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Spring 2017 Course Offerings

Course Descriptions

104.01, 21238 MWF 8-8:50  Crosby

World History from 1500 CE to Present. History 104 will cover world history from 1500 CE to the present, and covers the chief political, social, economic, cultural, and religious developments in that period. The objectives of the course are to examine the interaction between different cultures with differing worldviews, globalization (the increasing interconnection between economies, societies, and their ideas), and the effects of industrialization, modernization, imperialism, decolonization, and their consequences, and the effects of the two world war.

115.01, 20560 MWF 8-8:50  Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly?  What does each one tell us about you?  This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.02, 20561 MWF 9-9:50  Crosby

Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of  society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines. 

115.03, 20563 MW 9-9:50  Halvorson

Religion - OMGs! How did humankind move from hunter-gatherers in Africa to creating some of the most advanced civilizations and religions in history? This course teaches the student about the beginnings of the world's most renowned civilizations through the lens of their otherworldly beliefs. Other topics are also explored such as, paleoanthropology, archaeology, writing, architecture, and empire building. Starting with the Mesopotamians and the Egyptians, the course ends with the study of how the world's largest living religions (Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam) rose to prominence.

115.04, 20564 TR 3:05-4:20  Schadler

115.05, 20565 MWF 9-9:50  McSweeney

115.06, 21613 TR 8-9:15  Schadler

115.07, 21266 TR 10:20-11:35  Crosby

Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of  society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines. 

115.08, 20567 MWF 12-12:50  Lary

History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in world history, from prehistory to roughly 1450 C.E.  The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise.  Some of the key philosophies and religions we will examine are: Judaism, Hinduism, Pre-Socratic Philosophies, Christianity, Platonism, Buddhism and Islam.   

115.09, 20568 MWF 11-11:50  Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

115.10, 20570 MWF 1-1:50  Lary

History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in world history, from prehistory to roughly 1450 C.E.  The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise.  Some of the key philosophies and religions we will examine are: Judaism, Hinduism, Pre-Socratic Philosophies, Christianity, Platonism, Buddhism and Islam.   

115.11, 21945 W 6-8:45 (NORTH CAMPUS)  Davis

Pre-Modern History. The theme of the course is the definition of civilization. The time period of the course is prehistory to 1500. The primary regions of concern are Europe, Africa, the Middle East, India, and China. Types of historical topics considered include political, intellectual, economic, social, and artistic topics. Additionally, an ongoing concern of the course is how history relates to contemporary questions and issues.

115.12, 20571 MW 2-3:15  Phillips

Serpents, Demons, and Divas in Western Civilization. This course analyzes the relationship between religion and gender from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to the early modern European period.  We will see how both religious conceptions of the universe and gendered conceptions of the human person shaped one another and structured a variety of societies across time.  How did religion shape the idea of manhood and womanhood?  Are religious myths primarily responsible for the oppression of women and sexual minorities or are other factors more crucial?  Students will examine primary sources ranging from court cases involving adultery in classical Greece to documents related to the witch trials of early modern Europe to answer these questions. 

115.13, 21044 MWF 1-1:50  Van Meer

A World of Inventions. This course explores the history of our world, from the first hunter-gatherer societies until the dawn of modernity in the 16th century, using the comparative method. The theme of this global history course is invention and technology. By contextualizing key inventions of the past, e.g. prehistoric stone tools, Mesoamerican and Asian agriculture, early Egyptian and Chinese tombs, Byzantine and Islamic fashion, Medieval European and Japanese swords, and Chinese and European ocean-faring ships, we will examine how technological developments were interconnected with environmental, political, cultural, social, and economic practices.

115.14, 21700 TR 10:50-12:05  Piccione

115.15, 20574 TR 9:25-10:40  Mikati

115.16, 20575 TR 1:40-2:55  Mikati

115.17, 20576 M 5:30-8:15  Shumway

Africa in Premodern World History. This course will examine human history from earliest times to the fifteenth century from the perspective of the African continent and its people.  Important topics will include migration, Ancient Egypt and the spread of Islam.

