Fall 2021 Courses

Course Descriptions

103.01, 10765 TR 8-9:15, Crosby
World History from 1500 CE to Present. History 104 will cover world history from 1500 CE to the present, and covers the chief political, social, economic, cultural, and religious developments in that period. The objectives of the course are to examine the interaction between different cultures with differing worldviews, globalization (the increasing interconnection between economies, societies, and their ideas), and the effects of industrialization, modernization, imperialism, decolonization, and their consequences, and the effects of the two world war.

115.01, 10836 MWF 12-12:50, Van Meer
A World of Inventions. This course explores the history of our world, from the first hunter-gatherer societies until the dawn of modernity in the 15th century, using the comparative method. The theme of this global history course is invention and technology. By contextualizing key inventions of the past, e.g. prehistoric cave paintings, early Egyptian and Chinese tombs, classical Greek and Roman (amphi)theaters, and medieval Byzantine and Islamic Domes, we will analyze how technological developments reflect the cultural/religious values, political power, and gender/social beliefs of their respective societies.

115.02, 11693 MW 3:25-4:40, Phillips
Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.03, 10715 MWF 11-11:50, Jestice
War in the Premodern World. Warfare has been a frequent human activity since Neolithic times, and many societies throughout history have been shaped purposefully to make their citizens the most effective possible fighting machines.  This course will take a broad view of warfare from c. 2000 BCE to the time when increasingly effective gunpowder weapons transformed the face of war in the 15th century CE.  The emphasis of the class will be on the Near East and Europe, with occasional comparative looks at other parts of the globe.

115.04, 11694 MWF 11-11:50, Luquer
State and Religion. History 115 is a thematically-driven premodern history class, intended to hone analytical thinking and writing skills while exploring an important aspect of world history.  The theme of this class is religion and state building---how the two have woven together in antiquity and through the middle ages to create distinctive cultures based on religion. We will focus on the development of origin stories that help the indigenous peoples of the world develop and answer the questions they had about their surroundings. We will also examine how these stories developed into polytheistic and then the monotheistic religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, after the fall of imperial Rome by the Carolingian empire and medieval humanists, as well as the changing landscape of religion and government through the end of the middle ages.

115.05, 10716 TR 10:50-12:05, Piccione
History, Legend and Mythology. This course surveys the major civilizations of the ancient world through the lens of legend and mythology. Beginning with Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, it continues through the Minoans, Greeks and Romans (up to. AD 476). It focuseson the major myths and legends of these societies, including early creation mythologies, Egyptian and Mesopotamian legends of the gods and heroes, and legendary tales from Greece and Rome. Topics include the historical foundations of many of these legends, and the extent to which later legends of the Greeks and Romans were influenced by–or adapted from–earlier myths and legends of Egypt and the East. In this manner, the course explores not only what legends and mythology reveal about these historical civilizations, but also how those societies viewed themselves.

115.06, 10717 TR 9:25-10:40, Boucher
The Edge of the World. This course will survey the history of various societies from Antiquity to the late Middle Ages. While the material will help you develop a basic understanding of the pre-modern world and its history, the course will focus on the following question: How did various societies at the time imagine and describe regions located on their geographic periphery? As this class will show, pre-modern descriptions of distant lands often reveal more about the societies that produced them than about the places they intended to describe. Whether they were Ancient Greek poets or Medieval Irish monks, for instance, authors injected in these descriptions the values, anxieties, and fantasies that were common in their cultures of origin. As such, these texts provide revealing insights about past societies and the only means to appreciate them is to understand them in the historical and cultural context in which they were written.

115.07, 10718 TR 10:50-12:05, Boucher
The Edge of the World. This course will survey the history of various societies from Antiquity to the late Middle Ages. While the material will help you develop a basic understanding of the pre-modern world and its history, the course will focus on the following question: How did various societies at the time imagine and describe regions located on their geographic periphery? As this class will show, pre-modern descriptions of distant lands often reveal more about the societies that produced them than about the places they intended to describe. Whether they were Ancient Greek poets or Medieval Irish monks, for instance, authors injected in these descriptions the values, anxieties, and fantasies that were common in their cultures of origin. As such, these texts provide revealing insights about past societies and the only means to appreciate them is to understand them in the historical and cultural context in which they were written.

