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Summer 2019 Course Offerings

Course Descriptions

115.01, 30004 MTWRF 8:30-12:00, Piccione - MAYMESTER

World History in Hollywood Films. This course surveys some of the great civilizations in World History from 3,000 BC to 1300 AD. It also focuses on deconstructing mythologies, false perceptions and  popular misconceptions about the histories of these civilizations by examining popular Hollywood films and foreign cinematic spectacles. Students will study and discuss specific historical issues as they are properly understood, view the films and analyze discrepancies between fact and fiction by asking pertinent historical questions and applying proper historical methodology. Hence, students will understand how history is often distorted for a variety of reasons, including dramatic license for entertainment purposes, as well as society’s need to legitimize political policies or to sanitize and/or mythologize its past.

115.02, 30109 MTWRF 10:00-11:45, Delay - SUMMER I

Love, Sex, and Marriage. This general education course examines the history of love, sex, and marriage from the first civilizations to approximately 1600 in Europe and the Mediterranean. Students will study how and why ideas about love and sex informed the political, economic, social, intellectual, and cultural developments of historical civilizations. We will explore issues such as the connections between religion and sexuality, the changing meanings of “love,” gender and the formation of state systems, marriage and the family, “deviant” or alternative sexualities, and the relationship between gender, sexuality, and the law. Throughout the semester, we will read a variety of works, with a particular focus on primary-source documents. We will also hone our skills in critical reading, writing, and analysis. 

115.03, 30301 ONLINE, Mikati - SUMMER I

Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents a historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 800 C.E.

115.04, 30341 ONLINE, Mikati - SUMMER I

Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents a historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 800 C.E.

115.05, 30852 ONLINE, Cavalli - SUMMER II

Sex and the Body in Premodern Europe. This course is an introduction to the history of gender and sexuality from the ancient to the early modern period in Europe. It explores political, religious, intellectual, social, cultural, and medical influences on the organization and regulation of ideas about the sexed body. It considers topics such as witchcraft, marriage and courtship, holy virginity and mysticism, widowhood, prostitution, and the way ideas about gender and sexuality organized institutions and communities. It asks the questions: what is the relationship between gender, sexuality, and understandings of the body? How have claims about gender and sexuality fueled religious, political, social, and scientific debate? What are the roles of religion, the state, and the family in shaping ideas about femininity and masculinity?

116.01, 30005 MTWRF 8:30-12:00, Boucher - MAYMESTER

Western Representations of Native Americans. This course will survey the history of Western societies from the Renaissance to the present and focus on the following question:  How have changing cultural values in the Western world shaped local perceptions of Native Americans over time?  As this class will show, Western depictions of Native Americans have often revealed more about the societies that produced them than about the indigenous peoples they intended to describe.  Whether it was during the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, or the late nineteenth century, the Western discourse on American Indians has been deeply colored by the values, anxieties, and fantasies that characterized each period.   Therefore, such representations cannot be understood without reference to the historical context that informed them.

116.02, 30006 MTWRF 12:00-1:45, Slater - SUMMER I

Gender, Race and Sexualities in the Modern West. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of women, gender, race, and sexualities in relation to the rise of Western Civilization. The focus will be on gendered liberties. Studying the various roles of women and their relationships to men provide a unique lens through which to understand the rise of Europe and the Western world.  The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage women’s role in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexualities.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint) and discussion.  You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

116.03, 30461 ONLINE, Steere-Williams - SUMMER II

Epidemics and Revolutions: Disease in Modern Society. The recent global epidemic crisis of Ebola provides a backdrop for the fascinating historical questions we will ask in this course, of how the social experience and cultural understanding of disease have shaped modern global history. We will explore how both chronic and infectious diseases have played a fundamental role in the development of modern modes of governance, public health, modern technologies, and a global economy. We will also examine how disease illuminates social attitudes about class, race, and colonialism in the period from the Enlightenment to the present. Using diverse examples such as cholera outbreaks in Europe, bubonic plague in India, syphilis in Africa, yellow fever in North America and the Caribbean, and HIV/AIDS across the globe, this course demonstrates that the historical analysis of disease is integral to understanding both ‘modernity’ and ‘globalization’. 

