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Spring 2018 Course Offerings

Course Descriptions

104.01, 21156 MWF 8-8:50  Crosby

World History from 1500 CE to Present. History 104 will cover world history from 1500 CE to the present, and covers the chief political, social, economic, cultural, and religious developments in that period. The objectives of the course are to examine the interaction between different cultures with differing worldviews, globalization (the increasing interconnection between economies, societies, and their ideas), and the effects of industrialization, modernization, imperialism, decolonization, and their consequences, and the effects of the two world war.

115.01, 20521 MWF 8-8:50  Martin

115.02, 20522 MWF 9-9:50  Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.03, 20524 MWF 9-9:50  Cavalli

Saints, Heretics, and Reformers. This course will survey the development of Christian ideas and religious practice from the medieval to the early modern periods in Europe. It asks, what historical conditions and ideas guided religious practice and contributed to the way individuals experienced spirituality? What characteristics and institutions define a good Christian community or society? and What is the relationship between the sacred and the secular? Topics include mystic and visionary experiences, tension between worldly and spiritual authority, monastic life, religious outsiders and heresy, Protestant and Catholic reform movements, witchcraft, and confessional wars of religion. 

115.04, 20525 MWF 9-9:50  Smith

A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.05, 20526 MWF 10-10:50  Martin

115.06, 21481 TR 3:05-4:20  TBA

115.07, 21182 TR 10:20-11:35 (NORTH CAMPUS)  Crosby

Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of  society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines. 

115.08, 20528 MWF 10-10:50  Cavalli

Saints, Heretics, and Reformers. This course will survey the development of Christian ideas and religious practice from the medieval to the early modern periods in Europe. It asks, what historical conditions and ideas guided religious practice and contributed to the way individuals experienced spirituality? What characteristics and institutions define a good Christian community or society? and What is the relationship between the sacred and the secular? Topics include mystic and visionary experiences, tension between worldly and spiritual authority, monastic life, religious outsiders and heresy, Protestant and Catholic reform movements, witchcraft, and confessional wars of religion. 

115.09, 20529 MWF 11-11:50  Martin

115.10, 20531 MWF 10-10:50  Smith

A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.11, 21758 W 6-8:45 (NORTH CAMPUS)  TBA

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. Unifying theme: As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

115.12, 20532 MWF 12-12:50  Halvorson

The Ancient World and Religion. A historical survey of the main currents of political, social, religious and intellectual activity from the earliest civilizations to 700 C.E.  The major civilizations of the ancient world are considered and compared with an emphasis on religious views.

115.13, 20533 MWF 12-12:50  Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. Unifying theme: As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

115.14, 21546 MW 5:30-6:45  TBA

115.15, 20535 MWF 1-1:50  Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. Unifying theme: As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

115.16, 20536 MW 2-3:15  Martin

115.17, 20537 MW 3:25-4:40  Cavalli

Sex and the Body in the Premodern West. This course is an introduction to the history of gender and sexuality from the ancient to the early modern period in Europe. It explores political, religious, intellectual, social, cultural, and medical influences on the organization and regulation of ideas about the sexed body. It considers topics such as witchcraft, marriage and courtship, holy virginity and mysticism, widowhood, prostitution, and the way ideas about gender and sexuality organized institutions and communities. It asks the questions: what is the relationship between gender, sexuality, and understandings of the body? How have claims about gender and sexuality fueled religious, political, social, and scientific debate? What are the roles of religion, the state, and the family in shaping ideas about femininity and masculinity?

115.18, 20538 MW 2-3:15  Halvorson

The Ancient World and Religion. A historical survey of the main currents of political, social, religious and intellectual activity from the earliest civilizations to 700 C.E.  The major civilizations of the ancient world are considered and compared with an emphasis on religious views.

115.19, 20539 MW 3:25-4:40  Halvorson

The Ancient World and Religion. A historical survey of the main currents of political, social, religious and intellectual activity from the earliest civilizations to 700 C.E.  The major civilizations of the ancient world are considered and compared with an emphasis on religious views.

115.20, 22510 MW 2-3:15  Phillips

Serpents, Demons, and Divas in Western Civilization. This course analyzes the relationship between religion and gender from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to the early modern European period.  We will see how both religious conceptions of the universe and gendered conceptions of the human person shaped one another and structured a variety of societies across time.  How did religion shape the idea of manhood and womanhood?  Are religious myths primarily responsible for the oppression of women and sexual minorities or are other factors more crucial?  Students will examine primary sources ranging from court cases involving adultery in classical Greece to documents related to the witch trials of early modern Europe to answer these questions. 

