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Spring 2020 Course Offerings

Course Descriptions

104.01, 20965 MWF 8-8:50, Crosby

World History from 1500 CE to Present. History 104 will cover world history from 1500 CE to the present, and covers the chief political, social, economic, cultural, and religious developments in that period. The objectives of the course are to examine the interaction between different cultures with differing worldviews, globalization (the increasing interconnection between economies, societies, and their ideas), and the effects of industrialization, modernization, imperialism, decolonization, and their consequences, and the effects of the two world war.

115.01, 20426 TR 1:40-2:55, Coy

Explaining the Universe: Magic, Religion, and Society in the WestThis course examines the development of Western Civilization from the Neolithic period to the eighteenth century, with a special focus on supernatural beliefs and changing conceptions of magic, religion, and science.

115.02, 20427TR 9:25-10:40, Mikati

Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.03, 20429 TR 12:15-1:30, Mikati

Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.04, 20430 TR 10:50-12:05, Piccione

History, Legend and Mythology. This course surveys the major civilizations of the ancient world through the lens of legend and mythology. Beginning with Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, it continues through the Minoans, Greeks and Romans (up to. AD 476). It focuseson the major myths and legends of these societies, including early creation mythologies, Egyptian and Mesopotamian legends of the gods and heroes, and legendary tales from Greece and Rome. Topics include the historical foundations of many of these legends, and the extent to which later legends of the Greeks and Romans were influenced by–or adapted from–earlier myths and legends of Egypt and the East. In this manner, the course explores not only what legends and mythology reveal about these historical civilizations, but also how those societies viewed themselves.

115.05, 20431 MWF 10-10:50, Phillips

Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.06, 23258 TR 9:25-10:40, Koopman

Princes and Paupers: Pilgrimage in the Premodern World. This course will explore the practice of pilgrimage in different religious traditions, including Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. With the help of primary sources, we will travel around the world to examine how members of various faiths treated pilgrimage in the premodern era. In the process, we will investigate pilgrims' encounters with people of other faiths and cultures, including the phenomenon of the crusades and shared pilgrimage sites.

115.07, 20985 TR 10:20-11:35 NORTH CAMPUS, Crosby

Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of  society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines. 

115.08, 20433 MW 2:00-3:15, Krajewski

Crisis and Response in the Iberian World. This course begins with the Muslim conquests of the Iberian Peninsula and ends with the final reconquest by the Catholic monarchs at the end of the fifteenth century. It will focus on ecological, biological, and environmental pressures, with particular emphasis on the Little Ice Age, the Great Famine, and the Black Death.

115.09, 20434 MWF 9-9:50, Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.10, 23259 TR 10:50-12:05, Koopman

Princes and Paupers: Pilgrimage in the Premodern World. This course will explore the practice of pilgrimage in different religious traditions, including Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. With the help of primary sources, we will travel around the world to examine how members of various faiths treated pilgrimage in the premodern era. In the process, we will investigate pilgrims' encounters with people of other faiths and cultures, including the phenomenon of the crusades and shared pilgrimage sites.

115.12, 20436 MWF 9-9:50, Crosby

Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of  society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines. 

115.13, 20437 MWF 11-11:50, Phillips

Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.14, 23261 TR 3:05-4:20, Koopman

Princes and Paupers: Pilgrimage in the Premodern World. This course will explore the practice of pilgrimage in different religious traditions, including Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. With the help of primary sources, we will travel around the world to examine how members of various faiths treated pilgrimage in the premodern era. In the process, we will investigate pilgrims' encounters with people of other faiths and cultures, including the phenomenon of the crusades and shared pilgrimage sites.

