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Spring 2019 Course Offerings

Course Descriptions

104.01, 21062 MWF 8-8:50, Crosby

World History from 1500 CE to Present. History 104 will cover world history from 1500 CE to the present, and covers the chief political, social, economic, cultural, and religious developments in that period. The objectives of the course are to examine the interaction between different cultures with differing worldviews, globalization (the increasing interconnection between economies, societies, and their ideas), and the effects of industrialization, modernization, imperialism, decolonization, and their consequences, and the effects of the two world war.

115.01, 20473 MWF 8-8:50, Martin

Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will explore the history of the pre-modern world.  Rather than covering the history of the world, an impossible task, we will focus upon travel.  Our discussions will treat the accounts of travelers in Europe, Asia, and Africa, as well as the movement of disease, the importance of infrastructure such as land and sea trade routes, and technology such as maps and compasses. Our sources will include art, architecture, and texts that travelers wrote.  These will help us to understand how travelers interacted with different people and environments, while also illuminating the dynamism of the pre-modern world.

115.02, 20474 MWF 9-9:50, Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.03, 20476 MWF 9-9:50, Crosby

Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of  society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines. 

115.04, 20477 MWF 10-10:50, Halvorson

Ancient Egypt and Its Neighbors. Learn about one of the most enduring civilizations in the ancient world and the people with which they interacted from Africa, Asia, and Europe. From the Great Pyramids of Egypt to the female pharaoh Cleopatra, who was the ancestor of the Greek Macedonians, the Egyptians still fascinate people today.

115.05, 20478 MWF 12-12:50, Halvorson

Ancient Egypt and Its Neighbors. Learn about one of the most enduring civilizations in the ancient world and the people with which they interacted from Africa, Asia, and Europe. From the Great Pyramids of Egypt to the female pharaoh Cleopatra, who was the ancestor of the Greek Macedonians, the Egyptians still fascinate people today.

115.07, 21087 TR 10:20-11:35 NORTH CAMPUS, Crosby 

Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of  society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines.

115.08, 20480 MWF 11-11:50, Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. Unifying theme: As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

115.09, 20481 MWF 1-1:50, Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. Unifying theme: As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

115.12, 20484 MW 2-3:15, Halvorson

Ancient Egypt and Its Neighbors. Learn about one of the most enduring civilizations in the ancient world and the people with which they interacted from Africa, Asia, and Europe. From the Great Pyramids of Egypt to the female pharaoh Cleopatra, who was the ancestor of the Greek Macedonians, the Egyptians still fascinate people today.

115.13, 20485 MW 2-3:15, Shumway

Africa in Premodern World History. This course will examine human history from earliest times to the fifteenth century from the perspective of the African continent and its people.  Important topics will include migration, Ancient Egypt and the spread of Islam.

115.15, 20487 MWF 9-9:50, Martin

Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will explore the history of the pre-modern world.  Rather than covering the history of the world, an impossible task, we will focus upon travel.  Our discussions will treat the accounts of travelers in Europe, Asia, and Africa, as well as the movement of disease, the importance of infrastructure such as land and sea trade routes, and technology such as maps and compasses. Our sources will include art, architecture, and texts that travelers wrote.  These will help us to understand how travelers interacted with different people and environments, while also illuminating the dynamism of the pre-modern world.

115.16, 20488 MWF 10-10:50, Cavalli

Sex and the Body in the Premodern West. This course is an introduction to the history of gender and sexuality from the ancient to the early modern period in Europe. It explores political, religious, intellectual, social, cultural, and medical influences on the organization and regulation of ideas about the sexed body. It considers topics such as witchcraft, marriage and courtship, holy virginity and mysticism, widowhood, prostitution, and the way ideas about gender and sexuality organized institutions and communities. It asks the questions: what is the relationship between gender, sexuality, and understandings of the body? How have claims about gender and sexuality fueled religious, political, social, and scientific debate? What are the roles of religion, the state, and the family in shaping ideas about femininity and masculinity?