115.18, 20577 T 4-6:46  Shumway

Africa in Premodern World History. This course will examine human history from earliest times to the fifteenth century from the perspective of the African continent and its people.  Important topics will include migration, Ancient Egypt and the spread of Islam.

115.19, 20578 TR 10:50-12:05 Cavalli

Sex and the Body in the Premodern West. This course is an introduction to the history of gender and sexuality from the ancient to the early modern period in Europe.  It explores political, religious, intellectual, social, cultural, and medical influences on the organization and regulation of ideas about the sexed body. It considers topics such as witchcraft, marriage and courtship, holy virginity and mysticism, widowhood, and prostitution, as well as the way gender organized institutions and communities. It asks the questions: what is the relationship between gender, sexuality, and understandings of the body? How have claims about gender and sexuality fueled religious, political, social, and scientific debate? What are the roles of religion, the state, and the family in shaping ideas about femininity and masculinity?

115.20, 23760 MW 3:25-4:40  Halvorson

Religion - OMGs! How did humankind move from hunter-gatherers in Africa to creating some of the most advanced civilizations and religions in history? This course teaches the student about the beginnings of the world's most renowned civilizations through the lens of their otherworldly beliefs. Other topics are also explored such as, paleoanthropology, archaeology, writing, architecture, and empire building. Starting with the Mesopotamians and the Egyptians, the course ends with the study of how the world's largest living religions (Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity, and Islam) rose to prominence.

115.21, 21439 MW 2-3:15  Lehman

Premodern Travel and Intercultural Contact. In this course students will explore a selection of influential travel narratives from the 10th to the 16th centuries, including Leif Eriksson’s journey to North America, diverse descriptions of the crusades, as well as Ibn Battuta, Marco Polo, and Zheng He. Travel narratives directly influence our perception of ethno-cultural groups, states, and places outside of our own. Yet, these texts are as problematic to use as any other. Grappling with our documents, the class will consider the authors’ biases and examine both the culture of origin and destination. Students will also engage the changing modes of transportation, cultural acceptance, and religious diversity our travelers encounter. 

115.23, 20581 TR 1:40-2:55  Schadler

115.24, 20583 TR 3:05-4:20  Cavalli

Saints, Heretics, and Reformers: Religious Experience in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. This course will survey the development of Christian ideas and religious practice from the medieval to the early modern periods in Europe. It asks, what historical conditions and ideas guided religious practice and contributed to the way individuals experienced spirituality? What characteristics and institutions define a good Christian community or society? and What is the relationship between the sacred and the secular? Topics include mystic and visionary experiences, tension between worldly and spiritual authority, monastic life, religious outsiders and heresy, Protestant and Catholic reform movements, witchcraft, and confessional wars of religion. 

115.25, 20589 TR 12:15-1:30  Schadler

115.26, 20572 MWF 12-12:50 Van Meer

A World of Inventions. This course explores the history of our world, from the first hunter-gatherer societies until the dawn of modernity in the 16th century, using the comparative method. The theme of this global history course is invention and technology. By contextualizing key inventions of the past, e.g. prehistoric stone tools, Mesoamerican and Asian agriculture, early Egyptian and Chinese tombs, Byzantine and Islamic fashion, Medieval European and Japanese swords, and Chinese and European ocean-faring ships, we will examine how technological developments were interconnected with environmental, political, cultural, social, and economic practices.

115.27, 21263 MWF 11-11:50  McSweeney

115.28, 21751 TR 8-9:15  Cavalli

Sex and the Body in the Premodern West. This course is an introduction to the history of gender and sexuality from the ancient to the early modern period in Europe.  It explores political, religious, intellectual, social, cultural, and medical influences on the organization and regulation of ideas about the sexed body. It considers topics such as witchcraft, marriage and courtship, holy virginity and mysticism, widowhood, and prostitution, as well as the way gender organized institutions and communities. It asks the questions: what is the relationship between gender, sexuality, and understandings of the body? How have claims about gender and sexuality fueled religious, political, social, and scientific debate? What are the roles of religion, the state, and the family in shaping ideas about femininity and masculinity?