115.15, 20439 TR 8-9:15, Piercy

Vikings, Muslims, and Inuits: Cultural Exchange and Alterity (800–1500). How different cultures encountered and identified others in historical texts and objects such as chronicles, journals, sagas, folk tales, and art illustrate not only their views on those different to themselves, but also help with the identification of social identities within the primary culture. This class examines examples from the North Atlantic, the Russian Steppes, the Byzantine Empire, the Caliphate, China, and others in order to access the cultural interactions of different medieval peoples. Through the examination of primary evidence and scholarly work, we will explore first contacts, developing relations, and the consequences of cultural exchange in the medieval period.

115.16, 20440 MWF 9-9:50, Smith

A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.17, 20441 MWF 10-10:50, Smith

A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.18, 20442 TR 12:15-1:30, Piercy

Vikings, Muslims, and Inuits: Cultural Exchange and Alterity (800–1500). How different cultures encountered and identified others in historical texts and objects such as chronicles, journals, sagas, folk tales, and art illustrate not only their views on those different to themselves, but also help with the identification of social identities within the primary culture. This class examines examples from the North Atlantic, the Russian Steppes, the Byzantine Empire, the Caliphate, China, and others in order to access the cultural interactions of different medieval peoples. Through the examination of primary evidence and scholarly work, we will explore first contacts, developing relations, and the consequences of cultural exchange in the medieval period.

115.19, 20443 W 6-8:45 PM, Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.20, 21692 MWF 11-11:50, Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. Unifying theme: As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

115.24, 20447 TR 9:25-10:40, Halvorson

Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.25, 20453 TR 10:50-12:05, Halvorson

Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.26, 20817 TR 1:40-2:55, Halvorson

Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.27, 20983 TR 3:05-4:20, Halvorson

Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.29, 21281 TR 1:40-2:55, Piercy

Vikings, Muslims, and Inuits: Cultural Exchange and Alterity (800–1500). How different cultures encountered and identified others in historical texts and objects such as chronicles, journals, sagas, folk tales, and art illustrate not only their views on those different to themselves, but also help with the identification of social identities within the primary culture. This class examines examples from the North Atlantic, the Russian Steppes, the Byzantine Empire, the Caliphate, China, and others in order to access the cultural interactions of different medieval peoples. Through the examination of primary evidence and scholarly work, we will explore first contacts, developing relations, and the consequences of cultural exchange in the medieval period.

115.33, 21574 MWF 12-12:50, Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. Unifying theme: As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

116.01, 21430 MWF 11-11:50, Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.   

116.02, 20458 TR 9:25-10:40, Boucher

Western Representations of Native Americans. This course will survey the history of Western societies from the Renaissance to the present and focus on the following question: How have changing cultural values in the Western world shaped local perceptions of Native Americans over time? As this class will show, Western depictions of Native Americans have often revealed more about the societies that produced them than about the indigenous peoples they intended to describe. Whether it was during the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, or the late nineteenth century, the Western discourse on American Indians has been deeply colored by the values, anxieties, and fantasies that characterized each period. Therefore, such representations cannot be understood without reference to the historical context that informed them.

116.03, 20459 TR 10:50-12:05, Boucher

Western Representations of Native Americans. This course will survey the history of Western societies from the Renaissance to the present and focus on the following question: How have changing cultural values in the Western world shaped local perceptions of Native Americans over time? As this class will show, Western depictions of Native Americans have often revealed more about the societies that produced them than about the indigenous peoples they intended to describe. Whether it was during the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, or the late nineteenth century, the Western discourse on American Indians has been deeply colored by the values, anxieties, and fantasies that characterized each period. Therefore, such representations cannot be understood without reference to the historical context that informed them.

116.05, 20461 MW 2-3:15, Donaldson

Sing for Freedom. Music has been a ubiquitous feature in protest movements of the 19th through 20th centuries. Through song, protestors have been able to express their grievances and sustain their morale in their struggles for social, cultural, political, and economic change. Music, therefore, is an important historical text that provides access to understanding the circumstances that gave rise to protest movements and insight into the motivations of activist historical actors. In this course we will examine the history of protest movements in the United States and around the world through the songs that activists created, adapted, and shared among each other and across national borders. 