115.17, 20489 MWF 11-11:50, Cavalli

Saints, Heretics, and Reformers in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. This course will survey the development of Christian ideas and religious practice from the medieval to the early modern periods in Europe. It asks, what historical conditions and ideas guided religious practice and contributed to the way individuals experienced spirituality? What characteristics and institutions define a good Christian community or society? and What is the relationship between the sacred and the secular? Topics include mystic and visionary experiences, tension between worldly and spiritual authority, monastic life, religious outsiders and heresy, Protestant and Catholic reform movements, witchcraft, and confessional wars of religion.

115.18, 20490 MW 4-5:15, Phillips

Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.19, 20491 W 6-8:45 NORTH CAMPUS, Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.20, 21968 TR 1:40-2:55, Coy

Explaining the Universe: Magic, Religion, and Society in the West. This course examines the development of Western Civilization from the Neolithic period to the eighteenth century, with a special focus on supernatural beliefs and changing conceptions of magic, religion, and science.

115.24, 20495 TR 9:25-10:40, Mikati

Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.25, 20501 TR 12:15-1:30, Mikati

Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.26, 20889 MW 3:25-4:40, Halvorson

Ancient Egypt and Its Neighbors. Learn about one of the most enduring civilizations in the ancient world and the people with which they interacted from Africa, Asia, and Europe. From the Great Pyramids of Egypt to the female pharaoh Cleopatra, who was the ancestor of the Greek Macedonians, the Egyptians still fascinate people today.

115.27, 21084 MWF 11-11:50, Martin

Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will explore the history of the pre-modern world.  Rather than covering the history of the world, an impossible task, we will focus upon travel.  Our discussions will treat the accounts of travelers in Europe, Asia, and Africa, as well as the movement of disease, the importance of infrastructure such as land and sea trade routes, and technology such as maps and compasses. Our sources will include art, architecture, and texts that travelers wrote.  These will help us to understand how travelers interacted with different people and environments, while also illuminating the dynamism of the pre-modern world.

115.29, 21444 MWF 9-9:50, Smith

A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.31, 21220 TR 10:50-12:05, Piccione

History, Legend and Mythology. This course surveys the major civilizations of the ancient world through the lens of legend and mythology. Beginning with Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, it continues through the Minoans, Greeks and Romans (up to. AD 476). It focuseson the major myths and legends of these societies, including early creation mythologies, Egyptian and Mesopotamian legends of the gods and heroes, and legendary tales from Greece and Rome. Topics include the historical foundations of many of these legends, and the extent to which later legends of the Greeks and Romans were influenced by–or adapted from–earlier myths and legends of Egypt and the East. In this manner, the course explores not only what legends and mythology reveal about these historical civilizations, but also how those societies viewed themselves.

115.33, 21811 MWF 10-10:50, Smith

A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

116.01, 21636 MW 5:30-6:45, Schaffer

Welcome to history 116: Pirates, Wars, and Empires: 1500-2019. In this class, we will explore how empires and nations have dealt with pirates in the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa, from the Reformation to the modern day. While the largest part of the course will focus on Anglo-American piracy in the 17th and 18th-century Atlantic and Caribbean worlds, we will look at how the oldest maritime crime changed the course of world history, and continues to be a persistent nuisance for America's foreign affairs and security. While this class is technically a "sequel" to the fall semester's 115 class on premodern piracy, no prior knowledge of pirates, or familiarity with that class is necessary. While attendance is mandatory, class time will be split between a lecture and a discussion section every Monday and Wednesday. Group extra credit opportunities will allow students to interact with local pirate history, especially as Charleston celebrates the 300th anniversary of the Golden Age of Piracy.

116.02, 20507 MWF 8-8:50, Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam. Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.03, 20508 MWF 9-9:50, Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam. Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.04, 20509 TR 3:05-4:20, Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.05, 20510 MWF 12-12:50, Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?  

116.06, 20511 MWF 1-1:50, Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?  