115.08, 10719 MWF 9-9:50, Crout
THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.09, 10720 MWF 11-11:50, Crout
THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.10, 10721 TR 9:25-10:40, Mikati
Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.11, 10722 TR 10:50-12:05, Mikati
Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.12, 10723 TR 12:15-1:30, Delay
Feast and Famine. This general education course examines pre-modern history through the topics of food and hunger. It asks how individuals, families, communities, and nations have created food culture, experienced both abundance and famine. It is comparative in focus, with a particular emphasis on Europe and the Americas. Specific topics covered include food and folklore, food traditions, food and religion, hospitality, childhood and food culture, kitchens as cooking spaces, and debates about the causes and effects of famine throughout time and space. Throughout the semester, we will read a variety of works, including writings by historians, primary-source documents, and memoirs.

115.15, 10726 TR 1:40-2:55 and ONLNE, Jones
Religion, Race, and the Making of the West. Religious violence and toleration were pressing concerns in the Middle Ages, just as they are today.  In this course, we will explore how medieval conceptions of religion and rights were tied to emerging ideas about nation and race in the development of European Christendom and its internal and external boundaries, laying the foundations for long-term discussions about human rights in the modern world.  The course will begin with examples of conflict and coexistence between Jews, Muslims, and Christians from the Roman Empire to the Middle Ages, and continue through the eventual consolidation of political rule and the fracturing of Latin Christendom in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries,  Topics include the development of medieval European society, changes in labor and slavery, the Crusades, heresy and conversion, the idea of race in the Middle Ages, the Inquisition, the European expulsions of Muslims and Jews, Black Africans in Europe, and the debates over the natural rights and self-determination of indigenous peoples and slaves in the New World. 

115.16, 10728 TR 3:05-4:20 and ONLNE, Jones
Religion, Race, and the Making of the West. Religious violence and toleration were pressing concerns in the Middle Ages, just as they are today.  In this course, we will explore how medieval conceptions of religion and rights were tied to emerging ideas about nation and race in the development of European Christendom and its internal and external boundaries, laying the foundations for long-term discussions about human rights in the modern world.  The course will begin with examples of conflict and coexistence between Jews, Muslims, and Christians from the Roman Empire to the Middle Ages, and continue through the eventual consolidation of political rule and the fracturing of Latin Christendom in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries,  Topics include the development of medieval European society, changes in labor and slavery, the Crusades, heresy and conversion, the idea of race in the Middle Ages, the Inquisition, the European expulsions of Muslims and Jews, Black Africans in Europe, and the debates over the natural rights and self-determination of indigenous peoples and slaves in the New World. 

115.17, 10729 MWF 12-12:50, Dingley
Maritime Cultures of the Indian Ocean World. From the Swahili city-states of the East African coast to the nomadic seafaring societies of the Southeast Asian archipelago, this course explores the cosmopolitan world of the Indian Ocean from antiquity through the rise of Islam to the arrival of the Portuguese in 1498. Our focus will be on the diasporic movement of people and plants, language and culture, religion and technology over two thousand years of maritime history, and the underlying environmental forces and institutional forms that helped make the Indian Ocean the most dynamic cultural crossroads of the pre-modern era.

115.18, 12296 MWF 12-12:50, Lary
History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in the ancient world. The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise. While we will address many ancient philosophies and religions in this course, the primary focus will be on three case studies: the empires of ancient Greece, ancient India, and ancient Persia. In ancient Greece, the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics through the Hellenistic thinkers will be highlighted and placed within the cultural and political context. In ancient India, we will pay particular attention to the development of the competing yet symbiotic teachings of ancient Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. Finally, our study of ancient Persia will begin with the history of ancient Zoroastrianism.