116.06, 20462 MWF 12-12:50, Eaves

Slavery in the Americas. In this course, we will focus on one of the most important aspects of world history—slavery in the Atlantic World from its beginnings in the late 1400 to its abolition in the 1800s. With a broad regional scope, we will look at slavery and the slave trade on both sides of the Atlantic—in Africa, North and South America, and the Caribbean. Through the course, we will gain a better understanding of the significant role slavery, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and abolitionist movements played in shaping the Atlantic world socially, culturally, politically, and economically. We will pay particular attention to themes such as slave taking, resistance, agency, labor, gender, and enslaved community and family, and the slave economy. As we live in Charleston, one of the most significant ports through which thousands of Africans forcibly entered the would-be United States, we will pay particular attention to slavery in the southern region of the US, but will gain an appreciation for how slavery looked throughout the Caribbean and Brazil.

116.07, 20463 MWF 1-1:50, Eaves

Slavery in the Americas. In this course, we will focus on one of the most important aspects of world history—slavery in the Atlantic World from its beginnings in the late 1400 to its abolition in the 1800s. With a broad regional scope, we will look at slavery and the slave trade on both sides of the Atlantic—in Africa, North and South America, and the Caribbean. Through the course, we will gain a better understanding of the significant role slavery, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and abolitionist movements played in shaping the Atlantic world socially, culturally, politically, and economically. We will pay particular attention to themes such as slave taking, resistance, agency, labor, gender, and enslaved community and family, and the slave economy. As we live in Charleston, one of the most significant ports through which thousands of Africans forcibly entered the would-be United States, we will pay particular attention to slavery in the southern region of the US, but will gain an appreciation for how slavery looked throughout the Caribbean and Brazil.

116.08, 20464 MWF 9-9:50, Gigova

FROM SUBJECT TO CITIZEN: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. Through primary sources, lectures and discussions, we will explore the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over the course of the semester we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

116.09, 20465 MWF 10-10:50, Gigova

FROM SUBJECT TO CITIZEN: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. Through primary sources, lectures and discussions, we will explore the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over the course of the semester we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

116.12, 21519 MWF 12-12:50, Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.14, 21520 MWF 11-11:50, Van Meer

Inventing Modern Europe. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of the European Union. The theme for this course is the interplay between technological structures, economic motivations, and societal aspirations.

116.16, 20473 MWF 1-1:50, Slater

Women, Gender, and Race in Modern History. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of women, gender, race, and sexualities in relation to the rise of Western Civilization. The focus will be on gendered liberties. Studying the various roles of women and their relationships to men provide a unique lens through which to understand the rise of Europe and the Western world.  The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage women’s role in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexualities.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint) and discussion.  You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

116.17, 20474 TR 12:15-1:30, Steere-Williams

Epidemics and Revolutions. The recent global epidemic crisis of Ebola provides a backdrop for the fascinating historical questions we will ask in this course, of how the social experience and cultural understanding of disease have shaped modern global history. We will explore how both chronic and infectious diseases have played a fundamental role in the development of modern modes of governance, public health, modern technologies, and a global economy. We will also examine how disease illuminates social attitudes about class, race, and colonialism in the period from the Enlightenment to the present. Using diverse examples such as cholera outbreaks in Europe, bubonic plague in India, syphilis in Africa, yellow fever in North America and the Caribbean, and HIV/AIDS across the globe, this course demonstrates that the historical analysis of disease is integral to understanding both “modernity” and “globalization”.

