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Summer 2017 Course Offerings

Maymester

115.01, 30005 MTWRF 8:30-12:00  Piccione

World History in Hollywood Films. This course surveys some of the great civilizations in World History from 3,000 BC to 1300 AD. It also focuses on deconstructing mythologies, false perceptions and popular misconceptions about the histories of those civilizations by examining popular Hollywood films and foreign cinematic spectacles. Students will study and discuss specific historical issues as they are properly understood, view the films and analyze discrepancies between fact and fiction by asking pertinent historical questions and applying proper historical methodology. Hence, students will understand how history is often distorted for a variety of reasons, including dramatic license for entertainment purposes, as well as society’s need to sanitize and/or mythologize its past.

116.01, 30006 MTWRF 8:30-12:00 Covert

Pirates, Rebels, and Other New World Deviants. This course will look at those who deviated from societal norms and values as a way of understanding broader historical currents in modern history. Specifically, we will study a number of unconventional religious, economic, and political actors in order to examine histories of empire, gender, and political economy in the New World from Columbus's arrival to the Age of Revolutions. Students will also develop critical thinking skills through analytical engagement with primary source materials.

116.04, 30708 MTWRF 8:30-12:00 Steere-Williams

Epidemics and Revolutions. The recent global epidemic crisis of Ebola provides a backdrop for the fascinating historical questions we will ask in this course, of how the social experience and cultural understanding of disease have shaped modern global history. We will explore how both chronic and infectious diseases have played a fundamental role in the development of modern modes of governance, public health, modern technologies, and a global economy. We will also examine how disease illuminates social attitudes about class, race, and colonialism in the period from the Enlightenment to the present. Using diverse examples such as cholera outbreaks in Europe, bubonic plague in India, syphilis in Africa, yellow fever in North America and the Caribbean, and HIV/AIDS across the globe, this course demonstrates that the historical analysis of disease is integral to understanding both “modernity” and “globalization”.

210.02, 30126 MTWRF 8:30-12:00 Boucher

Warfare in Native America. This course will provide a short introduction to the history of warfare in Native America to the Battle of Little Big Horn. While we will examine manifestations of this phenomenon in Mesoamerica, the class will pay particular attention to the region located north of the Rio Grande.  Students will consider the following questions: What were the goals, modalities, and consequences of warfare in indigenous North America?  How did Native American martial practices impact military encounters with Europeans and how did they evolve afterwards?  How did indigenous tactics on the battlefield affect the way colonial powers waged war?

210.04, 30157 MTWRF 8:30-12:00 Poole

Horror Films & 20th Century America. The class examines American history and horror films by thinking about how such movies intersect with a variety of traditions, folklore, political events, warfare, and social movements in the twentieth century. The goal of the course is to think critically about these films as primary historical sources and what they reveal about key events, cultural ideologies and moral panics in the American historical experience.

250.01, 30709 MTWRF8:30-12:00 Gigova

The Cold War. An overview of the lengthy, multifaceted and impactful Cold War conflict that divided the world after 1945 into supporters and opponents of the Soviet Union and the United States and their political and economic systems.

261.01, 30405 MTWRF 8:30-12:00 Carmichael

Cannabis in History & Culture. With a primary focus on cannabis, this course employs the tropes of drugs and popular culture(s) to study historical continuity and change.  Our investigations will address fields and concepts that include: geography, generation, nationality, race, religion, culture, military service, class, gender, pharmacology, and law, among others.  These fields and concepts reflect the social values and forces that exist in a given place and time and are thus used by historians to interpret past events and their relationships to the present. Our main concern will be to identify and analyze the various forces that – at any specific point in the past – influenced use of or attitudes about cannabis, and how such forces have persisted or changed over time.  As such, this is a traditional history course that concentrates on empirical evidence and different methodologies to interpret primary source evidence, developing well-informed arguments in the process.  Owing to the content and methodologies, this course may also be viewed as useful preparation for those of you who are interested in future careers in the law, policing, education, military, medicine, pharmaceuticals, counseling, harm reduction, public health, or politics among other fields.