115.20, 10730 MWF 1-1:50, Dingley
Maritime Cultures of the Indian Ocean World. From the Swahili city-states of the East African coast to the nomadic seafaring societies of the Southeast Asian archipelago, this course explores the cosmopolitan world of the Indian Ocean from antiquity through the rise of Islam to the arrival of the Portuguese in 1498. Our focus will be on the diasporic movement of people and plants, language and culture, religion and technology over two thousand years of maritime history, and the underlying environmental forces and institutional forms that helped make the Indian Ocean the most dynamic cultural crossroads of the pre-modern era.

115.21, 12522 MWF 11-11:50, Lary
History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in the ancient world. The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise. While we will address many ancient philosophies and religions in this course, the primary focus will be on three case studies: the empires of ancient Greece, ancient India, and ancient Persia. In ancient Greece, the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics through the Hellenistic thinkers will be highlighted and placed within the cultural and political context. In ancient India, we will pay particular attention to the development of the competing yet symbiotic teachings of ancient Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. Finally, our study of ancient Persia will begin with the history of ancient Zoroastrianism.

115.24, 10731 TR 9:50-10:40, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.25, 10732 TR 10:50-12:05, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.27, 10733 TR 1:40-2:55, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.28, 10734 TR 3:05-4:20, Halvorson
Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.30, 11126 TR 3:05-4:20, Crosby
Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines.

115.33, 11125 TR 1:40-2:55, Crosby
Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines.

115.35, 11069 MWF 1-1:50, Van Meer
A World of Inventions. This course explores the history of our world, from the first hunter-gatherer societies until the dawn of modernity in the 15th century, using the comparative method. The theme of this global history course is invention and technology. By contextualizing key inventions of the past, e.g. prehistoric cave paintings, early Egyptian and Chinese tombs, classical Greek and Roman (amphi)theaters, and medieval Byzantine and Islamic Domes, we will analyze how technological developments reflect the cultural/religious values, political power, and gender/social beliefs of their respective societies.

115.37, 11464 MWF 10-10:50, Smith
A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.39, 11466 MW 2-3:15, Phillips
Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.41, 11127 MWF 9-9:50, Smith
A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.44, 11983 MWF 12-12:50, Luquer
State and Religion. History 115 is a thematically-driven premodern history class, intended to hone analytical thinking and writing skills while exploring an important aspect of world history.  The theme of this class is religion and state building---how the two have woven together in antiquity and through the middle ages to create distinctive cultures based on religion. We will focus on the development of origin stories that help the indigenous peoples of the world develop and answer the questions they had about their surroundings. We will also examine how these stories developed into polytheistic and then the monotheistic religions of Judaism, Christianity and Islam, after the fall of imperial Rome by the Carolingian empire and medieval humanists, as well as the changing landscape of religion and government through the end of the middle ages.

116.01, 10735 TR 8-9:15, Poole
Histories of Satan, Histories of Evil. “Those Who Consider the Devil to be a partisan of evil and angels to be the warriors of the good have accepted the demagoguery of angels. The case is clearly more complicated.” - Milan Kundera. Do you ever use the word evil? If so, for what kind of acts, experiences, people? Can you imagine that the idea of evil has a history like war or democracy? Have Americans and Europeans been obsessed with the Devil in the distant past as the embodiment of evil? Has this changed? What do you think of the idea that the notion of Satan is actually more important to many Americans than it has been in the past? Do you agree or disagree with this? What is the history of this idea and what is its meaning for the present? How will you define the idea of evil after you learn its history?

116.02, 11463 MWF 9-9:50, Lary
Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.03, 12026 MW 3:25-4:40, Luquer
Revolutions in the Modern World. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the continuities and discontinuities of change and connection. We will start in the latter part of the Renaissance (ca. 1450) as Europe begins a new relationship with the greater world, while the European continent suffers from the divisions in religion and war as it enters the modern era. This course will follow the religious, social and political upheavals of the modern era. The material in this course includes the Protestant Reformation, the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the French Wars of Religion and the Thirty Years War, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, both the American and French Revolutions, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries.