116.18, 20475 MWF 9-9:50, Cropper

The History of the Atlantic World, Climate Change, and the Anthropocene. This course focuses on the history of the Atlantic World, Climate Change, and the Anthropocene from the fifteenth century to the present, and will consider how broad historical processes of transformation and change, from the Age of Exploration and the Industrial Revolution to the Great Acceleration and Climate Change, have catalyzed a new epoch in human and natural history: the Anthropocene. In doing so, we will consider how various populations of the Atlantic World have contributed to anthropogenic climate change, and how exponential economic growth and intensive energy use have triggered unprecedented processes of environmental change. Indeed, one of the primary objectives of this course is to reflect on what it means to be living in this new epoch of natural history and how we—as humans—have arrived at this point. By considering the challenging realities of the Anthropocene, from climate change to environmental degradation and mass extinction, students will consider Earth as a global ecosystem that is shaped by a variety of dynamic and interactive systems—both natural and anthropogenic.

116.19, 20476 MWF 10-10:50, Cropper

The History of the Atlantic World, Climate Change, and the Anthropocene. This course focuses on the history of the Atlantic World, Climate Change, and the Anthropocene from the fifteenth century to the present, and will consider how broad historical processes of transformation and change, from the Age of Exploration and the Industrial Revolution to the Great Acceleration and Climate Change, have catalyzed a new epoch in human and natural history: the Anthropocene. In doing so, we will consider how various populations of the Atlantic World have contributed to anthropogenic climate change, and how exponential economic growth and intensive energy use have triggered unprecedented processes of environmental change. Indeed, one of the primary objectives of this course is to reflect on what it means to be living in this new epoch of natural history and how we—as humans—have arrived at this point. By considering the challenging realities of the Anthropocene, from climate change to environmental degradation and mass extinction, students will consider Earth as a global ecosystem that is shaped by a variety of dynamic and interactive systems—both natural and anthropogenic.

116.20, 21693 TR 8-9:15, Veeder

Genocide in Modern History. In this course we will analyze the nature and causes of genocide, mass atrocities, and human rights issues in modern history. Together we will examine theoretical approaches to the study of genocide, state sponsored violence, and ethnically and gender-based violence, with special attention paid to the issues of race and gender. We will analyze primary source documents, memoirs, testimonies, and artistic works, and put these sources into the context of colonization processes, regimes, dictatorships, and international and civil conflicts.

116.22, 22119 TR 9:25-10:40, Veeder

Genocide in Modern History. In this course we will analyze the nature and causes of genocide, mass atrocities, and human rights issues in modern history. Together we will examine theoretical approaches to the study of genocide, state sponsored violence, and ethnically and gender-based violence, with special attention paid to the issues of race and gender. We will analyze primary source documents, memoirs, testimonies, and artistic works, and put these sources into the context of colonization processes, regimes, dictatorships, and international and civil conflicts.

116.23, 23448 ONLINE, Ingram

Race and Imperialism in AmericaIn this course we will explore efforts to both support and challenge ideas about empire by studying global conflicts, cultural revolutions, and major social movements in the U.S. and abroad between the 1890s and the present. By re-thinking topics such as western imperialism alongside Jim Crow segregation in the U.S.; international Cold War Diplomacy alongside the American Civil Rights Movement; and American proxy wars within the context of decolonization, we will re-evaluate major events in American History during Long Twentieth Century within a global context. While this class focuses on a ~125-year period, we will explore a much broader period for most of the topics we study in order to better understand the historical contexts in which they occurred.

116.24, 21244 M 6-8:45 PM, NORTH CAMPUS, Davis

Modern History. The theme of the course is the advance of liberty. The time period of the course is 1750 to 1850 and beyond. The regions of concern are Europe, the United States, Canada, and Latin America. Types of historical topics considered include political, intellectual, economic, social, and artistic topics. Additionally, an ongoing concern of the course is how history relates to contemporary questions and issues.

116.25, 21144 MWF 1-1:50, Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?

