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Fall 2014 Course Offerings

Fall 2014 Course Descriptions

HIST 103-01          World History to 1500

HIST 115-01          Not yet open

HIST 115-02          Not yet open

HIST 115-03          Open TBA

HIST 115-04          Serpents, Demons, and Divas in Western Civilization.  This course analyzes the relationship between religion and gender from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to the early modern European period.  We will see how both religious conceptions of the universe and gendered conceptions of the human person shaped one another and structured a variety of societies across time.  How did religion shape the idea of manhood and womanhood?  Are religious myths primarily responsible for the oppression of women and sexual minorities or are other factors more crucial?  Students will examine primary sources ranging from court cases involving adultery in classical Greece to documents related to the witch trials of early modern Europe to answer these questions.  (Phillips)

HIST 115-05          Reason and Revelation in Western Civilization to 1500.   An introduction to the foundations of western civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization.  Unifying theme: as western humankind has sought to understand and interpret life and the universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces.  Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization.  While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.  (Vincent )

HIST 115-06          Women, Children, and the Patriarchy.  Women, children, and patriarchy will be the threads that tie together our examination of the human experience over a millennium and substantial historical developments.  Most early civilizations were essentially patriarchal, and as they became more prosperous, the status of women declined.  More often than not, religion bolstered patriarchal notions.  Even in matrilineal societies, women were still considered inferior.  Why did women put up with this situation?  In what ways were they able to carve out some space for themselves?  What power did they collectively possess?  These are some of the questions we will be examining.  (Drago)

HIST 115-07 Not yet open

HIST 115-08          Not yet open

HIST 115-09          Reason and Revelation in Western Civilization to 1500.   An introduction to the foundations of western civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization.  Unifying theme: as western humankind has sought to understand and interpret life and the universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces.  Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization.  While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.  (Vincent)

HIST 115-10          “Get it? Got it!”: Words, Images, and Gestures in the Western World to 1700.  This core course concentrates on the relationship of history to semiotics, the study of the meaning of images (words and pictures) and sounds.  The role they play in people’s lives significantly defines who “we” are.  Students will gain an appreciation of the changing values in political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the western world to 1700.  (Crout)

HIST 115-11 Serpents, Demons, and Divas in Western Civilization.  This course analyzes the relationship between religion and gender from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to the early modern European period.  We will see how both religious conceptions of the universe and gendered conceptions of the human person shaped one another and structured a variety of societies across time.  How did religion shape the idea of manhood and womanhood?  Are religious myths primarily responsible for the oppression of women and sexual minorities or are other factors more crucial?  Students will examine primary sources ranging from court cases involving adultery in classical Greece to documents related to the witch trials of early modern Europe to answer these questions.  (Phillips)

HIST 115-12 Not yet open

HIST 115-13          “Get it? Got it!”: Words, Images, and Gestures in the Western World to 1700.  This core course concentrates on the relationship of history to semiotics, the study of the meaning of images (words and pictures) and sounds.  The role they play in people’s lives significantly defines who “we” are.  Students will gain an appreciation of the changing values in political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the western world to 1700.  (Crout)

HIST 115-14          Serpents, Demons, and Divas in Western Civilization.  This course analyzes the relationship between religion and gender from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to the early modern European period.  We will see how both religious conceptions of the universe and gendered conceptions of the human person shaped one another and structured a variety of societies across time.  How did religion shape the idea of manhood and womanhood?  Are religious myths primarily responsible for the oppression of women and sexual minorities or are other factors more crucial?  Students will examine primary sources ranging from court cases involving adultery in classical Greece to documents related to the witch trials of early modern Europe to answer these questions.  (Phillips)

HIST 115-15          Reason and Revelation in Western Civilization to 1500.   An introduction to the foundations of western civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization.  Unifying theme: as western humankind has sought to understand and interpret life and the universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces.  Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization.  While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.  (Vincent)