115.29, 21752 TR 9:25-10:40  Piccione

115.31, 21438 MWF 10-10:50  Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly?  What does each one tell us about you?  This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.32, 22470 MW 3:25-4:40  Phillips

Serpents, Demons, and Divas in Western Civilization. This course analyzes the relationship between religion and gender from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to the early modern European period.  We will see how both religious conceptions of the universe and gendered conceptions of the human person shaped one another and structured a variety of societies across time.  How did religion shape the idea of manhood and womanhood?  Are religious myths primarily responsible for the oppression of women and sexual minorities or are other factors more crucial?  Students will examine primary sources ranging from court cases involving adultery in classical Greece to documents related to the witch trials of early modern Europe to answer these questions. 

115.33, 23369 MW 2-3:15  Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

116.01, 22217 MWF 9-9:50  Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history.  The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia. 

116.02, 20595 MWF 11-11:50  Donaldson

Sing for Freedom. Music has been a ubiquitous feature in protest movements of the 19th through 20th centuries. Through song, protestors have been able to express their grievances and sustain their morale in their struggles for social, cultural, political, and economic change. Music, therefore, is an important historical text that provides access to understanding the circumstances that gave rise to protest movements and insight into the motivations of activist historical actors. In this course we will examine the history of protest movements in the United States and around the world through the songs that activists created, adapted, and shared among each other and across national borders. 

116.03, 20596 MWF 12-12:50  Donaldson

Sing for Freedom. Music has been a ubiquitous feature in protest movements of the 19th through 20th centuries. Through song, protestors have been able to express their grievances and sustain their morale in their struggles for social, cultural, political, and economic change. Music, therefore, is an important historical text that provides access to understanding the circumstances that gave rise to protest movements and insight into the motivations of activist historical actors. In this course we will examine the history of protest movements in the United States and around the world through the songs that activists created, adapted, and shared among each other and across national borders. 

116.04, 20597 MWF 11-11:50  Carmichael

Drugs and History. This section of HIST 116 Modern History investigates major historical issues, events and developments, from European exploration of the New World(s) in the late 1400s to the Cold War in the mid- to late-20th century. These disparate events and others will be linked through the theoretical proposition that the modern world is an economic, political, and social network that has become increasingly connected over the last 500 years. Employing this framework, we will focus on the theme of psychoactive substances (tobacco, coffee, tea, sugar, opium, marijuana, alcohol, etc.), and their impacts on economies, politics and societies around the globe. Your success in this course will depend upon your regular reading, critical thinking, analysis of source materials, and effective writing.

116.05, 20598 MWF 12-12:50  McSweeney

116.06, 20599 MWF 1-1:50  Slater

Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of women, gender, and sexuality in relation to the rise of Western Civilization.  Studying the various roles of women and their relationships to men provide a unique lens through which to understand the rise of Europe and the Western world.  The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage women’s role in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexuality.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint) and discussion.  You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

116.07, 20600 MWF 8-8:50  Van Meer

Inventing Modern Europe. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out for world dominance. We then follow Europe’s contested history for several centuries; ending with the creation and enlargement of the European Union in the aftermath of the Cold War and in the midst of today’s global economy (ca. 2000). The theme for this course is invention and technology. By focusing on the interplay between technological structures and cultural aspirations, we will examine how and why key historical events took place, what the consequences were, and for whom, both inside and outside of Europe. Some examples of the technologies we will study are: the slave ship of the Atlantic economy, the railroads of the Industrial Revolution, the concentration camp in Hitler’s Germany and Stalin’s Russia, and the Channel tunnel connecting Britain and France in the European Union.