115.21, 21333 MW 3:25-4:40  Phillips

Serpents, Demons, and Divas in Western Civilization. This course analyzes the relationship between religion and gender from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to the early modern European period.  We will see how both religious conceptions of the universe and gendered conceptions of the human person shaped one another and structured a variety of societies across time.  How did religion shape the idea of manhood and womanhood?  Are religious myths primarily responsible for the oppression of women and sexual minorities or are other factors more crucial?  Students will examine primary sources ranging from court cases involving adultery in classical Greece to documents related to the witch trials of early modern Europe to answer these questions. 

115.23, 20542 TR 8-9:15  TBA

115.24, 20544 TR 12:15-1:30  Mikati

Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.25,20550 TR 12:15-1:30  Shumway

Africa in Premodern World History. This course will examine human history from earliest times to the fifteenth century from the perspective of the African continent and its people.  Important topics will include migration, Ancient Egypt and the spread of Islam.

115.26, 20972 MWF 11-11:50  Lary

History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in world history, from prehistory to roughly 1450 C.E. The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise. Some of the key philosophies and religions we will examine are: Judaism, Hinduism, Pre-Socratic Philosophies, Christianity, Platonism, Buddhism and Islam.

115.27, 21179 TR 1:40-2:55  Shumway

Africa in Premodern World History. This course will examine human history from earliest times to the fifteenth century from the perspective of the African continent and its people.  Important topics will include migration, Ancient Egypt and the spread of Islam.

115.28, 21590 MWF 11-11:50  Halvorson

The Ancient World and Religion. A historical survey of the main currents of political, social, religious and intellectual activity from the earliest civilizations to 700 C.E.  The major civilizations of the ancient world are considered and compared with an emphasis on religious views.

115.29, 21591 TR 12:15-1:30  Piccione

World History through Hollywood Film. This course provides a survey of selected civilizations in world history from 3,000BC to 1300 AD. It focuses on deconstructing mythologies, false perceptions and popular misconceptions about those civilizations by examining popular Hollywood films and foreign cinematic spectacles. Students will study specific historical issues, view ten (10) films and analyze discrepancies between fact and fiction. They will also consider the efficacy and value of historiophoty or filmic history, an emerging field of historiography that advocates fictionalized historical films to recreate and understand historical processes. The course will study the strengths and limitations of film entertainment as a medium of historical expression. Hence, students will understand to what extent historical films might or might not portray an accurate view of the past, as well as how history itself--in film and elsewhere--is often distorted for a variety of reasons, including: dramatic license, to propagandize particular interpretations, advocate change, as well as to accommodate society's needs to sanitize and/or mythologize its (or another's) past, or else to indict or criminalize it.

115.31, 21332 T 4-6:45  Coates

Pre-Modern History. A survey of the major developments in World history to 1500.  This course will examine ideas and events connected to world religions and their associated pilgrimages and long-distance connections. Each of the major world religions will be examined along with their pilgrimage, the Crusades, and the Reconquista in Iberia.

115.32, 22078 TR 8-9:15  TBA

115.33, 22203 MWF 1-1:50  Lary

History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in world history, from prehistory to roughly 1450 C.E. The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise. Some of the key philosophies and religions we will examine are: Judaism, Hinduism, Pre-Socratic Philosophies, Christianity, Platonism, Buddhism and Islam.

116.01, 21933 MWF 10-10:50  Crout

MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD SINCE 1600: THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION. What do the material objects that are important to you tell others about who you are?  This course concentrates on the role objects (material culture) have played in defining who “we” are through studying the artifacts we leave behind such as architecture, household goods, art, foods, clothing, and style.  Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World since 1600.