HIST 115-16          Not yet open

HIST 115-17          Not yet open

HIST 115-18          Civilizations: Conflict or Concord.  This course is a historical survey of the major civilizations and cultures from Mesopotamia and Egypt up to the Age of Discovery (early sixteenth century CE).  The course centers on the theme of inter-cultural contacts through history and relationships among different civilizations, e.g., East-West relations over time, including: Egypt & Mesopotamia, Greece & Asia, Rome & Africa/Asia, Europe & the Middle East, etc.  It engages such issues as how did the West perceive the non-West—and act on those notions.  When different civilizations came into contact, was conflict and the desire to dominate always the result?  If not, when and why?  Commensurately, how did the non-West perceive the West?  Discussions could include European invasions of the Middle East, Jews living in Europe, and the extent of Arabic knowledge and erudition in Europe during the Middle Ages.  A major focus will be the great crusades from both the European and Saracen perspectives to demonstrate how different cultures understood the same historical processes differently.  The subject of religion and religious differences is also a factor in the readings, since religion reveals much about culture, civilization, and the transfer of ideas.  (Piccione)

HIST 115-19          Civilizations: Conflict or Concord.  This course is a historical survey of the major civilizations and cultures from Mesopotamia and Egypt up to the Age of Discovery (early sixteenth century CE).  The course centers on the theme of inter-cultural contacts through history and relationships among different civilizations, e.g., East-West relations over time, including: Egypt & Mesopotamia, Greece & Asia, Rome & Africa/Asia, Europe & the Middle East, etc.  It engages such issues as how did the West perceive the non-West—and act on those notions.  When different civilizations came into contact, was conflict and the desire to dominate always the result?  If not, when and why?  Commensurately, how did the non-West perceive the West?  Discussions could include European invasions of the Middle East, Jews living in Europe, and the extent of Arabic knowledge and erudition in Europe during the Middle Ages.  A major focus will be the great crusades from both the European and Saracen perspectives to demonstrate how different cultures understood the same historical processes differently.  The subject of religion and religious differences is also a factor in the readings, since religion reveals much about culture, civilization, and the transfer of ideas.  (Piccione)

HIST 115-20          (Boucher)

HIST 115-21          (Boucher)

HIST 115-22          Not yet open

HIST 115-23          Not yet open

HIST 115-24          (Poole)

HIST 115-25          (Delay)

HIST 115-26          Not yet open

HIST 115-27          Not yet open

HIST 115-28 (North Campus) The Role of Religion in Ancient and Medieval Civilizations.     (Davis)

HIST 115-29          (Delay)

HIST 115-30          The Role of Religion in Ancient and Medieval Civilizations.  (Davis)

HIST 115-31  (North Campus)  Early World History and the Development of the Monarchial System of Government.  History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of western and world civilization from antiquity to around the late 1600s. We will examine many topics that directly shaped western and world history, including art, global exploration, and the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, and impact of religion upon western society, scientific discoveries, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the evolution of monarchy—from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, pharaohs, caesars, emperors, and kings.  Upon completion of this course, students should be able to identify leading individuals, understand key events, as well as interpret the significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments associated with this period.         (Crosby)

HIST 115-51          The Role of Religion in Ancient and Medieval Civilizations.  (Davis)

HIST 116-01          Ideologies.  A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. We will analyze both the content of the most important modern ideologies and the specific intellectuals and political actors responsible for them. In addition, we will study the intended and unintended consequences that arose when modern ideologies were put into practice. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Each modern ideology has searched for an ultimate solution using one of these three ideals or by creating a synthesis of the three. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as nationalism, liberalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study the impact of 19th century ideologies on key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as “third worldism,” liberation theology, and political Islam. In terms of geography, the countries we will study in most detail are the following: Algeria, Chile, former Belgian Congo, France, Germany, India, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Russia, and former Yugoslavia. (Lary)

HIST 116-02          “Get it? Got it!”: Words, Images, and Gestures in the Western World since 1600.  This core course concentrates on the relationship of history to semiotics, the study of the meaning of images (words and pictures) and sounds.  The role they play in people’s lives significantly defines who “we” are.  Students will gain an appreciation of the changing values in political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the western world since 1600.  (Crout)

HIST 116-03          “Get it? Got it!”: Words, Iamges, and Gestures in the Western World since 1600.  This core course concentrates on the relationship of history to semiotics, the study of the meaning of images (words and pictures) and sounds.  The role they play in people’s lives significantly defines who “we” are.  Students will gain an appreciation of the changing values in political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the western world since 1600.  (Crout) 