116.26, 20479 MWF 11-11:50, Gordanier

East Asian History Through Performing Arts: From Kunqu to K-Pop and Beyond. The performing arts in premodern East Asia were more than just entertainment: music, dance, story, and acting were tools for education, social networking, diplomacy, and religious ritual, but they were also (according to authorities), dangerous vehicles for corruption, sedition, and debauchery. What makes performance so powerful even today? This course uses theater, dance, music, and other performance forms as a window on East Asian history and society from premodern times to the present day, with a particular focus on China, Korea, and Japan in the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. We will investigate the ways performing arts conveyed, transgressed, or even shaped ideas about how people ought to think and live; the audiences these performances reached; and the people who brought them to life.

116.27, 20481 MWF 11-11:50, Crout

MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD SINCE 1600: THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION. What do the material objects that are important to you tell others about who you are?  This course concentrates on the role objects (material culture) have played in defining who “we” are through studying the artifacts we leave behind such as architecture, household goods, art, foods, clothing, and style.  Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World since 1600.

116.28, 20482 MWF 11-11:50, Krajewski

Revolutions in Modern World History. The course begins with a unit on the revolutions of the late 18th and early 19th centuries (USA, France, Haiti, and Latin American Independence); the second unit will focus on the revolutions to upend established political economic orders in the first half of the 20th (Mexico, Russia, and China); and, finally, we trace the maturation of both class-based political movements and anti-imperialism in the 20th century (Vietnam's several revolutionary attempts, Algeria, Cuba, Nicaragua, and Iran). One of the goals of the class will be to ask students to think about how movements, motivations, goals, and regimes compare between revolutions in the anti-colonial context and those that occur inside of established, independent nations.

116.30, 22197 TR 1:40-2:55, Veeder

Genocide in Modern History. In this course we will analyze the nature and causes of genocide, mass atrocities, and human rights issues in modern history. Together we will examine theoretical approaches to the study of genocide, state sponsored violence, and ethnically and gender-based violence, with special attention paid to the issues of race and gender. We will analyze primary source documents, memoirs, testimonies, and artistic works, and put these sources into the context of colonization processes, regimes, dictatorships, and international and civil conflicts.

116.31, 20483 MWF 1-1:50, Krajewski

Revolutions in Modern World History. The course begins with a unit on the revolutions of the late 18th and early 19th centuries (USA, France, Haiti, and Latin American Independence); the second unit will focus on the revolutions to upend established political economic orders in the first half of the 20th (Mexico, Russia, and China); and, finally, we trace the maturation of both class-based political movements and anti-imperialism in the 20th century (Vietnam's several revolutionary attempts, Algeria, Cuba, Nicaragua, and Iran). One of the goals of the class will be to ask students to think about how movements, motivations, goals, and regimes compare between revolutions in the anti-colonial context and those that occur inside of established, independent nations.

116.32, 20484 MWF 8-8:50, Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.33, 20485 MWF 9-9:50, Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.37, 21095 MW 2-3:15, Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?

116.40, 21148 MWF 9-9:50, Van Meer

Modern Europe, the Quest for the Arctic. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the historical thread uniting all our topics is “the North Pole”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.41, 20486 TR 8:55-10:10 NORTH CAMPUS, Crosby

Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved.   The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.42, 21147 MWF 8-8:50, Van Meer

Modern Europe, the Quest for the Arctic. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the historical thread uniting all our topics is “the North Pole”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.43, 21575 MWF 12-12:50, Van Meer

Inventing Modern Europe. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of the European Union. The theme for this course is the interplay between technological structures, economic motivations, and societal aspirations.

202.01, 23263 MWF 12-12:50, Smith

United States History since 1865. The purpose of this course is to incorporate peoples’ actions into the context of modern American history, beginning with the final shots of the Civil War and concluding in the present time.  By weaving together the social, political, economic, and environmental aspects of the American experience, this course will seek to explain how and why particular people of various backgrounds crucially shaped a nation.  In doing so, we will see how United States citizens and immigrants transformed the land and each other while developing an overall American identity. Ultimately, we will focus on the theme of freedom and answer the following question: what has freedom meant to Americans since the end of the Civil War, and how have those meanings changed over time? With a driving narrative of noteworthy and ordinary people, events, and institutions, this course will (hopefully) provide you with a concise, yet diverse, understanding of this nation’s evolution.