116.07, 20512 MW 4-5:15, Schaffer

Welcome to history 116: Pirates, Wars, and Empires: 1500-2019. In this class, we will explore how empires and nations have dealt with pirates in the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Africa, from the Reformation to the modern day. While the largest part of the course will focus on Anglo-American piracy in the 17th and 18th-century Atlantic and Caribbean worlds, we will look at how the oldest maritime crime changed the course of world history, and continues to be a persistent nuisance for America's foreign affairs and security. While this class is technically a "sequel" to the fall semester's 115 class on premodern piracy, no prior knowledge of pirates, or familiarity with that class is necessary. While attendance is mandatory, class time will be split between a lecture and a discussion section every Monday and Wednesday. Group extra credit opportunities will allow students to interact with local pirate history, especially as Charleston celebrates the 300th anniversary of the Golden Age of Piracy.

116.08, 20513 MWF 10-10:50, Eaves

Slavery in the Americas. In this course, we will focus on one of the most important aspects of world history—slavery in the Atlantic World from its beginnings in the late 1400 to its abolition in the 1800s. With a broad regional scope, we will look at slavery and the slave trade on both sides of the Atlantic—in Africa, North and South America, and the Caribbean. Through the course, we will gain a better understanding of the significant role slavery, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and abolitionist movements played in shaping the Atlantic world socially, culturally, politically, and economically. We will pay particular attention to themes such as slave taking, resistance, agency, labor, gender, and enslaved community and family, and the slave economy. As we live in Charleston, one of the most significant ports through which thousands of Africans forcibly entered the would-be United States, we will pay particular attention to slavery in the southern region of the US, but will gain an appreciation for how slavery looked throughout the Caribbean and Brazil.

116.09, 20514 MWF 11-11:50, Eaves

Slavery in the Americas. In this course, we will focus on one of the most important aspects of world history—slavery in the Atlantic World from its beginnings in the late 1400 to its abolition in the 1800s. With a broad regional scope, we will look at slavery and the slave trade on both sides of the Atlantic—in Africa, North and South America, and the Caribbean. Through the course, we will gain a better understanding of the significant role slavery, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and abolitionist movements played in shaping the Atlantic world socially, culturally, politically, and economically. We will pay particular attention to themes such as slave taking, resistance, agency, labor, gender, and enslaved community and family, and the slave economy. As we live in Charleston, one of the most significant ports through which thousands of Africans forcibly entered the would-be United States, we will pay particular attention to slavery in the southern region of the US, but will gain an appreciation for how slavery looked throughout the Caribbean and Brazil.

116.10, 20517 MWF 12-12:50, Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam. Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.11, 20518 MWF 12-12:50, Slater

Modern History. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of the complicated relationships between Enlightenment ideas of liberty and equality and the struggle for their application in Europe and America. The focus will be on gendered and racial liberties. The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage a series of historical topics/moments related to gender and race in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexualities.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint), documentaries, and discussion.  You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

116.12, 21750 TR 8-9:15, Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.13, 20520 MWF 8-8:50, Van Meer

Modern Europe, the Quest for the Arctic. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the historical thread uniting all our topics is “the Arctic”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.14, 21751 TR 12:15-1:30, Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.15, 20521 MWF 10-10:50, Van Meer

Modern Europe, the Quest for the Arctic. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the historical thread uniting all our topics is “the Arctic”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.16, 20522 MWF 11-11:50, Crout

MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD SINCE 1600: THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION. What do the material objects that are important to you tell others about who you are?  This course concentrates on the role objects (material culture) have played in defining who “we” are through studying the artifacts we leave behind such as architecture, household goods, art, foods, clothing, and style.  Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World since 1600.