116.04, 11465 MWF 11-11:50, Phillips
Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?

116.05, 13432 MWF 9-9:50, Gordanier
East Asian History Through Performing Arts: From Kunqu to K-Pop and Beyond. The performing arts in premodern East Asia were more than just entertainment: music, dance, story, and acting were tools for education, social networking, diplomacy, and religious ritual, but they were also (according to authorities), dangerous vehicles for corruption, sedition, and debauchery. What makes performance so powerful even today? This course uses theater, dance, music, and other performance forms as a window on East Asian history and society from premodern times to the present day, with a particular focus on China, Korea, and Japan in the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. We will investigate the ways performing arts conveyed, transgressed, or even shaped ideas about how people ought to think and live; the audiences these performances reached; and the people who brought them to life.

116.06, 20427 MWF 10-10:50, Gordanier
East Asian History Through Performing Arts: From Kunqu to K-Pop and Beyond. The performing arts in premodern East Asia were more than just entertainment: music, dance, story, and acting were tools for education, social networking, diplomacy, and religious ritual, but they were also (according to authorities), dangerous vehicles for corruption, sedition, and debauchery. What makes performance so powerful even today? This course uses theater, dance, music, and other performance forms as a window on East Asian history and society from premodern times to the present day, with a particular focus on China, Korea, and Japan in the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. We will investigate the ways performing arts conveyed, transgressed, or even shaped ideas about how people ought to think and live; the audiences these performances reached; and the people who brought them to life.

116.07, 10735 TR 9:25-10:40, Poole
Histories of Satan, Histories of Evil. “Those Who Consider the Devil to be a partisan of evil and angels to be the warriors of the good have accepted the demagoguery of angels. The case is clearly more complicated.” - Milan Kundera. Do you ever use the word evil? If so, for what kind of acts, experiences, people? Can you imagine that the idea of evil has a history like war or democracy? Have Americans and Europeans been obsessed with the Devil in the distant past as the embodiment of evil? Has this changed? What do you think of the idea that the notion of Satan is actually more important to many Americans than it has been in the past? Do you agree or disagree with this? What is the history of this idea and what is its meaning for the present? How will you define the idea of evil after you learn its history?

116.08, 10737 MWF 1-1:50, Crout
MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD SINCE 1600: THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION. What do the material objects that are important to you tell others about who you are?  This course concentrates on the role objects (material culture) have played in defining who “we” are through studying the artifacts we leave behind such as architecture, household goods, art, foods, clothing, and style.  Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World since 1600.

116.10, 23589 ONLINE, Phillips
Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?

116.11, 11267 MWF 8-8:50, Lary
Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.12, 10738 MWF 9-9:50, Gigova
FROM SUBJECT TO CITIZEN: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. Through primary sources, lectures and discussions, we will explore the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over the course of the semester we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

116.14, 10739 MWF 9-9:50, Gigova
FROM SUBJECT TO CITIZEN: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. Through primary sources, lectures and discussions, we will explore the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over the course of the semester we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

116.16, 11467 MWF 12-12:50, Phillips
Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?

116.17, 10740 ONLINE, Ingram
Race and Imperialism in America. In this course we will explore efforts to both support and challenge ideas about empire by studying global conflicts, cultural revolutions, and major social movements in the U.S. and abroad between the 1890s and the present. By re-thinking topics such as western imperialism alongside Jim Crow segregation in the U.S.; international Cold War Diplomacy alongside the American Civil Rights Movement; and American proxy wars within the context of decolonization, we will re-evaluate major events in American History during Long Twentieth Century within a global context. While this class focuses on a ~125-year period, we will explore a much broader period for most of the topics we study in order to better understand the historical contexts in which they occurred.