HIST 116-04          Inventing Modern Europe.  This course investigates the history of “modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.”  We start in the seventeenth century at a time Europeans dominated much of the world.  We then follow Europe’s contested history for several centuries, ending with the creation and enlargement of the European Union in the aftermath of the Cold War and in the midst of today’s global economy (c. 2000).  The theme for this course is invention and technology.  By focusing on the interplay between technological structures and society’s aspirations, we will examine how and why key historical events took place, what the consequences were, and for whom, both inside and outside of Europe.  Some examples of the technologies we will study are: the slave ship of the Atlantic economy, prison and death camps in Hitler’s Nazi Germany, and the Channel tunnel connecting Britain and France in the European Union.  (Van Meer) 

HIST 116-05          Inventing Modern Europe.  This course investigates the history of “modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.”  We start in the seventeenth century at a time Europeans dominated much of the world.  We then follow Europe’s contested history for several centuries, ending with the creation and enlargement of the European Union in the aftermath of the Cold War and in the midst of today’s global economy (c. 2000).  The theme for this course is invention and technology.  By focusing on the interplay between technological structures and society’s aspirations, we will examine how and why key historical events took place, what the consequences were, and for whom, both inside and outside of Europe.  Some examples of the technologies we will study are: the slave ship of the Atlantic economy, prison and death camps in Hitler’s Nazi Germany, and the Channel tunnel connecting Britain and France in the European Union.  (Van Meer)

HIST 116-06          Ideologies.  A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. We will analyze both the content of the most important modern ideologies and the specific intellectuals and political actors responsible for them. In addition, we will study the intended and unintended consequences that arose when modern ideologies were put into practice. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Each modern ideology has searched for an ultimate solution using one of these three ideals or by creating a synthesis of the three. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as nationalism, liberalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study the impact of 19th century ideologies on key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as “third worldism,” liberation theology, and political Islam. In terms of geography, the countries we will study in most detail are the following: Algeria, Chile, former Belgian Congo, France, Germany, India, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Russia, and former Yugoslavia. (Lary)

HIST 116-07          Modern History.  This course will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history from 1715 to the Cold War era.The focus is on key developments in light of specific political doctrines and belief systems known as the 'isms'. Examples of isms that played key roles in shaping the modern era include absolutism, conservatism, liberalism, imperialism, soicialism, totalitarianism, and ati-Semitism.   (Toland)

HIST 116-08          Modern History.  This course will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history from 1715 to the Cold War era.The focus is on key developments in light of specific political doctrines and belief systems known as the 'isms'. Examples of isms that played key roles in shaping the modern era include absolutism, conservatism, liberalism, imperialism, soicialism, totalitarianism, and ati-Semitism.   (Toland)

HIST 116-09          Inventing Modern Europe.  This course investigates the history of “modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.”  We start in the seventeenth century at a time Europeans dominated much of the world.  We then follow Europe’s contested history for several centuries, ending with the creation and enlargement of the European Union in the aftermath of the Cold War and in the midst of today’s global economy (c. 2000).  The theme for this course is invention and technology.  By focusing on the interplay between technological structures and society’s aspirations, we will examine how and why key historical events took place, what the consequences were, and for whom, both inside and outside of Europe.  Some examples of the technologies we will study are: the slave ship of the Atlantic economy, prison and death camps in Hitler’s Nazi Germany, and the Channel tunnel connecting Britain and France in the European Union.  (Van Meer)

HIST 116-10          Not yet open

HIST 116-12          Violence in Modern History.  Despite a wide variety of political, social, and cultural mechanisms for dispute resolution, why have humans consistently resorted to various forms (e.g., physical, legal) of violence to solve their differences, whether between individuals or polities?  Why do we continue to do so today?  Perspectives may be derived through studying various historical events and sources around the world over the last 500 years.  Factors to be considered include politics, economics, religion, culture, geography, biology, psychology, food, drugs, and sex.  (Carmichael)

HIST 116-13          Not yet open

HIST 116-14          (Gigova)

HIST 116-15          World History Through Food.  A survey of selected major developments in modern history since 1500, using food as the focus.  The class will cover European exploration in early modern times, the Columbian connection post 1500 as it relates to food, the formation of the Atlantic World based on sugar and slavery, the links between the Industrial Revolution and New Imperialism, and finally globalization. These sections of World History will include a number of field trips to area restaurants.  Therefore, this class is not appropriate for students who have food allergies or who are not very adventurous about sampling new foods.  In addition, because of these restaurant visits, there will be some modest expenses for each meal, which students must pay at each restaurant.  (Coates)

HIST 116-17          (Gigova)