210.01, 22198 MWF 10-10:50, Eaves

Special Topics: African Americans and Sexuality from Slavery and Freedom. In this course, students will examine the impact of the intersections of gender, race, and sexuality in the lives of African Americans from the period of enslavement to freedom. Major topics will include the historic exploitation of black people’s sexuality to form race and racist ideology in the United States; the history of black sexual expressions and identities and LGBTQ liberation movements; and role of sexuality in the fight for political, economic, social equality. 

217.01, 20487 MW 4-6:45, Powers

African American History since 1865. This course examines the historical experience of African Americans beginning with the period following the Civil War and continuing until the present time.  Among the topics considered are:  Reconstruction, blacks and the New South, African American leadership, the impact of the world wars, consequences of the Great Depression and New Deal, and the rise and consequences of civil rights activism.

222.01, 13371 T 5:30-8:15, Stockton

History of South Carolina. South Carolina from the colonial period to the present. Topics discussed include plantation slavery, Southern nationalism, pro-slavery ideology, the nullification crisis, the secessionist movement and the Civil War, the disintegration of slavery and the transition to a free labor economy, regional diversification and the slow process of modernization that continued throughout the 20th century. 

225.01, 23256 TR 4-5:15, Ingram

History of the South since 1865. This course is an introduction to the study of the American South. Although we will study different events, people and places from various angles throughout the semester, we will ground our survey of the South with the theme of southern “distinctiveness.” Why, after all, do we study the history of the South as a separate subdiscipline? What is the South, exactly? How have the region’s defining characteristics changed over time? Nothing, of course, is distinct in isolation, so we will also situate the South within the context of American History (and World History, too). At what points could we say that the South was more (or less) integrated into the (inter)national economy and the body politic?  Do ideas about southern “distinctiveness” change during major events like wars, economic depressions, or political realignments?

226.01, 23257 TR 9:25-10:40, Poole

American Monsters: The History of American Horror Narratives. Why do we need monster stories to understand American history? This class explores American history from the colonial period to the present. We will examine how narratives of monstrosity and horror have intersected with important historical events, cultural ideologies and moral panics in the American historical experience. After some theoretical grounding in the idea of monstrosity as a marker of cultural history, we will look at specific historical periods to examine how horror narratives intertwine with significant events and ideas in folk belief, legend, political discourse, gender constructions, religion and pop culture.

232.01, 21201 TR 8-9:15, Gerrish

Ancient Rome. The city of Rome grew from a tiny settlement on the Palatine Hill to a mighty empire stretching from Britain to Babylon.  In this course we will follow Rome's great generals, statesmen, and enemies from Rome's foundation by Romulus in 753 BCE to the death of Rome's first Christian emperor in 337 CE.  We will focus primarily on the political, military, and economic history of Rome; we will discuss its rich literary and artistic culture, as well. This course examines not just the history of Rome, but also its historiography: that is, how do we know what we think we know about Rome? Can - and should - we separate “history” from “myth”?  And how did ancient authors' conception of “truth” and “fact” differ from our own?

241.02, 21879 TR 3:05-4:20, Bodek

Special Topics: World War II. In this course students will examine questions that contribute to a better understanding of the war, what it was, how it was fought, and what it meant. Among these are the following. What were the causes of the Second World War? What was the effect of the war on civilians, combatants, and subsequent history? Why did it end as it did?  What were its consequences for Europe and, indeed, the world. Students will read primary and secondary accounts of the war in order to develop their own interpretations of events. They will also sharpen their analytical skills through writing and discussion.

241.03, 22367 TR 1:40-2:55, Koopman

Special Topics: Inquisition in the Early Modern Period. The Spanish Inquisition is perhaps remembered primarily as a symbol of intolerance and cruelty in the Catholic Church, but it is little understood today. In this course, we will examine the various inquisitions of the early modern period, and separate myth from reality.  