116.02, 20556 MWF 8-8:50  Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam. Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.03, 20557 MWF 9-9:50  Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam. Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.04, 20558 MWF 8-8:50  Van Meer

Modern Europe, the Quest for the North Pole. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the historical thread uniting all our topics is “the North Pole”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.05, 20559 MWF 9-9:50  Van Meer

Modern Europe, the Quest for the North Pole. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the historical thread uniting all our topics is “the North Pole”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.06, 20560 TR 1:40-2:55  TBA

116.07, 20561 MWF 1-1:50  Crout

MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD SINCE 1600: THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTIONWhat do the material objects that are important to you tell others about who you are?  This course concentrates on the role objects (material culture) have played in defining who “we” are through studying the artifacts we leave behind such as architecture, household goods, art, foods, clothing, and style.  Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World since 1600.

116.08, 20562 MWF 1-1:50  Smith

Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.09, 20563 MWF 11-11:50  Slater

Gender, Race, and Sex in the Modern West. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of the complicated relationships between Enlightenment ideas of liberty and equality and the struggle for their application in Europe and America from 1750-present. The focus will be on gendered, sexual, and racial liberties. The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage a series of historical topics/moments related to gender and race in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexualities.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint), documentaries, and discussion.  You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

116.10, 20566 MWF 11-11:50  Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?  

116.11, 20567 MWF 10-10:50  Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?  

116.12, 22105 MWF 10-10:50  Crosby

Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. Course Description: History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved.   The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.13, 20569 TR 8-9:15  Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.14, 22106 MWF 12-12:50  Smith

Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.15, 20570 TR 1:40-2:55  Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.16, 20571 MW 2-3:15  Lehman

Folktales and the National Project: Reading Modern Political History in Folktales. Beginning in the 18th century and moving through the 20th century, this class explores the modern national political project through three sets of folktales: German, Japanese, and Nigerian. Looking at how governments, scholars, and local groups fought over group identity, the class will use folktales to examine the similarities and differences between the resulting idea of being German, Japanese, and Nigerian. Reading tales like Cinderella, Momotarō, and the novel Things Fall Apart, this course will do deep readings to understand culture as a political project both to instill in a majority population and for export (cultural politics). In so doing, the course briefly touches on the idea of empire, colonization, and independence. 

116.17, 20572 TR 9:25-10:40  Boucher

Western Representations of Native Americans since the Renaissance. This course will survey the history of Western societies from the Renaissance to the present and focus on the following question:  How have changing cultural values in the Western world shaped local perceptions of Native Americans over time.  As this class will show, Western depictions of Native Americans have often revealed more about the societies that produced them than about the indigenous peoples they intended to describe.  Whether it was during the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, or the late nineteenth century, the Western discourse on American Indians has been deeply colored by the values, anxieties, and fantasies that characterized each period.   Therefore, such representations cannot be understood without reference to the historical context that informed them.

116.18, 20573 TR 10:50-12:05  Boucher

Western Representations of Native Americans since the Renaissance. This course will survey the history of Western societies from the Renaissance to the present and focus on the following question:  How have changing cultural values in the Western world shaped local perceptions of Native Americans over time.  As this class will show, Western depictions of Native Americans have often revealed more about the societies that produced them than about the indigenous peoples they intended to describe.  Whether it was during the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, or the late nineteenth century, the Western discourse on American Indians has been deeply colored by the values, anxieties, and fantasies that characterized each period.   Therefore, such representations cannot be understood without reference to the historical context that informed them.

116.19, 20574 TR 9:25-10:40  Domby

Civil War, Insurgency, and Terrorism in Modern History. This course explores modern history through an examination of armed conflict. This class will focus on the changing nature of warfare in the modern era through the lens of civil wars and insurgencies. The class will examine the differences between civil wars, wars of independence, and international conflicts to determine what makes a war a civil war. Conflicts studied will likely include The American Revolution, The American Civil War, the Philippine insurrection, the Chinese Civil War, Vietnam, Afghanistan and the War on Terror, and the Syrian Civil War.

116.20, 22511 MW 4-5:15  Lehman

Folktales and the National Project: Reading Modern Political History in Folktales. Beginning in the 18th century and moving through the 20th century, this class explores the modern national political project through three sets of folktales: German, Japanese, and Nigerian. Looking at how governments, scholars, and local groups fought over group identity, the class will use folktales to examine the similarities and differences between the resulting idea of being German, Japanese, and Nigerian. Reading tales like Cinderella, Momotarō, and the novel Things Fall Apart, this course will do deep readings to understand culture as a political project both to instill in a majority population and for export (cultural politics). In so doing, the course briefly touches on the idea of empire, colonization, and independence. 

