanic thievery and warfare has played a fundamental role in human history for thousands of years. Come learn how!

115.30, 14056 TR 12:15-1:30, Crosby
Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines.

115.33, 14055 TR3:05-4:20, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.35, 14007 TR1:40-2:55, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.37, 14337 MW 2:00-3:15 and ONLINE, Phillips
Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.41, 14057 TR 1:40-2:55, Crosby
Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines.

115.44, 14665 TR 8:00-9:15, Jones
Religion, Race, and the Making of the West. Religious violence and toleration were pressing concerns in the Middle Ages, just as they are today.  In this course, we will explore how medieval conceptions of religion and rights were tied to emerging ideas about nation and race in the development of European Christendom and its internal and external boundaries, laying the foundations for long-term discussions about human rights in the modern world.  The course will begin with examples of conflict and coexistence between Jews, Muslims, and Christians from the Roman Empire to the Middle Ages, and continue through the eventual consolidation of political rule and the fracturing of Latin Christendom in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries,  Topics include the development of medieval European society, changes in labor and slavery, the Crusades, heresy and conversion, the idea of race in the Middle Ages, the Inquisition, the European expulsions of Muslims and Jews, Black Africans in Europe, and the debates over the natural rights and self-determination of indigenous peoples and slaves in the New World. 

116.01, 16109 TR 12:15-1:30, Payne
The History of Global Capitalism. This course explores the rise and development of capitalism in Europe, Africa, and the Americas, from its beginnings in the Atlantic slave trade to the present. Students will learn how contemporary capitalism is not a fact of nature but has emerged through five centuries of human struggle. Topics include daily life under capitalism; the relationship between slavery and capitalism; the impact of capitalism on gender relations and the household; and the role of the state in creating and shaping markets. This course will cross disciplinary boundaries to introduce students to the history of global capitalism through music, film, literature, political science, and economics, but it will focus especially on training students in the historian’s craft. Students will develop a broad understanding of the historical dynamics of modern capitalism while also gaining the ability to identify and analyze primary sources, critique historical arguments, and conduct basic research in digital archives. In addition, students are expected to engage in learning beyond the classroom, through in-class field trips and by visiting additional historic sites throughout the semester.

116.02, 14336 TR 9:25-10:40, Cropper
The History of the Atlantic World, Climate Change, and the Anthropocene. This course focuses on the history of the Atlantic World and the Anthropocene from the fifteenth century to the present and will consider how broad historical processes of transformation and change, from the Age of Exploration and the Industrial Revolution to the Great Acceleration and Climate Change, have catalyzed a new epoch in human and natural history: the Anthropocene. First, we will explore large-scale historical process, such as the dynamism of precolonial African states, interpretations of African slavery, the transatlantic slave trade, the Age of Revolutions, and European conquest and colonialism. Second, we will consider the rise of European industrial nations and explore the various causes and effects of industrialization from the nineteenth century to present day. In focusing specifically on energy and natural resources, we will trace the development of the fossil fuel economy from its British origins to present day. In doing so, we will consider how various populations of the Atlantic World have contributed to anthropogenic climate change, and how exponential economic growth and intensive energy use have triggered unprecedented processes of environmental change. Indeed, one of the primary objectives of this course is to reflect on what it means to be living in this new epoch of natural history and how we—as humans—have arrived at this point. By considering the challenging realities of the Anthropocene, from climate change to environmental degradation and mass extinction, students will consider Earth as a global ecosystem that is shaped by a variety of dynamic and interactive systems—both natural and anthropogenic.

116.03, 14690 MWF 9-9:50, Tsahiridis
The American Wild West: Myths and Legacy. This course will examine the changing image of the American West from the arrival of Spanish conquistadors in the sixteenth century to present-day U.S. and Mexico. Special attention will be given to the interactions between indigenous peoples, settler colonists, and nation-states in the North American borderlands, as well as the West's portrayal in folklore, art, and films to show how popular impressions have reflected both national and international attitudes and values. 

116.05, 15298 MWF 10-10:50, Tsahiridis
The American Wild West: Myths and Legacy. This course will examine the changing image of the American West from the arrival of Spanish conquistadors in the sixteenth century to present-day U.S. and Mexico. Special attention will be given to the interactions between indigenous peoples, settler colonists, and nation-states in the North American borderlands, as well as the West's portrayal in folklore, art, and films to show how popular impressions have reflected both national and international attitudes and values. 