116.17, 20523 MWF 12:00-12:50, Chen

East Asia in the World. This course will explore the long-lasting economic, political, cultural, and ideological connections between East Asian countries and how the interactions were changed in modern times, partly because of the coming of the West and partly because of the internal development of East Asian societies. The modern history of East Asia will be divided into four overlapping chronological phrases: "Pre-modern Asian internationalism" between the 16th and 18th century; "Western Imperialism" in the 19th and early 20th century; "Japanese Imperialism" in the late 19th and the first half of the 20th century; and "American Influence" in the second half of the 20th century. Some major themes for this course include international trade, imperialism, the rise of the nation-state, the perceptions (and misperceptions) between East Asians and foreigners, migration, and wars.

116.18, 20524 MWF 1:00-1:50, Chen

East Asia in the World. This course will explore the long-lasting economic, political, cultural, and ideological connections between East Asian countries and how the interactions were changed in modern times, partly because of the coming of the West and partly because of the internal development of East Asian societies. The modern history of East Asia will be divided into four overlapping chronological phrases: "Pre-modern Asian internationalism" between the 16th and 18th century; "Western Imperialism" in the 19th and early 20th century; "Japanese Imperialism" in the late 19th and the first half of the 20th century; and "American Influence" in the second half of the 20th century. Some major themes for this course include international trade, imperialism, the rise of the nation-state, the perceptions (and misperceptions) between East Asians and foreigners, migration, and wars.

116.19, 20525 MWF 11-11:50, Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam. Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.20, 21969 MWF 12-12:50, Smith

Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.22, 23441 MWF 1-1:50, Smith

Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.24, 21400 M 6-8:45 NORTH CAMPUS, Davis

Modern History. The theme of the course is the advance of liberty. The time period of the course is 1750 to 1850 and beyond. The regions of concern are Europe, the United States, Canada, and Latin America. Types of historical topics considered include political, intellectual, economic, social, and artistic topics. Additionally, an ongoing concern of the course is how history relates to contemporary questions and issues.

116.25, 21275 TR 1:40-2:55, Domby

Civil War, Insurgency, and Terrorism in Modern History. This course explores modern history through an examination of armed conflict. This class will focus on the changing nature of warfare in the modern era through the lens of civil wars and insurgencies. The class will examine the differences between civil wars, wars of independence, and international conflicts to determine what makes a war a civil war. Conflicts studied will likely include The American Revolution, The American Civil War, the Philippine insurrection, the Chinese Civil War, Vietnam, Afghanistan and the War on Terror, and the Syrian Civil War.

116.26, 20528 TR 10:50-12:05, Donaldson

Sing for Freedom. Music has been a ubiquitous feature in protest movements of the 19th through 20th centuries. Through song, protestors have been able to express their grievances and sustain their morale in their struggles for social, cultural, political, and economic change. Music, therefore, is an important historical text that provides access to understanding the circumstances that gave rise to protest movements and insight into the motivations of activist historical actors. In this course we will examine the history of protest movements in the United States and around the world through the songs that activists created, adapted, and shared among each other and across national borders. 

116.27, 20530 TR 12:15-1:30, Donaldson

Sing for Freedom. Music has been a ubiquitous feature in protest movements of the 19th through 20th centuries. Through song, protestors have been able to express their grievances and sustain their morale in their struggles for social, cultural, political, and economic change. Music, therefore, is an important historical text that provides access to understanding the circumstances that gave rise to protest movements and insight into the motivations of activist historical actors. In this course we will examine the history of protest movements in the United States and around the world through the songs that activists created, adapted, and shared among each other and across national borders. 

116.28, 20531 MW 2-3:15, Lehman

Folktales and the National Project: Reading Modern Political History in Folktales. Beginning in the 18th century and moving through the 20th century, this class explores the modern national political project through three sets of folktales: German, Japanese, and Nigerian. Looking at how governments, scholars, and local groups fought over group identity, the class will use folktales to examine the similarities and differences between the resulting idea of being German, Japanese, and Nigerian. Reading tales like Cinderella, Momotarō, and the novel Things Fall Apart, this course will do deep readings to understand culture as a political project both to instill in a majority population and for export (cultural politics). In so doing, the course briefly touches on the idea of empire, colonization, and independence. 