HIST 116-18          Gender and Sex in the Modern World.  Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of women and gender in relation to the rise of Western Civilization. Studying the various roles of women and their relationships to men provide a unique lens through which to understand the rise of Europe and the Western world. The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage women’s role in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexuality. You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations. This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint) and discussion. You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class. (Slater)

HIST 116-19          Not yet open

HIST 116-20          The Jigsaw Puzzle that is History.  The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad? (Livingston)

HIST 116-21          The Jigsaw Puzzle that is History.  The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad? (Livingston)

HIST 116-22          Not yet open

HIST 116-23          Not yet open

HIST 116-24          The Jigsaw Puzzle that is History.  The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad? (Livingston)

HIST 116-25          The Devil in the Western World: The History of Radical Evil in Europe & the U.S.  This class surveys the history of the modern western world by examining how religion, culture, politics and society have imagined and re-imagined the concept of the Devil. Beliefs about the Devil did not die with the coming of the Enlightenment and, in some parts of the western world, actually grew stronger. Major historical catastrophes, combined with intellectual challenges to traditional religious belief, led to a new conceptualization of the nature of evil. Some of these new articulations rejected the notion of the Devil as part of a delusional human past. Others resurrected his imagery and made it part of a larger ideological framework. 
The approach of the course will be both chronological and thematic. Along with tracing the basic history of these societies and cultures from 1715 to the present, the historical experience of evil will be explored through the study of its political, social, cultural and intellectual aspects. A heavy emphasis will be placed on the use of primary sources to construct historical arguments. The use of secondary sources will help students gain a critical understanding of the past in order to enable them to better understand contemporary issues and problems. (Poole)

HIST 116-26          Not yet open

HIST 116-27          Not yet open

HIST 116-28          Violence in Modern History.  Despite a wide variety of political, social, and cultural mechanisms for dispute resolution, why have humans consistently resorted to various forms (e.g., physical, legal) of violence to solve their differences, whether between individuals or polities?  Why do we continue to do so today?  Perspectives may be derived through studying various historical events and sources around the world over the last 500 years.  Factors to be considered include politics, economics, religion, culture, geography, biology, psychology, food, drugs, and sex.  (Carmichael)

HIST 116-29          The Jigsaw Puzzle that is History.  The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad? (Livingston) 

HIST 116-30          (North Campus)  The Advance of Liberty in Europe and the Americas, 1750–1850.             (Davis)

HIST 116-31          World History Through Food.  A survey of selected major developments in modern history since 1500, using food as the focus.  The class will cover European exploration in early modern times, the Columbian connection post 1500 as it relates to food, the formation of the Atlantic World based on sugar and slavery, the links between the Industrial Revolution and New Imperialism, and finally globalization. These sections of World History will include a number of field trips to area restaurants.  Therefore, this class is not appropriate for students who have food allergies or who are not very adventurous about sampling new foods.  In addition, because of these restaurant visits, there will be some modest expenses for each meal, which students must pay at each restaurant.  (Coates)

HIST 116-32          Not yet open

HIST 116-34          (Steere-Williams)

HIST 116-36          Ideologies.  A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. We will analyze both the content of the most important modern ideologies and the specific intellectuals and political actors responsible for them. In addition, we will study the intended and unintended consequences that arose when modern ideologies were put into practice. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Each modern ideology has searched for an ultimate solution using one of these three ideals or by creating a synthesis of the three. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as nationalism, liberalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study the impact of 19th century ideologies on key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as “third worldism,” liberation theology, and political Islam. In terms of geography, the countries we will study in most detail are the following: Algeria, Chile, former Belgian Congo, France, Germany, India, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Russia, and former Yugoslavia. (Lary)

HIST 116-37          Inventing Modern Europe.  This course investigates the history of “modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.”  We start in the seventeenth century at a time Europeans dominated much of the world.  We then follow Europe’s contested history for several centuries, ending with the creation and enlargement of the European Union in the aftermath of the Cold War and in the midst of today’s global economy (c. 2000).  The theme for this course is invention and technology.  By focusing on the interplay between technological structures and society’s aspirations, we will examine how and why key historical events took place, what the consequences were, and for whom, both inside and outside of Europe.  Some examples of the technologies we will study are: the slave ship of the Atlantic economy, prison and death camps in Hitler’s Nazi Germany, and the Channel tunnel connecting Britain and France in the European Union.  (Van Meer)