116.06, 15299 MWF 12-12:50, Tsahiridis
The American Wild West: Myths and Legacy. This course will examine the changing image of the American West from the arrival of Spanish conquistadors in the sixteenth century to present-day U.S. and Mexico. Special attention will be given to the interactions between indigenous peoples, settler colonists, and nation-states in the North American borderlands, as well as the West's portrayal in folklore, art, and films to show how popular impressions have reflected both national and international attitudes and values. 

116.07, 16113 TR 12:15-1:30, TBA
Modern History.

116.08, 13706 MWF 1-1:50, Haager
Immigration & Ethnicity. This course examines what it means to be an American and why the criterion for becoming an American has changed throughout U.S. history. We will consider why immigrants and migrants were perceived as racial and ethnic “others” and think critically about what it means to be a multiracial, multiethnic, and multicultural nation. This course will cover snapshots of major moments of immigration throughout U.S. history, beginning with colonial settlement and moving forward into the 20th century restrictions on immigration. The course will cover such historical developments as the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the National Origins Act of 1924, WWII developments like the Bracero Program and Japanese Internment, and the Immigration Act of 1965. We will conclude with a survey of recent developments in immigration reform like the detention of child migrants, family reunification, DREAMers, etc. Some themes that will be discussed are racism and nativism; push and pull factors for immigration; race and the law; urbanization and industrialization; work and class; gender and family dynamics; undocumented or illegal immigration; and chain, circular, and return migration patterns. Course readings will consist of letters, memoirs, diaries, and newspaper articles written by immigrants and oral interviews of immigrants, as well as a variety of secondary readings on immigration that discuss how race, class, and gender factored into the immigration process and settlement. Students will also be given an opportunity to use ancestry.com to research their family or conduct an oral interview with a recent immigrant and examine that immigrant’s history as it relates to the course themes. 

116.09, 15591 MWF 1-1:50, Tsahiridis
The American Wild West: Myths and Legacy. This course will examine the changing image of the American West from the arrival of Spanish conquistadors in the sixteenth century to present-day U.S. and Mexico. Special attention will be given to the interactions between indigenous peoples, settler colonists, and nation-states in the North American borderlands, as well as the West's portrayal in folklore, art, and films to show how popular impressions have reflected both national and international attitudes and values. 

116.10, 16380 TR 1:40-2:55, TBA
Modern History. 

116.11, 14179 MWF 1-1:50, Smith
Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.12, 13707 MW 2:00-3:15, Pennebaker
Oppression and Resistance in the Black Atlantic World. This semester, we will survey historical encounters of people of African descent and their role in the development of the Black Atlantic World. By tracing the obstacles and accomplishments of Black people throughout time and space, we will learn about the key people and events that shaped the Black Experience between the 15th to 21st centuries. The following themes are central to our course: race, labor, class, gender, sexuality, resistance, protest, community, and culture.

116.13, 16486 TR 10:50-12:05, Covert
History and Memory. This course explores modern history through the lens of history and memory. We will analyze how individuals, institutions, and governments have sought to remember or tried to forget historical events, people, and artifacts in modern world history ranging from Columbus’s arrival in the Caribbean to the present. In addition to learning about such historical topics as imperialism, authoritarianism, slavery, and war, then, students will also grapple with the political and economic implications of history and how it is commemorated, represented, or erased. This course will introduce students to broad historical currents in modern history and enable them to think more critically about history as a process, rather than as a static list of names and dates.

116.14, 13708 MW 3:25-4:40, Pennebaker
Oppression and Resistance in the Black Atlantic World. This semester, we will survey historical encounters of people of African descent and their role in the development of the Black Atlantic World. By tracing the obstacles and accomplishments of Black people throughout time and space, we will learn about the key people and events that shaped the Black Experience between the 15th to 21st centuries. The following themes are central to our course: race, labor, class, gender, sexuality, resistance, protest, community, and culture.

116.15, 15592 TR 8:00-9:15, Poole
Histories of Satan, Histories of Evil. “Those Who Consider the Devil to be a partisan of evil and angels to be the warriors of the good have accepted the demagoguery of angels. The case is clearly more complicated.” - Milan Kundera. Do you ever use the word evil? If so, for what kind of acts, experiences, people? Can you imagine that the idea of evil has a history like war or democracy? Have Americans and Europeans been obsessed with the Devil in the distant past as the embodiment of evil? Has this changed? What do you think of the idea that the notion of Satan is actually more important to many Americans than it has been in the past? Do you agree or disagree with this? What is the history of this idea and what is its meaning for the present? How will you define the idea of evil after you learn its history?