250.02, 22132 TR 10:50-12:05, Piercy

Special Topics: Rebellions and Revolutions: Comparative Upheaval and Violence. Throughout history, the oppressed, the aggrieved, and the downtrodden have come together to oppose those in power, often with violent results. These rebellions and revolutions, from ancient times to the modern era, have shaped social and cultural development in a wide variety of ways. This course will examine conflicts ranging from the small and local to the globally impactful, covering and comparing rebellions and revolutions from different time periods and geographic regions. Analysis of how revolts developed, how rebels mobilized, and how issues such as race, ethnicity, gender, and class were dealt with in the confines of these events will form the basis of our explorations. 

252.01, 23429 TR 12:15-1:30, Veeder

Women in Europe. This course concentrates on gender and women in modern Europe, focusing on events, themes, and sources that will allow us to investigate the dynamics of gender relations and the personal perspective and lived reality of the era. The course will cover from the French Revolution to the contemporary period, examining changing perceptions of family, work, health, rights, and political obstacles and opportunities. We will pay particular attention to women and gender issues within the wars and regimes of the twentieth century- including the World Wars, revolutions, and fascist and communist regimes. The goal of the course is for students to learn to investigate the ways that gender has influenced daily life, experience, and social and political change, especially through the analysis of primary sources.

261.01, 23262 MWF 1-1:50, Gordanier

Special Topics: Gender, Sexuality, and Society in Early Modern ChinaWhat is "gender"—what does it mean to be a "man" or a "woman?" What is "sexual orientation?" What is "a family," and what is it for?  In this class we will adjust our angle of view, investigating the social and cultural history of China from the Ming dynasty through the Qing and the end of the imperial system—a period extending roughly from the 14th-early 20th century—through the lens of gender and sexuality. We will explore what happens when scholars use gender as a "category of analysis" that can reveal new insights on subjects ranging from family and property to law, labor, crime, politics and, yes, sex and love; and we will consider how these histories, in turn, may lead to new ways of understanding the slippery categories of gender and sexual identity. 

261.02, 23430 MWF 10-10:50, Krajewski

Special Topics: Labor and Migration in Lation America. This course traces the social history of labor and migration in Latin America from the 19th century through contemporary immigration debates, analyzing how changes in the global economy affect the availability and the experience of work across the region. Using case studies from across Latin America, the course aims to understand key questions about the daily lives of diverse groups of Latin American men and women: Who works? Where do they work? What is it like working there? And, what happens when there is no work to be found?

270.03, 22118 TR 12:15-1:30, Piccione

Special Topics: Pharaohs, Pyramids and the People of Ancient Egypt. This course is an essential introduction to ancient Egyptian civilization and culture, including both a political and social history of Egypt. Using ancient Egyptian texts and material culture as a basis, it explores issues in Egyptian life and society from the First Dynasty up to Alexander the Great (c. 3100-332 BC). Topics include: origins and ethnicities, political history, pyramid building, geography, social institutions, status of women, religion and magic, daily life activities, language, writing and more. The class will also consider how the modern West interprets Egypt as a major contributor to the development of world civilization, viewing itself (the West) in many ways as an heir of Egyptian culture, while at the same time categorizing much of it as culturally alien and otherly.

273.01, 22200 MWF 12-12:50, Cropper

Modern Africa. This course explores the history of Modern Africa by examining continuity and change throughout the continent from the early nineteenth century to today. The course starts by considering how Africans responded to global processes of transformation, such as the end of the transatlantic slave trade, the emergence of “legitimate commerce,” and the European Scramble for Africa. In doing so, we will trace how African systems of trade, politics, and culture did not simply disappear with European conquest, but have continued to shape the way Africans live in the modern world. The course will then consider the history of Africa under the yoke of European colonialism. In taking a broad geographic and thematic lens, we will examine consistent themes of colonialism over time and space, focusing on the nature of colonial rule, resistance and collaboration, the environment and natural resources, and decolonization and independence. We will then turn to the history of postcolonial Africa and examine the diverse experiences of independent African nations. In particular, we will explore how Africans have both shaped and responded to local and global processes of change and transformation, from the establishment of self-rule, democratization, and apartheid and despotism to global phenomena such as neoliberalism, development and aid, and globalization.