116.08, 20601 MWF 9-9:50 Van Meer

Inventing Modern Europe. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out for world dominance. We then follow Europe’s contested history for several centuries; ending with the creation and enlargement of the European Union in the aftermath of the Cold War and in the midst of today’s global economy (ca. 2000). The theme for this course is invention and technology. By focusing on the interplay between technological structures and cultural aspirations, we will examine how and why key historical events took place, what the consequences were, and for whom, both inside and outside of Europe. Some examples of the technologies we will study are: the slave ship of the Atlantic economy, the railroads of the Industrial Revolution, the concentration camp in Hitler’s Germany and Stalin’s Russia, and the Channel tunnel connecting Britain and France in the European Union.

116.09, 20602 MWF 9-9:50  Lehman

The History of Sports and World Domination. Using the history of sports, this class explores contests for world domination between 1700 and the present. During the 18th century, sports like horse racing and boxing were both militaristic and a class symbol. Different states across the world used sporting games to train their soldiers, for jest, and frequently in trials of honor. Over the 19th century, the tone of those sports changed as the team sports we know today developed, often serving as vehicles for national as well as individual pride in a colonial world. Some scholars argue that, particularly in a post-colonial era, those sports served as ersatz battle fields, used to demonstrate supposed national dominance even as they perpetuated gendered discrimination. The Olympics, for example, developed as a national competition, pitting state representatives in a supposedly peaceful competition laden with political implications. Looking at these components, this class explores the history sports like sumo in Japan and soccer in England. Examining at the connection between sports and perceived world domination, the class asks about why some sports spread, while others become symbols of specific national or cultural groups. Within that political framework, the course explores the relationship between sports and cultural imperialism, gender discrimination, and peace.

116.10, 20605 MWF 10-10:50  Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?  

116.11, 20606 MWF 10-10:50  Smith

Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.12, 22515 MWF 10-10:50  Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history.  The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.13, 20608 MWF 12-12:50  Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly?  What does each one tell us about you?  This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World since 1500.

116.14, 22516 MWF 12-12:50  Lehman

The History of Sports and World Domination. Using the history of sports, this class explores contests for world domination between 1700 and the present. During the 18th century, sports like horse racing and boxing were both militaristic and a class symbol. Different states across the world used sporting games to train their soldiers, for jest, and frequently in trials of honor. Over the 19th century, the tone of those sports changed as the team sports we know today developed, often serving as vehicles for national as well as individual pride in a colonial world. Some scholars argue that, particularly in a post-colonial era, those sports served as ersatz battle fields, used to demonstrate supposed national dominance even as they perpetuated gendered discrimination. The Olympics, for example, developed as a national competition, pitting state representatives in a supposedly peaceful competition laden with political implications. Looking at these components, this class explores the history sports like sumo in Japan and soccer in England. Examining at the connection between sports and perceived world domination, the class asks about why some sports spread, while others become symbols of specific national or cultural groups. Within that political framework, the course explores the relationship between sports and cultural imperialism, gender discrimination, and peace.

116.15, 20609 MWF 1-1:50  Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly?  What does each one tell us about you?  This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World since 1500.

116.16, 20610 MWF 1-1:50  Smith

Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.17, 20611 TR 12:15-1:30  Steere-Williams

The Networked Society: Media, Technology and the Public Sphere in Modern History. This course is an introduction to modern history through the lens of studying media, communication, and technology. Today mediated messages are everywhere. We live tweet political revolutions from our phones. We watch Game of Thrones on our tablets. We listen to Spotify playlists. As “digital natives,” you need no introduction to our technologically networked world. Despite its proliferation, mediation is not new, but rather at the heart of modernity. In this class we will explore the complex and uneven project of the public sphere, from the Enlightenment to the late twentieth century. We will examine disparate communicative technologies- handbills, telegraphs, the periodical press, photographs, the radio, and television, to see the ways in which they supported and at times critiqued political and economic models of citizenship and governance. Communicative technologies, we will see, have long had the ability to bring people together and to pull them apart. This class provides critical insight necessary for navigating a connected, networked world.

116.18, 20612 TR 9:25-10:40  Domby

Civil War, Insurgency, and Terrorism in Modern History. This course explores modern history through an examination of armed conflict. This class will focus on the changing nature of warfare in the modern era through the lens of civil wars and insurgencies. The class will examine the differences between civil wars, wars of independence, and international conflicts to determine what makes a war a civil war. Conflicts studied will likely include The American Revolution, The American Civil War, the Philippine insurrection, the Chinese Civil War, Vietnam, Afghanistan and the War on Terror, and the Syrian Civil War.