 

Summer I

115.02, 30159 MTWRF 10-11:45  Slater

Women and Gender in Western Civilization. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of women and gender in relation to the rise of Western Civilization in the pre-modern world.  Studying the various roles of women and their relationships to men provide a unique lens through which to understand the rise of Europe and the Western world.  The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage women’s role in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of sexuality.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint) and discussion.  You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

115.03, 30815 MTWRF ONLINE Schadler

Christian, Muslim, and Jewish Relations from the Origins of Islam to 1492. This course will survey Christian, Muslim, and Jewish relations in the Pre-Modern period.  In particular, we will focus on points of peace and conflict in Late Antiquity in the eastern Mediterranean and Medieval Iberia, as well as important intellectual and cultural exchanges that took place among these three groups. 

116.02, 30007 MTWRF 12-1:45  Slater

Women and Gender. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of women, gender, and sexualities in relation to the rise of Western Civilization. The focus will be on gendered liberties. Studying the various roles of women and their relationships to men provide a unique lens through which to understand the rise of Europe and the Western world.  The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage women’s role in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexualities.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint) and discussion.  You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

116.05, 30782 MTWRF ONLINE Gigova

From Subject to Citizen: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. In particular, we will think about the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over several weeks we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? Does great awareness of this past alter your own view of what it means to be citizen today? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

250.03, 30796 MTWRF 10-11:45 Bodek

World War II. Students will examine key questions about the Second World War. For example, what were its causes? How was it fought? What were its effects on civilians, combatants, and subsequent history? You will read primary and secondary accounts to develop your own interpretations of events.

270.01, 30797 MTWRF 2-3:45 Coy

Witchcraft in Europe & America. This course will examine the great witch-hunts that swept Europe and America during the early modern period, analyzing the intersection of power, religiosity, and magical beliefs that fueled the trials. By discussing recent historical interpretations concerning witchcraft alongside primary sources pertaining to folk magic, learned conceptions of malevolent sorcery and demonology, and criminal proceedings, we will attempt to understand the witch-hunts within the context of early modern culture and society.

Summer II

115.06, 30253 MTWRF 10-11:45 Coates

Pilgrimages in World History. This course in world history will use the focus of pilgrimages and world religions to examine major events in world history before 1500. Each student will join at least one group for a presentation on one of the major pilgrimages during this period. In addition, each student will work individually on another pilgrimage and its place in world history. 

116.06, 30793 MTWRF ONLINE Steere-Williams

Epidemics and Revolutions. The recent global epidemic crisis of Ebola provides a backdrop for the fascinating historical questions we will ask in this course, of how the social experience and cultural understanding of disease have shaped modern global history. We will explore how both chronic and infectious diseases have played a fundamental role in the development of modern modes of governance, public health, modern technologies, and a global economy. We will also examine how disease illuminates social attitudes about class, race, and colonialism in the period from the Enlightenment to the present. Using diverse examples such as cholera outbreaks in Europe, bubonic plague in India, syphilis in Africa, yellow fever in North America and the Caribbean, and HIV/AIDS across the globe, this course demonstrates that the historical analysis of disease is integral to understanding both “modernity” and “globalization”.

250.02, 30711 MTWRF 10-11:45 Poole

Gothic History: Tales of Death and the Undead in the Post-Enlightenment World. The “age of reason” featured a new round of witch- hunts and a fascination with vampires in the new world. In England, a new literary style, the gothic, reawakened the ghosts of the past and raised devils in ruined castles and monasteries.   Audiences in Paris thrilled to magic lantern shows that featured devils, spirits, monsters and laughing skeletons. This class seeks to understand the roots of these fascinations and explain their enduring appeal.  We follow the course of the gothic from the 18th century all the way to contemporary horror film, TV shows, urban legends, political theatre, and popular fiction in current American history.