116.16, 17002 MWF 1-1:50, Gordanier
East Asian History Through Performing Arts: From Kunqu to K-Pop and Beyond. The performing arts in premodern East Asia were more than just entertainment: music, dance, story, and acting were tools for education, social networking, diplomacy, and religious ritual, but they were also (according to authorities), dangerous vehicles for corruption, sedition, and debauchery. What makes performance so powerful even today? This course uses theater, dance, music, and other performance forms as a window on East Asian history and society from premodern times to the present day, with a particular focus on China, Korea, and Japan in the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. We will investigate the ways performing arts conveyed, transgressed, or even shaped ideas about how people ought to think and live; the audiences these performances reached; and the people who brought them to life.

116.17, 13709 ONLINE, Ingram
Race and Imperialism in America. In this course we will explore efforts to both support and challenge ideas about empire by studying global conflicts, cultural revolutions, and major social movements in the U.S. and abroad between the 1890s and the present. By re-thinking topics such as western imperialism alongside Jim Crow segregation in the U.S.; international Cold War Diplomacy alongside the American Civil Rights Movement; and American proxy wars within the context of decolonization, we will re-evaluate major events in American History during Long Twentieth Century within a global context. While this class focuses on a ~125-year period, we will explore a much broader period for most of the topics we study in order to better understand the historical contexts in which they occurred.

116.19, 13711 MWF 10-10:50, Gigova
FROM SUBJECT TO CITIZEN: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. Through primary sources, lectures and discussions, we will explore the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over the course of the semester we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

116.20, 13712 MW 2:00-3:15, Luquer
Revolutions in the Modern World. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the continuities and discontinuities of change and connection. We will start in the latter part of the Renaissance (ca. 1450) as Europe begins a new relationship with the greater world, while the European continent suffers from the divisions in religion and war as it enters the modern era. This course will follow the religious, social and political upheavals of the modern era. The material in this course includes the Protestant Reformation, the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the French Wars of Religion and the Thirty Years War, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, both the American and French Revolutions, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries.

116.21, 13713 MW 3:25-4:40, Luquer
Revolutions in the Modern World. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the continuities and discontinuities of change and connection. We will start in the latter part of the Renaissance (ca. 1450) as Europe begins a new relationship with the greater world, while the European continent suffers from the divisions in religion and war as it enters the modern era. This course will follow the religious, social and political upheavals of the modern era. The material in this course includes the Protestant Reformation, the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the French Wars of Religion and the Thirty Years War, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, both the American and French Revolutions, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries.

116.22, 14343 TR 10:50-12:05, Cropper
The History of the Atlantic World, Climate Change, and the Anthropocene. This course focuses on the history of the Atlantic World and the Anthropocene from the fifteenth century to the present and will consider how broad historical processes of transformation and change, from the Age of Exploration and the Industrial Revolution to the Great Acceleration and Climate Change, have catalyzed a new epoch in human and natural history: the Anthropocene. First, we will explore large-scale historical process, such as the dynamism of precolonial African states, interpretations of African slavery, the transatlantic slave trade, the Age of Revolutions, and European conquest and colonialism. Second, we will consider the rise of European industrial nations and explore the various causes and effects of industrialization from the nineteenth century to present day. In focusing specifically on energy and natural resources, we will trace the development of the fossil fuel economy from its British origins to present day. In doing so, we will consider how various populations of the Atlantic World have contributed to anthropogenic climate change, and how exponential economic growth and intensive energy use have triggered unprecedented processes of environmental change. Indeed, one of the primary objectives of this course is to reflect on what it means to be living in this new epoch of natural history and how we—as humans—have arrived at this point. By considering the challenging realities of the Anthropocene, from climate change to environmental degradation and mass extinction, students will consider Earth as a global ecosystem that is shaped by a variety of dynamic and interactive systems—both natural and anthropogenic.