116.18, 10741 MWF 11-11:50 and ONLINE, Slater
Women, Gender, and Race in Modern History. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of women, gender, race, and sexualities in relation to the rise of Western Civilization. The focus will be on gendered liberties. Studying the various roles of women and their relationships to men provide a unique lens through which to understand the rise of Europe and the Western world.  The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage women’s role in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexualities.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint) and discussion.  You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

116.19, 10742 TR 9:25-10:40, Covert
History and Memory. This course explores modern history through the lens of history and memory. We will analyze how individuals, institutions, and governments have sought to remember or tried to forget historical events, people, and artifacts in modern world history ranging from Columbus’s arrival in the Caribbean to the present. In addition to learning about such historical topics as imperialism, authoritarianism, slavery, and war, then, students will also grapple with the political and economic implications of history and how it is commemorated, represented, or erased. This course will introduce students to broad historical currents in modern history and enable them to think more critically about history as a process, rather than as a static list of names and dates.

116.20, 10743 TR 12:15-1:30, Crosby
Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved. The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.21, 10744 TR 1:40-2:55, Donaldson
Sing for Freedom. Music has been a ubiquitous feature in protest movements of the 19th through 20th centuries. Through song, protestors have been able to express their grievances and sustain their morale in their struggles for social, cultural, political, and economic change. Music, therefore, is an important historical text that provides access to understanding the circumstances that gave rise to protest movements and insight into the motivations of activist historical actors. In this course we will examine the history of protest movements in the United States and around the world through the songs that activists created, adapted, and shared among each other and across national borders. 

116.22, 11476 MW 2-3:15, Luquer
Revolutions in the Modern World. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the continuities and discontinuities of change and connection. We will start in the latter part of the Renaissance (ca. 1450) as Europe begins a new relationship with the greater world, while the European continent suffers from the divisions in religion and war as it enters the modern era. This course will follow the religious, social and political upheavals of the modern era. The material in this course includes the Protestant Reformation, the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the French Wars of Religion and the Thirty Years War, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, both the American and French Revolutions, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries.

116.24, 10745 TR 9:25-10:40 and ONLINE, Schaffer
Modern Piracy, 1500 - Present. This course examines global piracy from the 1500s-2000s, with a special focus on Anglo-American piracy and its intersection with imperial rivalries and colonization in the 1600s and 1700s. This course will cover how pirates challenged imperial goals in the Americas, Europe, Asia, Africa, and changed world history as we know it. After debunking the notion that pirates were a fun, treasure hunting, group of flamboyant adventurers, we will focus on how early modern and modern governments have dealt with this dangerous military threat throughout the last 500 years. As we will discover, pirates not only plagued empires, but became a special tool for empire building itself throughout the world.

116.31, 11010 MW 5:30-6:45, Luquer
Revolutions in the Modern World. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the continuities and discontinuities of change and connection. We will start in the latter part of the Renaissance (ca. 1450) as Europe begins a new relationship with the greater world, while the European continent suffers from the divisions in religion and war as it enters the modern era. This course will follow the religious, social and political upheavals of the modern era. The material in this course includes the Protestant Reformation, the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the French Wars of Religion and the Thirty Years War, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, both the American and French Revolutions, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries.

116.37, 10768 TR 10:50-12:05 and ONLINE, Schaffer
Modern Piracy, 1500 - Present. This course examines global piracy from the 1500s-2000s, with a special focus on Anglo-American piracy and its intersection with imperial rivalries and colonization in the 1600s and 1700s. This course will cover how pirates challenged imperial goals in the Americas, Europe, Asia, Africa, and changed world history as we know it. After debunking the notion that pirates were a fun, treasure hunting, group of flamboyant adventurers, we will focus on how early modern and modern governments have dealt with this dangerous military threat throughout the last 500 years. As we will discover, pirates not only plagued empires, but became a special tool for empire building itself throughout the world.

116.38, 11043 MW 7-8:15, Jenkins
Modern History.