116.04, 30863 ONLINE, Steere-Williams - SUMMER II

Epidemics and Revolutions: Disease in Modern Society. The recent global epidemic crisis of Ebola provides a backdrop for the fascinating historical questions we will ask in this course, of how the social experience and cultural understanding of disease have shaped modern global history. We will explore how both chronic and infectious diseases have played a fundamental role in the development of modern modes of governance, public health, modern technologies, and a global economy. We will also examine how disease illuminates social attitudes about class, race, and colonialism in the period from the Enlightenment to the present. Using diverse examples such as cholera outbreaks in Europe, bubonic plague in India, syphilis in Africa, yellow fever in North America and the Caribbean, and HIV/AIDS across the globe, this course demonstrates that the historical analysis of disease is integral to understanding both ‘modernity’ and ‘globalization’. 

116.06, 30295 MTWRF 10:00-11:45, Slater - SUMMER II

Gender, Race and Sexualities in the Modern West. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of women, gender, race, and sexualities in relation to the rise of Western Civilization. The focus will be on gendered liberties. Studying the various roles of women and their relationships to men provide a unique lens through which to understand the rise of Europe and the Western world.  The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage women’s role in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexualities.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint) and discussion.  You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

210.04, 30107 MTWRF 8:30-12:00, Poole - MAYMESTER

Special Topics: Terror in the Aisles: The Horror Film and 20th Century America. What frightened audiences about Frankenstein in 1931 when most don't find it the least bit frightening now? Did Jaws help American's forget Vietnam? What does 9/11 have to do with zombie film? Would Get Out have been so popular without the Black Lives Matter movement? This class examines 20th c. American history and horror films by thinking about how such movies intersect with a variety of America traditions, folklore and ideas about monsters. Students are to think critically about these films as primary historical sources and what they reveal about key events, cultural ideologies and moral panics in the American historical experience.

226.01, 30703 MTWRF 10:00-11:45, Poole - SUMMER I

American Monsters. Why do we need monster stories to understand American history? How does knowing what causes terror, or wonder, help explain crucial cultural, political and cultural moments in American life? The class explores American history from the colonial period to the present. We will examine how narratives of monstrosity and horror have intersected with important historical events, cultural ideologies and moral panics in the American historical experience. We will look at specific historical periods to examine how horror narratives intertwine with significant events and ideas in folk belief, legend, political discourse, gender constructions, religion and pop culture.

241.02, 30754 STUDY ABROAD, Olejniczak - Summer II

Europe and Great Britain in the 20th Century. This special study abroad program places students in the historic heart of London for a full month. Our focus will be on the changing map of Europe and what Brexit means for the EU, GB, and Scotland. Excursions include historic museums and sites of WWI and WWII in the UK, a three day visit to Edinburgh, Scotland, discussions with on-site experts on the pressing issues of immigration, globalization, environmental policy, sustainability, and the future of the UK.

270.01, 30324 MTWRF 8:30-12:00, Jestice - MAYMESTER

Special Topics: The 100 Years War. In 1337 the English and French kings declared war on each other.  It was nothing new; conflict between the two had been more the rule than the exception ever since a French duke (William the Conqueror) had become king of England in 1066.  The stakes were raised in 1337, though, for a number of reasons—the military machine of the late Middle Ages had grown to alarming proportions, concepts of what it meant to be a king were shifting, and Edward III of England claimed to be the lawful monarch of France.  The result was a hundred years of war (well, actually 116).  With long pauses for plague, rulers going insane, and economic exhaustion, the conflict kept restarting itself.  The result was a rapid transformation of European warfare and, many historians argue, the creation of England and France as distinct nations.