116.19, 20613 TR 10:50-12:05  Domby

Civil War, Insurgency, and Terrorism in Modern History. This course explores modern history through an examination of armed conflict. This class will focus on the changing nature of warfare in the modern era through the lens of civil wars and insurgencies. The class will examine the differences between civil wars, wars of independence, and international conflicts to determine what makes a war a civil war. Conflicts studied will likely include The American Revolution, The American Civil War, the Philippine insurrection, the Chinese Civil War, Vietnam, Afghanistan and the War on Terror, and the Syrian Civil War.

116.20, 23761 MWF 11-11:50  Halvorson

The Early Modern Atlantic World: Age of Discovery, Conquering, and Colonization. Reaching from Europe to Africa and the Americas, how did it come to be that in the 15th Century the Atlantic world started to become one? This course focuses on the beginnings of trans-Atlantic exploration and the effects that Europeans had on the newly discovered lands.

116.24, 21694 TR 8:55-10:10  Crosby

Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved.   The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, war fare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.25, 21508 TR 8-9:15  Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.26, 20616 TR 10:50-12:05  Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.27, 20618 MWF 11-11:50  Smith

Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.28, 20619 MWF 11-11:50  Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?  

116.31, 20620 MWF 9-9:50  Smith

Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.32, 20621 TR 10:50-12:05  Covert

History and Memory. This course explores modern history through the lens of history and memory. We will analyze how individuals, institutions, and governments have sought to remember or tried to forget historical events, people, and artifacts in modern world history ranging from Columbus’s arrival in the Caribbean to the present. In addition to learning about such historical topics as imperialism, authoritarianism, slavery, and war, then, students will also grapple with the political and economic implications of history and how it is commemorated, represented, or erased. This course will introduce students to broad historical currents in modern history and enable them to think more critically about history as a process, rather than as a static list of names and dates.

116.33, 20622 MWF 12-12:50  Halvorson

The Early Modern Atlantic World: Age of Discovery, Conquering, and Colonization. Reaching from Europe to Africa and the Americas, how did it come to be that in the 15th Century the Atlantic world started to become one? This course focuses on the beginnings of trans-Atlantic exploration and the effects that Europeans had on the newly discovered lands.

116.37, 21437 TR 12:15-1:30  Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.40, 21513 TR 1:40-2:55  Boucher

Western Representations of Native Americans since the Renaissance. This course will survey the history of Western societies from the Renaissance to the present and focus on the following question:  How have changing cultural values in the Western world shaped local perceptions of Native Americans over time.  As this class will show, Western depictions of Native Americans have often revealed more about the societies that produced them than about the indigenous peoples they intended to describe.  Whether it was during the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, or the late nineteenth century, the Western discourse on American Indians has been deeply colored by the values, anxieties, and fantasies that characterized each period.   Therefore, such representations cannot be understood without reference to the historical context that informed them.

116.41, 20623 M 6-8:45 (NORTH CAMPUS)  Davis

Modern History. The theme of the course is the advance of liberty. The time period of the course is 1750 to 1850 and beyond. The regions of concern are Europe, the United States, Canada, and Latin America. Types of historical topics considered include political, intellectual, economic, social, and artistic topics. Additionally, an ongoing concern of the course is how history relates to contemporary questions and issues.

210.01, 22495 MWF 11-11:50  Slater

Special Topics: History of American Women. This course provides a thorough exploration of women’s role in British North America in the colonial period, as well as American women from Independence to the present.  Topics include historiography to better understand how historians approach this topic, but the majority focus on how women engaged in daily life, culture, political systems, and forms of protest.  Covering roughly 1600-present, this overarching survey also includes the roles of women from African American, Native American, and other racial minorities as well as those who identify with elements of the queer community.  Students are expected to read critically several articles, primary materials, 3 monographs, and a textbook and participate actively in conversation.  This course combines both lecture and discussion and assessment is based on written exams, source analysis, participation, and exams.