116.30, 23543 MWF 1-1:50, Van Meer

Inventing Modern Europe. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of the European Union. The theme for this course is the interplay between technological structures, economic motivations, and societal aspirations.

116.31, 20532 TR 9:25-10:40, Boucher

Western Representations of Native Americans. This course will survey the history of Western societies from the Renaissance to the present and focus on the following question: How have changing cultural values in the Western world shaped local perceptions of Native Americans over time? As this class will show, Western depictions of Native Americans have often revealed more about the societies that produced them than about the indigenous peoples they intended to describe. Whether it was during the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, or the late nineteenth century, the Western discourse on American Indians has been deeply colored by the values, anxieties, and fantasies that characterized each period. Therefore, such representations cannot be understood without reference to the historical context that informed them.

116.32, 20533 TR 10:50-12:05, Boucher

Western Representations of Native Americans.This course will survey the history of Western societies from the Renaissance to the present and focus on the following question: How have changing cultural values in the Western world shaped local perceptions of Native Americans over time? As this class will show, Western depictions of Native Americans have often revealed more about the societies that produced them than about the indigenous peoples they intended to describe. Whether it was during the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, or the late nineteenth century, the Western discourse on American Indians has been deeply colored by the values, anxieties, and fantasies that characterized each period. Therefore, such representations cannot be understood without reference to the historical context that informed them.

116.33, 20534 TR 9:25-10:40, Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.37, 21219 TR 12:15-1:30, Ingram

Race and Imperialism in America: In this course we will explore efforts to both support and challenge ideas about empire by studying global conflicts, cultural revolutions, and major social movements in the U.S. and abroad between the 1890s and the present. By re-thinking topics such as western imperialism alongside Jim Crow segregation in the U.S.; international Cold War Diplomacy alongside the American Civil Rights Movement; and American proxy wars within the context of decolonization, we will re-evaluate major events in American History during Long Twentieth Century within a global context. While this class focuses on a ~125-year period, we will explore a much broader period for most of the topics we study in order to better understand the historical contexts in which they occurred.

116.40, 21279 TR 4-5:15, Krajewski

Revolutions in Modern World History. The course begins with a unit on the revolutions of the late 18th and early 19th centuries (USA, France, Haiti, and Latin American Independence); the second unit will focus on the revolutions to upend established political economic orders in the first half of the 20th (Mexico, Russia, and China); and, finally, we trace the maturation of both class-based political movements and anti-imperialism in the 20th century (Vietnam's several revolutionary attempts, Algeria, Cuba, Nicaragua, and Iran). One of the goals of the class will be to ask students to think about how movements, motivations, goals, and regimes compare between revolutions in the anti-colonial context and those that occur inside of established, independent nations.

116.41, 20535 TR 8:55-10:10 NORTH CAMPUS, Crosby

Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved.   The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.42, 21278 TR 3:05-4:20, Domby

Civil War, Insurgency, and Terrorism in Modern History. This course explores modern history through an examination of armed conflict. This class will focus on the changing nature of warfare in the modern era through the lens of civil wars and insurgencies. The class will examine the differences between civil wars, wars of independence, and international conflicts to determine what makes a war a civil war. Conflicts studied will likely include The American Revolution, The American Civil War, the Philippine insurrection, the Chinese Civil War, Vietnam, Afghanistan and the War on Terror, and the Syrian Civil War.

116.43, 21812 MWF 11-11:50, Van Meer

Inventing Modern Europe. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of the European Union. The theme for this course is the interplay between technological structures, economic motivations, and societal aspirations.

210.01, 23546 MWF 10-10:50, Slater

ST: History of Queer America. Reflecting on the continual evolution of queer identities, spaces, and performances, this course offers an exploration into the history of American queer communities and change over time. Beginning with exploration in the seventeenth century and ending in the present day, this class underscores the ways in which queer identities and politics emerged from issues surrounding class, gender, medicine, literature, art, industrialization, race, political movements, and religions. This will also be a class about contested spaces and evolving language, related notions of categorization, and otherness.  We will have a heavy reading and writing load with expectations of significant class participation and research on individual topics of interest.  Everyone is welcome in this safe space that promotes understanding and respect.