116.23, 15625 TR 7:00-8:15 p.m., Fors
Conflict and Diplomacy in the Americas, 1790-1990. In this global history course we will explore the rise of the United States as a world power and follow the development of that power from the Early Republic through the late 20th century in the context of the nation’s involvement in Latin America. Focusing on the Americas, we will explore relations between the United States, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central America; the effects of U.S. military and economic power on the region; and how U.S. actions related to U.S. rhetoric regarding democracy, liberty, and equality. We will also consider how U.S. policy shaped the region and impacted the economies, the politics, and people there and how countries in the region reacted to U.S. intervention.

116.24, 13714 MWF 9-9:50, Gordanier
East Asian History Through Performing Arts: From Kunqu to K-Pop and Beyond. The performing arts in premodern East Asia were more than just entertainment: music, dance, story, and acting were tools for education, social networking, diplomacy, and religious ritual, but they were also (according to authorities), dangerous vehicles for corruption, sedition, and debauchery. What makes performance so powerful even today? This course uses theater, dance, music, and other performance forms as a window on East Asian history and society from premodern times to the present day, with a particular focus on China, Korea, and Japan in the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. We will investigate the ways performing arts conveyed, transgressed, or even shaped ideas about how people ought to think and live; the audiences these performances reached; and the people who brought them to life.

116.25, 16668 MWF 11-11:50 and ONLINE, Slater
Women, Gender, and Race in Modern History. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of women, gender, race, and sexualities in relation to the rise of Western Civilization. The focus will be on gendered liberties. Studying the various roles of women and their relationships to men provide a unique lens through which to understand the rise of Europe and the Western world.  The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage women’s role in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexualities.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint) and discussion.  You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

116.26, 16775 MWF 11-11:50, Haager
Immigration & Ethnicity. This course examines what it means to be an American and why the criterion for becoming an American has changed throughout U.S. history. We will consider why immigrants and migrants were perceived as racial and ethnic “others” and think critically about what it means to be a multiracial, multiethnic, and multicultural nation. This course will cover snapshots of major moments of immigration throughout U.S. history, beginning with colonial settlement and moving forward into the 20th century restrictions on immigration. The course will cover such historical developments as the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, the National Origins Act of 1924, WWII developments like the Bracero Program and Japanese Internment, and the Immigration Act of 1965. We will conclude with a survey of recent developments in immigration reform like the detention of child migrants, family reunification, DREAMers, etc. Some themes that will be discussed are racism and nativism; push and pull factors for immigration; race and the law; urbanization and industrialization; work and class; gender and family dynamics; undocumented or illegal immigration; and chain, circular, and return migration patterns. Course readings will consist of letters, memoirs, diaries, and newspaper articles written by immigrants and oral interviews of immigrants, as well as a variety of secondary readings on immigration that discuss how race, class, and gender factored into the immigration process and settlement. Students will also be given an opportunity to use ancestry.com to research their family or conduct an oral interview with a recent immigrant and examine that immigrant’s history as it relates to the course themes. 

116.27, 15620 TR 9:25-10:40, Poole
Histories of Satan, Histories of Evil. “Those Who Consider the Devil to be a partisan of evil and angels to be the warriors of the good have accepted the demagoguery of angels. The case is clearly more complicated.” - Milan Kundera. Do you ever use the word evil? If so, for what kind of acts, experiences, people? Can you imagine that the idea of evil has a history like war or democracy? Have Americans and Europeans been obsessed with the Devil in the distant past as the embodiment of evil? Has this changed? What do you think of the idea that the notion of Satan is actually more important to many Americans than it has been in the past? Do you agree or disagree with this? What is the history of this idea and what is its meaning for the present? How will you define the idea of evil after you learn its history?

116.28, 15621 TR 9:25-10:40, Crosby
Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved. The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.29, 15622 MW 4:00-5:15 p.m., Jenkins
Empires in the Modern West. This class covers the history of the Modern West, focusing on the rise and fall of empires. Along the way we’ll discuss colonialism, nationalism, industrialization, capitalism and war—all the things that helped hasten both the rise and the fall of empires. The empire has been a dominant form of government in the western world for over 4000 years. In this class we’ll discuss why, and question whether that’s changed.

116.30, 15623 MW 5:30-6:45 p.m., Jenkins
Empires in the Modern West. This class covers the history of the Modern West, focusing on the rise and fall of empires. Along the way we’ll discuss colonialism, nationalism, industrialization, capitalism and war—all the things that helped hasten both the rise and the fall of empires. The empire has been a dominant form of government in the western world for over 4000 years. In this class we’ll discuss why, and question whether that’s changed.