218.01, 23363 TR 9:25-10:40  Boucher

The American West. This course surveys the history of a region located in North America between the 100th meridian and the Pacific coast. Since the American West holds a privileged place in the national consciousness, this class will strive to deconstruct some of the enduring myths about the region's history and cultural outlook.  As students will see, for instance, the West has not just been the stage for Anglo-American expansionism since the nineteenth century.  Instead, the region has witnessed multiple "conquests" starting with Native Americans some 14,000 years ago.  Each wave of migrants has left an indelible imprint on the local history, turning the area in a mosaic of ethnic communities locked in a contest over scarce natural resources.  As we survey the various forces that have shaped the West, students will come to develop an understanding of History as a discipline by being exposed to the latest theories in one of the most prolific fields of research in American history today.

241.01 23364 TR 9:25-10:40  Bodek
Special Topics: Totalitarianism: Nazi Germany & Stalinist Russia. The Stalinist and Nazi Regimes mark the nadir of Twentieth Century European Politics, Culture, and Society.  This course will examine their respective rises to power, leaderships, systems of governance, culture, everyday life, institutions of terror, aggression, and treatment of minorities.  These structures will help us to explore their similarities and differences. During the course of the semester, we will ask questions such as the following.  How useful is the concept of "Totalitarianism"? What is totalitarian culture? What is the nature of radical dictatorial societies?

241.03, 23381 TR 12:15-1:30  Crawford

Special Topics: Making Ireland British, 1500-1760. Late medieval Ireland was a predominantly Gaelic society with a veneer of English government and institutions.  Henry VIII imposed English direct rule after the Geraldine Rebellion; it took another century to implement the Protestant Reformation.  The Tyrone Rebellion nearly toppled the reign of Elizabeth in Ireland, despite her successful Anglicization of Irish governing institutions; the subsequent Plantation of Ulster led to centuries of conflict between Protestants and Catholics. After the failure of Irish Rebellion in the 1640s, and the ruthless depopulation of midland counties by Oliver Cromwell, a triumphant Protestant Ascendancy dominated 18th century Ireland.

250.01, 21482 MWF 10-10:50  Lehman

Special Topics: Refugee Crises and Radical Responses. World news sources today are filled with information about ongoing refugee crises and different global responses. This courses examines the 20th and 21st century history behind the contemporary global situation. Starting with the Russian Revolution, the class will consider a selection of the armed conflicts that result in refugee crises as well as varied radical responses from the erection of walls to the development of humanitarian institutions. Exploring the development of the “refugee problem” across the world, the course will use case studies from India and Pakistan as well as displacement Rwanda and Cambodia. We will examine how the concept of the refugee developed as a political category and analyze the rise of an international legal systems (under the League of Nation as well as the United Nations) to handle mass population movement. Asking about the impact of identity markers (citizenship, gender, religion, ethnicity, etc.) on experience, the class will explore the concept of state responsibility as well as the changing conception of human rights.

251.01, 23606 MWF 1-1:50  Gigova

The Modern City. An exploration of the history of the modern city in different historical contexts. The course discovers how cities came to define the modern lifestyle as hubs of business and communications, trendsetters in culture, style, and leisure, symbols of new architecture, and outdoor museums of history and memory.

270.01, 21305 TR 10:50-12:05  Mikati

Special Topics: Women and Gender in the Muslim Middle East. This course is an examination of the rights, roles and portrayals of women in the Muslim Middle East. It will consist of a historical survey from the rise of Islam to the contemporary period giving special emphasis to women’s role in the foundational Islamic texts and their interpretations. Beginning with the seventh century, we will study representations of gender in the Qur’an and Hadith. We will then consider how these are articulated in medieval and modern legal systems. Attention will be paid to the effects of colonialism and nationalist movements on Muslim women, and the rise of women activist movements. The class format will combine lecture and discussion of primary and secondary sources including articles, books and films.