211.01, 23205 TR 3:05-4:20, Donaldson

American Urban History. A survey of urban development from nineteenth century to the present. This course examines urbanization as a city-building process and its impact on American social, political and economic life.

217.01 20536 MWF 1:00-1:50, Eaves

African American History since 1865. African American History since 1865 is designed to introduce students to the key people and movements that shaped the Black Experience from the end of the Civil War to the twentieth century and beyond. This course will explore the following themes: African Americans’ efforts to negotiate citizenship after the Civil War; the construction of a Jim Crow America; African Americans’ negotiations for civil rights and economic equality in the twenty-first century; and African American expressions of culture from the Harlem Renaissance to Black Power to Hip Hop. Students will learn how African Americans carved out a place for themselves in a modernizing America and contributed to the fabric of American politics, economics, and culture. 

232.01, 21349 TR 1:40-2:55, Gerrish

Ancient Rome. The city of Rome grew from a tiny settlement on the Palatine Hill to a mighty empire stretching from Britain to Babylon.  In this course we will follow Rome's great generals, statesmen, and enemies from Rome's foundation by Romulus in 753 BCE to the death of Rome's first Christian emperor in 337 CE.  We will focus primarily on the political, military, and economic history of Rome; we will discuss its rich literary and artistic culture, as well. This course examines not just the history of Rome, but also its historiography: that is, how do we know what we think we know about Rome? Can - and should - we separate “history” from “myth”?  And how did ancient authors' conception of “truth” and “fact” differ from our own?

234.01, 23372 MWF 11-11:50, Jestice

ST: Early Middle Ages. This course explores the period of western European history c. 400–c. 1050, beginning with the breakup of the Western Roman Empire.  A major theme of the class will be the implications of that “fall” of Rome—the formation of the Germanic successor states in Europe and how the incoming barbarians adapted and appropriated Roman culture.  If you’ve ever wondered if there really was a King Arthur, if you like Vikings, or if you’ve longed to name a cat Charlemagne, this is the class for you. 

241.02, 22418 TR 10:50-12:05, Coy

ST: Witchcraft and Witch-Hunting in the Modern World. Scholars have long recognized that witchcraft and witch-hunting were both prevalent in premodern Europe. Increasingly, historians have come to recognize that magical belief and the persecution of people deemed to be witches have survived into modern times. In this special topics course, we will explore the survival of witchcraft beliefs in the Enlightenment era as witch-hunting declined, the resurgence of ritual magic and witchcraft in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and manifestations of witchcraft belief and witch-hunting in the contemporary world.

241.03, 23745 MW 5:30-7:00, Lehman & Olejniczak

World War II and Europe: History and Memory.

250.01, 21255 MWF 9:25-10:40, Delay

ST: History of Reproduction. In this course, students examine pregnancy, childbirth, reproduction, and motherhood in comparative history. The focus is on Europe and the Americas since 1600, with particular attention paid to Britain and the British colonies. Specific topics covered include experiences of pregnancy; midwifery and nursing; contraception, abortion, and infanticide; the medicalization of childbirth; and the relationship between motherhood and the modern state. Students will explore not only women’s experiences of reproduction but also the larger political, social, and cultural meanings of pregnancy, birth, and motherhood.

250.02, 23454 TR 12:15-1:30, Krajewski

ST: Latin America & the U. S. Since Independence. In this course, we will examine political, economic, and social interactions between the United States and nations in Latin America from the nineteenth century through current debates over trade, immigration, and crime. The course seeks to widen students’ conception of the meaning of U.S.-Latin American relations beyond U.S. perspectives of diplomatic and political history. Through a combination of formal lecture and discussions of primary and secondary sources, students will gain a familiarity with major themes and trends in the history of Latin America and U.S. foreign relations, all while gaining a deeper understanding of key episodes in our shared history. 