116.39, 11049 TR 10:50-12:05, Crosby
Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved. The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.40, 11265 MWF 1-1:50, Smith
Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

201.01, 10426 MWF 12-12:50, Smith
United States to 1865. The purpose of this course is to incorporate peoples’ actions into the context of early American history, beginning with Native American contact and concluding with the final shots of the Civil War.  By weaving together the social, political, economic, and environmental aspects of the American experience, this course will seek to explain how and why particular people of various backgrounds crucially shaped a nation.  In doing so, we will see how Native Americans, colonists, the enslaved, and United States citizens transformed the land and each other while developing an overall American identity.  Ultimately, we will focus on the theme of freedom and answer the following question: what has freedom meant to Americans from initial settlement until the end of the Civil War, and how have those meanings changed over time? With a driving narrative of noteworthy and ordinary people, events, and institutions, this course will (hopefully) provide you with a concise, yet diverse, understanding of this nation’s evolution.

210.01, 12302 MWF 1-1:50 and ONLINE, Slater
Special Topic: History of Appalachia. Over the course of the semester students will be introduced to the history of Appalachia, primarily central Appalachia in Kentucky, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. We will discuss and investigate the cultures and relationships from indigenous societies, the arrival of the Scots-Irish in the 18th century, opening of the Cumberland Gap, politics of the 19th century and spend considerable time on the 20th century. We will spend time discussing settlement and the long hunters, such as Daniel Boone. The 20th century in particularly shaped the course of Appalachia. The coal industry, exploitive labor practices, and failure of the federal government to alleviate systemic poverty and lack of industry as coal mining disappeared as a viable source of energy. This course will discuss the environmental consequences of coal, the mining wars, society and culture, and the role of religion in its unique identity. Students will also be introduced to the music, art, literature, food, and customs through interdisciplinary material and interactive engagement.

210.02, 12958 MWF 2-2:50, Walters
Special Topic: Bombs, Bolsheviks and Birth Control: Jews and the Radical Left 

211.01, 12998 ONLINE, Stiefel
American Urban History

215.01, 12912 TR 1:40-2:55, Boucher
Native American History. A chronological survey in Native American History north of Mexico to the 21st century. This course examines the Native American contribution to the history of the continent and exposes students to the ethnohistoric method, an approach designed to study the history of people who have left no written record.

216.01, 13701 TR 1:40-2:55 and ONLINE, Pennebaker
African American History to 1865. Beginning with the African background, this course surveys the experience of African Americans from the colonial era through the Civil War. Particular attention will be devoted to the Atlantic slave trade, the North American slave experience, free blacks, abolitionism and the social and political implications of the Civil War as these affected black people.

231.01, 10625 TR 8-9:15, Flores
Ancient Greece

241.01, 13449 MWF 12-12:50, TBA
Special Topic: The Holocaust

241.04, 12277 MWF 1-1:50, TBA
Special Topic: The Holocaust
 

250.01, 12913 MWF 12-12:50, Jestice
Special Topic: The Viking Age. A study of the Viking attacks on Europe and how they reshaped European society. Starting in the 790s, Scandinavian raiders began over a century of devastating raids against much of western Europe—and Europe was never the same again. Viking raids led to the fragmentation of France, but the consolidation of England into a single monarchy. Scandinavians settled in significant numbers in England, Scotland, Normandy, and Ireland (where they created the first towns). Further to the east, mostly Swedish raiders launched bold attacks as far as Constantinople, but also created the first Russian principalities. This course explores Viking attacks as one of the greatest catalysts for European change, helping to create the distinctive states of the high Middle Ages, as well as considering how the Vikings both developed out of Scandinavian conditions and helped change them.

261.01, 11613 MW 2-3:15, Cropper
Special Topic: The Environmental History of Africa. Since the nineteenth century, African environments have been understood through stories of decline and degradation—establishing narratives of how Africans consistently destroyed their “pristine” and “Edenic” environments. To be sure, images of soil erosion, desiccation, deforestation, and famines have, in large part, shaped much of the way the world, and the West in particular, understand Africa. This course will consider an alternative perspective of Africa’s environment by focusing on the dynamic and complex processes of environmental change from the start of the nineteenth century to the present. We will draw on historical texts, novels, and films from multiple regions of the continent to explore how Africans understood, exploited, and managed their natural environments. By adopting an African “point of view,” this course will attempt to address some of the grave misconceptions that have led so many to believe that Africa was, and continues to be, a “Dark Continent.” Furthermore, students will be encouraged to think critically about the meaning of “environmental crisis” and how that trope has served various political and cultural projects over time. But we will also seriously consider the ways in which human beings have, from the colonial period through the present day, taxed natural resources in ways that have produced profound short and long-term consequences.