270.02, 21431 TR 1:40-2:55  Piccione

ST: Ancient Egypt: Environment and History. Course focuses on effects of environment on Egyptian history, 7000-34 BC, including: landscape archaeology/geoarchaeology, Nile flood/irrigation, agriculture, land tenure, distributive economy and taxation, the river for communication/transportation, conceptions of cosmos and religion, calendars, reckoning time, time/space. Course also probes extent to which flood levels affected history in any period. Texts include: political/historical inscriptions, religious texts, flood records, tax/rental accounts, land leases, bills of sale, wills, exemption decrees, graffiti, private letters, autobiographical inscriptions, and Greek and Roman tracts on Egyptian geography, history and economy (Hecataeus, Herodotus, Diodorus, Strabo, Plutarch, etc.).

310.01, 22152 TR 1:40-2:55  Domby

Special Topics: Problems in American Historical Memory. This class examines how American remember the past and the public debates that continue to arise regarding America's history. Instead of just studying the events we will focus on how the past has been remembered by society. Questions and topics covered will likely include: What did the Founding Fathers mean? How did do we end up with monuments to the Confederacy if they lost the Civil War? Why is the Confederate flag so controversial and is it racist? Why does popular culture usually portray Native Americans in a negative light? The class will consider memorials, holidays, the pledge of allegiance, and the National Anthem among other forms of commemoration.

350.02, 22507 TR 10:50-12:05  Bodek 

Special Topics: World War One: The Great War. WWI was the greatest calamity in modern history. Casualties exceeded 60,000,000.  It brought about the industrialization of warfare. Four major empires crashed in its wake.  It aided the rise of Fascism and Communism and sped the rise of the U.S. as a global power. This course will investigate military, diplomatic, political, and social history on the western front, in the east, in the Balkans, on the high seas, and on the home front. It will look at strategy, diplomacy, and the lives of common soldiers, workers, and others as it ushered out the nineteenth century and ushered in the horrors of the twentieth. 

370.01, 22487 MWF 10-10:50  Jestice

Special Topics: The Crusades. This class will introduce students to that great meeting of Christian and Islamic civilizations in the Middle Ages known as the Crusades.  Often dismissed as a simple “mistake” in the history of Christianity or as a horrific catalyst for modern radical Islam’s condemnation of the West, crusading was in fact a complex phenomenon that changed enormously over the course of the Middle Ages.  The Crusades provide a lens through which we can examine not just warfare but attitudes toward religion, social order, monarchy, and many other elements of both western and near eastern civilization.  With probably well over a million crusaders in the period covered by this course (roughly 1095–1396), this is clearly a subject for serious investigation. 

370.02, 23372 MW 2-3:15  Alwine

Special Topics: Democracy in the Golden Age of Greece. In the two centuries now known as the Classical Age (fifth and fourth centuries B.C.), the Greek city-states scattered across the Mediterranean experienced a cultural and economic efflorescence that has few parallels in world history. A key part of this remarkable story is the birth and flourishing of democratic forms of government (at least fifty four city-states had functioning democracies during this period). This course explores the largest and best documented democracy, Athens, and then will branch out to democratic movements in other cities and in Greek federal states.

410.01, 22156 TR 9:25-10:40  Clark

Special Topics: Chesapeake Region During Colonial Era. As the capstone of the undergraduate major in History, this course is designed to enhance investigative, analytic and compositional skills. Requirements include a substantial research paper of approximately 25-30 pages, a formal report to the class based upon it, critiques of two classmates work, and participation in class discussion of assigned documents and writings. The Student may choose a topic from a list circulated on the first day or he/she may develop another in consult with the instructor. The paper is to be based upon primary sources as well as secondary works and must include an annotated bibliography and essential footnotes.

450.01, 21611 TR 1:40-2:55  Covert

Special Topics: Transnational Histories of the Americas. This capstone seminar will prepare and guide history majors as they complete a research paper. In the course we will take an inclusive approach to the theme "Transnational Histories of the Americas," with an emphasis on the specific challenges and benefits of doing transnational and/or comparative studies.