270.01, 21114 TR 12:15-1:30, Piccione

ST: Ancient Egypt Medicine and Medical Practice. This upper-level lecture and discussion course explores the role of medicine in ancient Egyptian society. By understanding the Egyptian healing arts and their social aspects, we comprehend the ancient Egyptians' views toward health and the nature of the human organism and its place in the cosmos. This course sets the practice of Egyptian medicine within the ancient Egyptian world-view, placing it within the framework of Egyptian cosmology, standards of morality and magico-religious beliefs. The focus of this course is the essential nature of Egyptian healing in which deep seated religious notions and so-called magical practices wholly integrated with empirico-rational approaches to form an integrated medical therapy. Topics of study include: the fusion of magical and rational therapies; the theoretical bases of disease (divine and physical); Egyptian therapies, including, surgery, surgical tools, and the uses of trepanation; medical specializations; pharmacology and drugs; mummification; the influence of Egyptian medicine and pharmacopoeia on the Greeks; the Egyptian physician and his role as physician-priest, female physicians, and the existence of sanatoria, i.e., Egyptian temples as centers for medical treatment and pilgrimage. The course pays special attention to magical medicine, the ancient Egyptian medical papyri, their form and content, and what they indicate about the Egyptian approach to treatment, to women's health, including gynaecology and obstetrics, and to dentistry and dental therapies. In this regard, students will read translations of the papyri. Finally, the class will examine the techniques and findings of modern palaeopathology, i.e., the pathological study of mummies and ancient human remains. Here the purpose is to determine the general physical condition of the Egyptians, their standards of health, the biological evidence of disease, and causes of death--all through the use of forensics, X-ray, Computer-aided Temography (CT scanning), Magnetic Resonance Imaging, molecular biology, including DNA and genetic studies.

270.03, 23440 MWF 1-1:50, Martin

ST: The Rise, Splendor, and Fall of Islamic Spain. The south of Spain was the most Roman of Roman territories outside of Italy. When Muslims came conquered much of Spain in the early eighth century, they doubtless saw the ruins of the Roman province, just as did the Muslims in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries who lived through the last the last Christian conquest on the peninsula. For these roughly 800-900 years, then, we have a rich corpus of evidence, with historical chronicles, philosophical treatises, bilingual and even trilingual manuscripts and monuments, and, not least, ascetically-pleasing architecture in cities such as Córdoba, Sevilla, Málaga, Toledo, and Granada. These primary sources will form the broad contours of our look at political, philosophical, and intellectual life in the south of Spain. We will also read past and present scholars—of history and language—interpretations of Islamic Spain. We will read in English, and if you want to read in another language as well, I am happy to guide you.

272.01, 23548 MWF 9-9:50, Shumway

Modern Africa. A history of Africa from the nineteenth century to the present.  Important topics will include abolition of the slave trade, European conquest, anti-colonial movements, the struggle for independence and post-colonial Africa.

283.01, 23453 MWF 10-10:50, Chen

History of Modern China. How did China transform from an insular continental empire to a rising global superpower? By examining the unprecedented social, cultural, economic, and political transformations of “China” from the 18th century to the present, this course aims to provide a critical understanding of the making of modern China. We will start our course with a discussion on the peak of Qing, China’s last imperial dynasty, then move to explore the decline and collapse of the imperial order, the emergence of the modern Chinese nation-state and the founding of the Chinese Republic. We will explore the wars, rebellions, reforms, and revolutions in the long twentieth century and how they reshaped the Chinese society and culture. Also, we will examine the development of the Chinese communist revolution, the upheavals of the Maoist era, and the rapid social and economic reforms in the recent decades.

299.02, 21385 TR 10:50-12:05, Bodek

Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

299.03, 21412 MW 3:25-4:40, Cavalli

Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of History. HIST 299 is the foundational course of the History major and is designed to prepare History majors and minors for upper-level courses and for the capstone research seminar. The theme for this section of 299 is early modern Europe.