116.31, 13951 TR 1:40-2:55, Eaves
Slavery in the Americas. In this course, we will focus on one of the most important aspects of world history—slavery in the Atlantic World from its beginnings in the late 1400 to its abolition in the 1800s. With a broad regional scope, we will look at slavery and the slave trade on both sides of the Atlantic—in Africa, North and South America, and the Caribbean. Through the course, we will gain a better understanding of the significant role slavery, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and abolitionist movements played in shaping the Atlantic world socially, culturally, politically, and economically. We will pay particular attention to themes such as slave taking, resistance, agency, labor, gender, and enslaved community and family, and the slave economy. As we live in Charleston, one of the most significant ports through which thousands of Africans forcibly entered the would-be United States, we will pay particular attention to slavery in the southern region of the US, but will gain an appreciation for how slavery looked throughout the Caribbean and Brazil.

116.32, 15626 MWF 11-11:50 and ONLINE, Phillips
Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?

116.33, 15630 MWF 12-12:50 and ONLINE, Phillips
Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?

116.34, 15631 TR 10:50-12:05, Payne
The History of Global Capitalism. This course explores the rise and development of capitalism in Europe, Africa, and the Americas, from its beginnings in the Atlantic slave trade to the present. Students will learn how contemporary capitalism is not a fact of nature but has emerged through five centuries of human struggle. Topics include daily life under capitalism; the relationship between slavery and capitalism; the impact of capitalism on gender relations and the household; and the role of the state in creating and shaping markets. This course will cross disciplinary boundaries to introduce students to the history of global capitalism through music, film, literature, political science, and economics, but it will focus especially on training students in the historian’s craft. Students will develop a broad understanding of the historical dynamics of modern capitalism while also gaining the ability to identify and analyze primary sources, critique historical arguments, and conduct basic research in digital archives. In addition, students are expected to engage in learning beyond the classroom, through in-class field trips and by visiting additional historic sites throughout the semester.

116.37, 13733 MWF 10-10:50, Gordanier
East Asian History Through Performing Arts: From Kunqu to K-Pop and Beyond. The performing arts in premodern East Asia were more than just entertainment: music, dance, story, and acting were tools for education, social networking, diplomacy, and religious ritual, but they were also (according to authorities), dangerous vehicles for corruption, sedition, and debauchery. What makes performance so powerful even today? This course uses theater, dance, music, and other performance forms as a window on East Asian history and society from premodern times to the present day, with a particular focus on China, Korea, and Japan in the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. We will investigate the ways performing arts conveyed, transgressed, or even shaped ideas about how people ought to think and live; the audiences these performances reached; and the people who brought them to life.

116.38, 13984 MWF 8-8:50, Lary
Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.39, 13988 MWF 9-9:50, Lary
Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.40, 14178 MWF 12-12:50, Smith
Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.
 

201.01, 13422 MWF 10-10:50, Smith
United States to 1865. The purpose of this course is to incorporate peoples’ actions into the context of early American history, beginning with Native American contact and concluding with the final shots of the Civil War.  By weaving together the social, political, economic, and environmental aspects of the American experience, this course will seek to explain how and why particular people of various backgrounds crucially shaped a nation.  In doing so, we will see how Native Americans, colonists, the enslaved, and United States citizens transformed the land and each other while developing an overall American identity.  Ultimately, we will focus on the theme of freedom and answer the following question: what has freedom meant to Americans from initial settlement until the end of the Civil War, and how have those meanings changed over time? With a driving narrative of noteworthy and ordinary people, events, and institutions, this course will (hopefully) provide you with a concise, yet diverse, understanding of this nation’s evolution.

202.01, 16776 MWF 2-2:50, Haager
United States since 1865. This course offers a broad overview of US history from Reconstruction through the twenty-first century. Throughout this course, students will learn about industrialization, urbanization, suburbanization, immigration, political and social reform, consumption and mass culture, foreign policy and war, social movements such as women’s rights and civil rights, economic changes, and cultural shifts. We will pay particular attention to what it means to be a multiracial, multiethnic, multilingual, and multicultural democracy and explore how conceptions of race, class, gender, and sexuality changed during the twentieth century. Students will not only learn about the events that happened in the past, but also learn to think critically about how and why historians’ interpretations vary. To do this, we will compare primary source evidence with a wide variety of historians' interpretations of the past. We will discuss the role of objectivity in history and throughout the course learn to think, talk, and write like a historian. 