291.01, 23265 M 5:30-8:15 PM, Steere-Williams

Disease, Medicine, and History. This course investigates the changing meanings and entanglements of medical science, public health, and medical practice from the 18th century. We will examine ideas about the body and disease, the changing role and image of medicine in American and European life. Key themes we will examine include alternative medicine, the growth of medicine’s cultural authority, medical professionalization, the rise of public health, hospital care, and imperial and colonial medicine. We will probe these issues through the lenses of class, race, gender, age, lifestyle, and place in terms of health. Though the focus of the class is on the western medicine, throughout the course we will be making transnational and global comparisons. Your overall assessment in this class depends on your class participation and writing. You will work to sharpen your verbal and argumentative skills in frequent class discussions, and your writing skills through the formal study of some practical problems of expository writing and by revising essays that you write on topics raised in our historical discussion.

299.02, 21333 MWF 1-1:50, Covert

The Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

299.03, 21256 TR 10:50-12:05, Cavalli

The Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

304.01, 23254 TR 10:50-12:05, Domby

History of the United States: Civil War and Reconstruction, 1845-1877. This course will focus on the growth of sectional antagonisms, the causes of the war, the politicians and military leadership during the war and the Reconstruction period. Students will leave this class with a basic understanding of the course of events leading up to, during, and after the Civil War. They will also be familiar with the causes, impacts, and course of the war and Reconstruction and gain experience reading and analyzing primary sources, in their writing and in discussion. 

320.01, 22094 T 5:30-8:15 PM, Stockton

Special Topics: Charleston Architechture. This course is a topical study of the architecture of Charleston and the Lowcountry of South Carolina, from the Colonial period to the early years of the twenty-first century.  The European, Caribbean and West African roots of Charleston architecture are explored. Architectural periods and styles, building types, town planning, Colonial fortifications, landscape architecture, and historic preservation are explored.

370.01, 22030 MWF 11-11:50, Jestice

Special Topics: The Crusades. This class will explore what is arguably the most important movement of European history.  Beginning in the eleventh century, western Christendom went on the offensive, recovering formerly Christian lands from Muslims and increasingly seeking to conquer the remaining polytheistic lands of northeastern Europe.  Above all, they sought to regain the Holy Land (the territory included in the modern states of Israel, Lebanon, and parts of Jordan and Syria), hallowed as the land of Jesus’ ministry.  This is a course on religious aspiration, on military methods, on transport, on the development of banking, on colonization, on intercultural encounter (or lack of the same)----and above all a course on how wave after wave of western European men and women threw themselves against the East in a desperate and ultimately doomed effort to take and hold the holy city of Jerusalem. 

410.01, 21157 TR 1:40-2:55, Boucher

American History. In this capstone seminar, students will write a research paper related to the History of the American West, a region located in North America between the 98th meridian and the Pacific coast. 

441.01, 21833 TR 9:25-10:40, Coy

Reformation EuropeThis capstone seminar will explore the dynamic cultural, social, and political changes caused by the European Reformations of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The course will focus on the impact of religious change in Protestant and Catholic Europe, analyzing how it affected aspects of early modern society as diverse as power relations, popular culture, and gender norms. By discussing pioneering recent scholarship on the European Reformations and by analyzing primary sources from the period, we will attempt to understand how life changed for the people of Europe during this time of dramatic social and religious transformation. Students will produce a capstone research paper based upon their analysis of primary and secondary sources pertaining to Reformation-era European history.