320.01, 23406 T 6-8:45 pm, Stockton

ST: Modern Charleston. Modern Charleston – an oxymoron? Actually Charleston has had a diverse history – sometimes sleepy, sometimes dynamic, and sometimes both at the same time – during the twentieth century, and initial years of the twenty-first. Explore economic, cultural, political, demographic, and other factors in the history of a resilient city.

336.01, 23407 MW 2-3:15, Cavalli

Italian Renaissance. What is the Italian Renaissance and why do westerners continue to be fascinated with it as a time period? What was “modern” about the revival of the culture of classical antiquity? What was specifically Italian about this revival and what historical conditions led to Italy losing prominence in Europe as the early modern period progressed? This course considers these questions by focusing on the intellectual, political, socioeconomic, cultural and religious developments in Italy from roughly 1350 to the death of Duke Cosimo I of Florence in 1560. Specific lecture and reading themes include the question of Renaissance individualism, the social and political impact of medieval developments such communes, the Black Death, and Great Schism, the influence of classical ideals on education, the operation of city-states, gender roles and behavior, artistic patronage, religious expression, and the impact of developing nation states on Italian politics. 

350.01, 22212 TR 1:40-2:55, Boucher

ST: French Colonial North America.  This course will survey the history of French colonial North America to 1763.  Among other things, it will examine the causes of French expansion in the region; the composition of the migrant population and the reasons for their relocation; the socio-political structure of colonial communities as well as the nature of French relations with Native Americans and neighboring European powers.

361.02, 23455 MW 2-3:15, Chen

ST: Women and Gender in Modern East Asia. This course examines modern Asian history from the late 19th century to the present from the perspective of gender and sexuality. We will explore how the roles of women and the idea of gender were reorganized during this period in relation to the formation of the modern Chinese and Japanese states. In addition to examining the gender ideologies and policies of the modern states, we will also consider how conceptions of gender shaped and were shaped by issues of labor, the family, class, ethnicity, sexuality, and consumer culture. We will read both recent historical works and primary sources, including fiction, essays, biographies, and films. 

370.01, 23325 TR 9:25-10:40, Gerrish

ST: The Roman Revolution. Less than two decades passed between the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE and the establishment of the Augustan principate, but these years were marked by swift and often violent change. Rapid political shifts were accompanied by social and cultural upheavals as Rome sought to redefine itself against a backdrop of civil war. In this course we will investigate the factors that led to the dissolution of the Roman Republic and the creation of the Roman Empire, as well as how the civil wars threatened the Romans’ sense of shared identity. We will also explore the ways in which modern commentators, influenced by their own political circumstances, have interpreted the so-called “Roman Revolution.”

410.01, 21290 TR 9:25-10:40, Domby

ST: US History on Slavery in Charleston. This is the capstone research seminar for history majors. Your primary objective in this course is to produce an original and carefully researched 25-page paper. Assignments related to these papers will be due throughout the semester, and during the last third of the semester regular class meetings will often be replaced by short one-on-one meetings with the instructor in order to give you the time you need to conduct research and work on your papers. The course will focus on the history of slavery in the Carolina low country, with an emphasis on Charleston and the College of Charleston's campus. 

441.01, 22213 MW 2-3:15, Delay

ST: History of the Body. In this seminar, which is the capstone experience for History majors, advanced undergraduate students will conduct independent and original research projects focusing on the history of the body in European history. Students will research and write 30-35 page seminar papers under the professor’s supervision; in these papers, students will be expected to develop and defend their own arguments and interpretations and will analyze both primary sources and historiography. The history of the body is a timely topic that intersects with the histories of politics, religion, empire, sex, medicine, crime, and more.

461.01, 22058 TR 10:50-12:05, Mikati

ST: Islam and the World. This seminar will guide you in primary source research and writing on a topic related to Islam and the World in order to complete a 25-page paper.