210.01, 14761 TR 3:05-4:20, Payne
Special Topic: The Civil War and Reconstruction in the Atlantic World. The U.S. Civil War was the most consequential war in the history of the nineteenth-century Atlantic World. It led to the deaths of more than 700,000 Americans and the destruction of chattel slavery throughout the Western Hemisphere. Abraham Lincoln believed that the Civil War ushered in a “new birth of freedom” throughout the Atlantic World. For that reason, this course will approach the Civil War not only as a second American Revolution but as an Atlantic Revolution. Topics include the rise of the U.S. as a leader of the international order; the emergence of abolitionism in the North Atlantic World; the secession crisis and the turn to military emancipation; and the hemispheric origins of Jim Crow. Throughout the semester, we will pay special attention to the role of Charleston in Civil War history. Students will investigate how South Carolinians ranging from Denmark Vesey to John C. Calhoun to Benjamin Tillman shaped the origins and outcomes of the war. By the end of the semester, students will be able to articulate original answers to major questions in Civil War historiography and explain the role of South Carolina in transforming the nineteenth-century Atlantic World. 

210.02, 14892 TR 9:25-10:40, Eaves
Special Topic: African American Sexuality from Slavey to Freedom. In this course, students will examine the impact of the intersections of gender, race, and sexuality in the lives of African Americans from the period of enslavement to freedom. Major topics will include the historic exploitation of black people’s sexuality to form race and racist ideology in the United States; the history of black sexual expressions and identities and LGBTQ liberation movements; and role of sexuality in the fight for political, economic, social equality. 

216.01, 15516 TR 1:40-2:55, Pennebaker
African American History to 1865. Beginning with the African background, this course surveys the experience of African Americans from the colonial era through the Civil War. Particular attention will be devoted to the Atlantic slave trade, the North American slave experience, free blacks, abolitionism and the social and political implications of the Civil War as these affected black people.

231.01, 13600 MWF10-10:50, Alwine
Ancient Greece

234.01, 16110 MWF 12-12:50, Jestice
Early Midde Ages. This is a course on the making of Europe, as new states grew in the wake of Rome’s political fall and Europe grappled creatively with the long shadow of the Roman Empire.  The course will start in 313 CE, when Christianity first became legal in the Roman Empire, and will end in about the year 1050.  Along the way, we will explore the rise of the institutional Church, the Carolingian Empire, and the last waves of barbarian invasions (Viking, Magyar, and Saracen).

241.01, 16120 MWF 1-1:50, Gibbs
Special Topic: The Holocaust

241.02, 15312 TR 10:50-12:05, Coy
Special Topic: Early Modern Britain. 
An examination of the cultural, social, and political history of early modern Britain, 1485-1715. Topics will include the reign of Henry VIII, the English Reformation, the Elizabethan period, the rise of the Stuarts, the English Civil War, the Restoration, and the Glorious Revolution.

241.04, 14754 MWF 11-11:50, Gibbs
Special Topic: The Holocaust
 

250.01, 14859 TR 1:40-2:55, Cropper
Special Topic: Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade. 
This course examines the history slavery and the trans-Atlantic slave trade in Africa and the Atlantic World from the fifteenth to nineteenth centuries. We will read primary sources, explore oral histories, and engage in the historiographical debates on slavery and the slave trade. We will also consider how scholars from a wide range of fields and disciplines have developed innovative methods to study slavery, and how many of these methods seek to amplify the voice of enslaved persons over time. Students will also examine the numerous thematic approaches to slavery, such as gender and sexuality, science and medicine, the transmission of knowledge from Africa to its diaspora, and the longstanding cultural, social, and political legacies of slavery in the Atlantic World.

255.01, 16137 TR 10:50-12:05, Delay
History of Reproduction in the Atlantic World.
In this course, students examine pregnancy, childbirth, reproduction, and motherhood in comparative history. The focus is on Europe and the Americas since 1600, with particular attention paid to Britain and the British colonies and former colonies. Specific topics covered include experiences of pregnancy; midwifery and nursing; contraception, abortion, and infanticide; the medicalization of childbirth; and the relationship between motherhood and the modern state. Students will explore not only women’s experiences of reproduction but also the larger political, social, and cultural meanings of pregnancy, birth, and motherhood.

261.01, 14445 TR 9:25-10:40, Ayalon
History of Israel.