261.02, 13404 MWF 10-10:50, Dingley
Special Topic: African Economic History. This course provides students with an introduction to the economic history of sub-Saharan Africa from the precolonial period to the present. Our focus throughout will be what large-scale economic processes mean to ordinary people. How is value produced, exchanged, and consumed? How is the economy embedded in other domains of life, such as kinship, religion, and politics? Moving between macro- and micro-scales, we will explore (among other topics): the Atlantic Slave Trade; colonial transformations of concepts of ownership, property, and wealth; “conflict minerals” and counterfeit currencies; theories of development and dependency; “corruption” and “hyperinflation;” mobile money platforms and direct cash transfers; structural adjustment programs and “occult economies;” migrant labor relations and marriage payment negotiations. No prior background in economic theory or African history will be needed or presumed.

263.01, 11814 TR 12:15-1:30, Covert
Latin America since Independence. This course focuses on the history of Latin America from the wars of independence to the present.  Because of the large geographical and chronological scope, this course will not concentrate solely on specific events and leaders. Rather, it will take a comparative approach with an emphasis on the broader political, economic, and cultural themes that connect or differentiate particular national histories. Ultimately this course seeks to provide students with a better understanding of Latin America’s historical trajectory and, as a result, a better understanding of the integral role Latin America plays in the world today. This is a sustainability-related course.

270.01, 12914 TR 12:15-1:30, Piccione
Special Topic: Ancient Egyptian Empires. Combining texts and archaeology, this course centers on the history and character of the ancient Egyptian imperial experience in Middle Kingdom (Dynasties 12-13), ca. 1991-1668 BC, and the New Kingdom (Dynasties 18-20), c. 1570-1070 BC. Topics include: development of empire, political organization, military issues (history, technology, etc.), great battles (Megiddo, Kadesh, etc.), policies toward Nubia and Asia, and rising economic wealth. Also included are: social and intellectual advances, cosmopolitan life at home, growing cultural sophistication, ethnic integration, influence of foreign ideas, religious issues and experimentation, the cult of the Aten and the Amarna experience. An important issue is contact with the Minoans and Mycenaeans, battles against Mycenaean raiders, and use of Mycenaean mercenaries (reflected in Egyptian texts and the Iliad). Finally is the retreat from empire, including the Sea People wars, Philistine client states, and the rising threat from Nubia and Assyria.

282.01, 11812 MWF 1-1:50, Gordanier
History of China to 1800. This is a chronological and thematic introduction to the history of premodern China, from Neolithic times to the end of the Ming dynasty in the seventeenth century. No prior background in history or East Asian studies is required. Lectures and class discussions will pay particular attention to the formation and development of the patterns by which people living in this region organized and made sense of their lives: systems of political power and social structure (the family, the state, etc.), systems of thought, belief, and ethics (Confucianism, Daoism, Buddhism, etc.), and cultural priorities and achievements (arts and letters, technology, commerce, etc.). On our journey from the Stone and Bronze Ages to the gunpowder age, we will develop a sense of the diversity, continuities, and roads-not-taken during the millennia in which the very concept of “China,” as we now know it, began to take shape.