HIST 116-38          (Steere-Williams)

HIST 116-39  (North Campus) Modern Europe and the Monarchy.  History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of modern European history from the seventeenth century to the present.  The course will focus on key developments in Europe during this time frame, as well as chronicle Europe’s most enduring system of government, the monarchy.  The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figureheads of this period.  This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution—how it has been able to survive in some countries today in one form or another despite revolutions, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.  (Crosby)

HIST 201                United States to 1865        (Murphy)

HIST 211                American Urban History    (Hopkins)

HIST 215                Native American History    (Boucher)

HIST 216                African-American History to 1865   (Murphy)

HIST 225                History of the South since 1865.  This course is an introduction to the study of the modern American South.  Although we will study different events, people, and places from various angles throughout the semester, we will ground our survey of the South with the theme of southern distinctiveness.  What is the South, exactly?  How have the region’s defining characteristics changed over time?  Nothing, of course, is distinct in isolation, so we will also situate the South within the context of American history.      (Ingram)

HIST 230                Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia: A Survey of the Ancient Near East.  This course is a historical survey of the major civilizations of ancient western Asia and north Africa, including Sumer, Egypt, Akkad, Babylonia, Assyria, the Hittites, Phoenicia, Syria, and Canaan from the origins of agriculture (c. 8500 BCE) to the conquests of Alexander the Great (c. 330 BCE).  The class explores the historical development of the different civilizations and their cultural and political interrelationships, as revealed specifically in their archaeology and texts.      (Piccione)

HIST 231                Ancient Greece    (Alwine)

HIST 241                ST: Cities & Urban Cultures               (Gigova)

HIST 250                ST: History of Global Terrorism         (Lary)

HIST 270                ST: The 100 Years War.  This course explores 116 years of hostility between England and France (1337–1453).  Or was it a French civil war?  Whichever the case, the 100 Years War shaped western Europe and ushered it into the early modern era in decisive ways.  This course will examine the nature of late medieval warfare, of course, but we will also explore the nature of late medieval society as a whole through the lens of this interminable war, paying particular attention to social change and state formation.               (Jestice)

HIST 276                Islamic Civilization               (Mikati)

HIST 299-01          Historian’s Craft   (TBA)

HIST 299-02          Historian’s Craft   (Olejniczak)

HIST 299-03          Historian’s Craft   (Steere-Williams)

HIST 304                Civil War & Reconstruction                (Drago)

HIST 320                ST: Victorian Charleston     (Stockton)

HIST 347                ST: Birth & Bodies: Reproduction in History.  In this course, students examine pregnancy, childbirth, reproduction, and motherhood in different historical contexts.  The focus is on modern Europe (since 1500), with attention also paid to European empires and colonies.  Specific topics covered include the medicalization of childbirth; experiences of pregnancy; midwifery and nursing; and contraception, abortion, and infanticide.        (Delay)

HIST 350-01          ST: The Portuguese Empire.  This course will examine the global Portuguese presence from 1400 until the revolution in 1974 and the end of the Portuguese Empire.  Some of the major themes of the course will be: navigation, colonization, interaction with colonized peoples, administration, resistance, and independence.  The course will examine all regions of the former empire in the Atlantic, Brazil, Africa, and Asia.  (Coates)

HIST 350-02          ST: Modern Jewish Politics                (Slucki)

HIST 361-01          ST: Ethiopia Through the Ages.  Home to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, Abyssinia/Ethiopia has long been significant in the Abrahamic religious traditions, and through trade and politics it has interacted closely with other non-western civilizations.  This course offers an overview of thousands of years of history in the Horn of Africa, focusing on Ethiopia and emphasizing non-western viewpoints in studying the past.  It will appeal to students interested in archaeology, anthropology, religion, linguistics, commerce, agriculture, statecraft, ethnicity, Marxism, regionalism, federalism, nationalism, democracy, language, race, war, international relations, terrorism, and other issues.    (Carmichael)

HIST 361-02          Latin American Cities in Historical Perspective.  This course examines the history of Latin American cities from the pre-Columbian period to the present day.             (Covert)

HIST 410                Research Seminar in U.S. History: Identities on the Margins: Race, Religion, Genders, and Sexualities in American History.  (Slater)

HIST 450                Research Seminar in Comparative/Transnational History: Holy War.      (Jestice)