261.02, 15271 TR 12:15-1:30, Covert
Special Topic: Revolutionary Lives. 
This course examines revolutionary movements in Latin America’s long Cold War through a biographical approach. We will explore how individuals navigated periods of upheaval and violence, how their revolutionary ideologies challenged or transformed how they thought about and formulated their own gender identities, and how they imagined different futures for themselves and their communities

270.01, 14860 TR 12:15-1:30, Piccione
Special Topic: ANCIENT EGYPT, NUBIA AND KUSHThis course surveys the history of the ancient Nile Valley, including: the Kingdom of Egypt, the tribal societies of Nubia, and the Kingdom of Kush from prehistoric times through the fourth century A.D. (the fall of Kush). The intent of this course is to provide an integrated perspective of Nilotic civilizations--to view Nile Valley civilizations as a cultural entity--by placing Egypt within its African context, and exploring its cultural, ethnic and political relations with Nubia and Kush. The course will examine the issues of origins, ethnicities, languages, as well as similarities and differences among Egyptians, Nubians and Kushites. The approach will be to integrate the history of the valley civilizations into a single historical narrative. It will also assess the political tensions between Egypt and her southern neighbors, placing her repeated conquests of Nubia and Kush into the larger picture of Egyptian imperial history and comparing that process with Egypt's conquests in Western Asia (Canaan, Palestine and Syria). The course will focus as much on material culture and archaeology as on primary historical texts and inscriptions. With the permission of the appropriate program director, this course might also be applied to credits in Archaeology and African Studies.

276.01, 16111 TR 9:25-10:40 and ONLINE, Mikati
Islamic Civilization. 
The prophet Muhammad and the rise of Islam, its institutions, doctrines, politics, and cultural achievements. Decline of the Arab Muslim Empire and Caliphate, the Mongol invasions and development of separate Mamluk, Persian and Turkish states.

299.01, 13592 TR 12:15-1:30, Poole
Historian's Craft. The Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

299.02, 13678 TR 9:25-10:40, Jones
Historian's Craft. The Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

321.01, 17000 MW 2:00-3:15, Crabtree
History of Israel.

348.01, 16309 MWF 1:00-1:50, Gigova
Everyday Communism. In this class we will read about, watch and discuss the experience of millions who lived in the Soviet zone of influence after WWII. We will trace the metamorphosis of communism from a 19th-century ideology to practical policies and their impact on East Europeans.  In the process we will explore topics as diverse as the party-state, terror, class lifestyles, women’s “double burden,” socialist fashion and consumption, youth culture and music, the appeal of the West, dissidence, revolution and systemic transition.

350.01, 14894 TR 1:40-2:55, Boucher
Special Topic: France in Colonial North America. 
This course will survey the history of the French colonial presence in North America to 1763. Among other topics, it will examine the rationales of French colonialism in the region, the socio-political structure of colonial communities, and the nature of French relations with Native Americans as well as neighboring European powers. This course will also allow students to hone their skills in historical research and writing.

350.02, 16116 MW 2:00-3:15, Shanes
Special Topic: Jewish Mysticism.

350.03, 16117 TR 10:50-12:05, Ayalon
Special Topic: Jews & Muslims: Coexistence.

410.01, 11619 TR 10:50-12:05 and ONLINE, Ingram
Research Seminar: Crime and Punishment in America. This is the capstone research seminar for history majors. Your primary objective this semester is to produce an original, carefully researched, and well written ~25-30 page research paper based on the theme of the course: crime and punishment in the modern U.S. This course uses an array of historical monographs, novels, and films to explore the contested meanings of crime and the evolution of the carceral state since the late nineteenth century. Although we will study a few well-known crimes, we will also examine incidents that have largely been forgotten in order to examine how and why popular ideas and anxieties about crime (and criminals) have changed over time, how these have shaped ideas about what constitutes appropriate forms of punishment, and how the justice system reflects major social, political, and cultural developments in U.S. History.

470.01, 16121 MW 2:00-3:15, Jestice
Research Seminar: Monarchy. This capstone course will be focused on the theme of monarchy. There will be some common readings to ground students in the central issues of the topic, but the bulk of the course is an extended, mentored research project that will produce a 30-page work of original research. Students will choose a topic in consultation with the instructor—from any period and culture for which there is sufficient material. Note that the projects will be focused on issues of monarchy, rather than intended to produce biographies.