291.01, 12915 TR 9:25-10:40, Steere-Williams
Disease, Medicine, and History. This course investigates the changing meanings and entanglements of medical science, public health, and medical practice from the 18th century. We will examine ideas about the body and disease, the changing role and image of medicine in American and European life. Key themes we will examine include alternative medicine, the growth of medicine’s cultural authority, medical professionalization, the rise of public health, hospital care, and imperial and colonial medicine. We will probe these issues through the lenses of class, race, gender, age, lifestyle, and place in terms of health. Though the focus of the class is on the western medicine, throughout the course we will be making transnational and global comparisons. Your overall assessment in this class depends on your class participation and writing. You will work to sharpen your verbal and argumentative skills in frequent class discussions, and your writing skills through the formal study of some practical problems of expository writing and by revising essays that you write on topics raised in our historical discussion.

299.01, 10616 MWF 2-2:50, Jestice
Historian's Craft. The Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

299.02, 10704 TR 10:50-12:05, Coy
Historian's Craft. The Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

310.01, 11695 TR 12:15-1:40, Poole
Special Topic: Nam: The Vietnam War in American Memory and Culture, 1950-2002We will examine the Vietnam War in American cultural history by thinking about how veterans, members of the youth movement, African American leaders, political figures, and the broad American public imagined the outcome and meaning of the conflict. The period encompasses the earliest American involvement that supported French claims to the colony and goes forward through and beyond 1975 to look at how the conflict reconfigured both politics and popular culture into the Post-9/11 era. The class will look at materials as divergent as veteran memoirs, films, music and political rhetoric surrounding the war. You will have the opportunity to do research on primary sources that shaped what Americans of different backgrounds and political beliefs thought the Vietnam War meant and how everything from evangelical religion to American gun culture, to US intervention abroad came to be seen through the prism of popular culture representations of "'Nam".

320.01, 13638 T 5:30-8:15, Stockton
ST: Modern Charleston. Modern Charleston – an oxymoron? Actually Charleston has had a diverse history - sometimes sleepy, sometimes dynamic, and sometimes both at the same time – during the twentieth century, and initial years of the twenty-first. Explore economic, cultural, political, demographic, and other factors in the history of a resilient city.

336.01, 11811 TR 10:50-12:05 and ONLINE, Jones
Italian Renaissance. This course is an examination of the cultural, social, and political developments of the Renaissance in Italy and its impact on the rest of Europe. Topics will include the Italian city-states, despots and republics, humanism from Petrarch to Machiavelli, Papal Rome, and Renaissance art and
architecture. We will examine how the Renaissance relates to the educational, artistic, mercantile, financial, religious, social, and political upheavals in Italy and Europe from the thirteenth to the sixteenth centuries. Additionally, this course will explore what the Renaissance was on its own terms and the role this self-definition has played in our comprehension of both the past and the present.

347.01, 13445 TR 3:05-4:20, Delay
Special Topic: Modern Ireland. In this course, students will explore the history of Ireland since 1798. We will analyze the social, cultural, economic, intellectual, religious, and political developments that have shaped Ireland’s history. We will also ask how and why the people of Ireland have attempted to define both themselves and their nation and how Irish identities have changed in the past and continue to change today. Specific topics covered include war and rebellion, the impact of the Great Famine, nationalism, religion, the “Troubles” in Northern Ireland, Ireland’s relationship with Britain and the rest of Europe, migrations past and present, the Irish diaspora, gender and sexuality, and the role of rural and urban landscapes in Ireland’s history.

350.01, 12960 TR 1:40-2:55, Shanes
Special Topic: Modern Jewish Politics. 

441.01, 11813 TR 9:25-10:40, Gigova
Research Seminar: The Cold War in Europe. This course enables history majors to complete a research paper within the field of 20th-century European history. The topic of the Cold War is broad enough to embrace different countries and areas of investigation: diplomatic, political, economic, social and cultural.

450.01, 12918 TR 12:15-1:30, Mikati
Research Seminar: Histories of Slavery: Pre-Modern and Global. In this senior capstone seminar, students will plan, research, and write a 25–30 page seminar paper on a topic of their own choice connected to the history of slavery, with a focus on slavery beyond the Atlantic world. In this course we will examine the practice of enslavement and the lives and experiences of the enslaved in the context of the ancient, medieval, and premodern world.