116.24, 21542 TR 8:55-10:10 (NORTH CAMPUS)  Crosby

Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. Course Description: History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved.   The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.25, 21392 MWF 1-1:50  Van Meer

Inventing Modern Europe. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of the European Union. The theme for this course is the interplay between technological structures, economic motivations, and societal aspirations (including, e.g. the architecture of the Renaissance, the slave ship of the Atlantic economy, the factory of the Industrial Revolution, and the Channel tunnel connecting Britain and France at the height of the European Union).

116.26, 20577 TR 10:50-12:05  Covert

History and Memory. This course explores modern history through the lens of history and memory. We will analyze how individuals, institutions, and governments have sought to remember or tried to forget historical events, people, and artifacts in modern world history ranging from Columbus’s arrival in the Caribbean to the present. In addition to learning about such historical topics as imperialism, authoritarianism, slavery, and war, then, students will also grapple with the political and economic implications of history and how it is commemorated, represented, or erased. This course will introduce students to broad historical currents in modern history and enable them to think more critically about history as a process, rather than as a static list of names and dates.

116.27, 20579 TR 10:50-12:05 Domby

Civil War, Insurgency, and Terrorism in Modern History. This course explores modern history through an examination of armed conflict. This class will focus on the changing nature of warfare in the modern era through the lens of civil wars and insurgencies. The class will examine the differences between civil wars, wars of independence, and international conflicts to determine what makes a war a civil war. Conflicts studied will likely include The American Revolution, The American Civil War, the Philippine insurrection, the Chinese Civil War, Vietnam, Afghanistan and the War on Terror, and the Syrian Civil War.

116.28, 20580 TR 12:15-1:30  Poole

Satan and Evil: A History of Bad Ideas. This class examines the history of the modern western world by examining how religion, culture, politics and society have imagined and re-imagined the concept of the Devil and the history of evil from the Enlightenment to the Age of Revolution, through two World Wars and up to the present.

116.31, 20581 TR 12:15-1:30  Donaldson

Sing for Freedom. Music has been a ubiquitous feature in protest movements of the 19th through 20th centuries. Through song, protestors have been able to express their grievances and sustain their morale in their struggles for social, cultural, political, and economic change. Music, therefore, is an important historical text that provides access to understanding the circumstances that gave rise to protest movements and insight into the motivations of activist historical actors. In this course we will examine the history of protest movements in the United States and around the world through the songs that activists created, adapted, and shared among each other and across national borders. 

116.32, 20582 TR 1:40-2:55  Donaldson

Sing for Freedom. Music has been a ubiquitous feature in protest movements of the 19th through 20th centuries. Through song, protestors have been able to express their grievances and sustain their morale in their struggles for social, cultural, political, and economic change. Music, therefore, is an important historical text that provides access to understanding the circumstances that gave rise to protest movements and insight into the motivations of activist historical actors. In this course we will examine the history of protest movements in the United States and around the world through the songs that activists created, adapted, and shared among each other and across national borders. 

116.33, 20583 TR 12:15-1:30  Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.37, 21331 MWF 12-12:50  Crout

MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD SINCE 1600: THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTIONWhat do the material objects that are important to you tell others about who you are?  This course concentrates on the role objects (material culture) have played in defining who “we” are through studying the artifacts we leave behind such as architecture, household goods, art, foods, clothing, and style.  Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World since 1600.

116.40, 21397 TR 3:05-4:20  Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.41, 20584 M 6-8:45 (NORTH CAMPUS)  Davis

Modern History. The theme of the course is the advance of liberty. The time period of the course is 1750 to 1850 and beyond. The regions of concern are Europe, the United States, Canada, and Latin America. Types of historical topics considered include political, intellectual, economic, social, and artistic topics. Additionally, an ongoing concern of the course is how history relates to contemporary questions and issues.

116.42, 21396 MWF 12-12:50  Van Meer

Inventing Modern Europe. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of the European Union. The theme for this course is the interplay between technological structures, economic motivations, and societal aspirations (including, e.g. the architecture of the Renaissance, the slave ship of the Atlantic economy, the factory of the Industrial Revolution, and the Channel tunnel connecting Britain and France at the height of the European Union).

116.43, 22204 MW 3:25-4:40  Rizzo

War & Society.  This course is designed to familiarize you with some of the wars that have shaped societies throughout the world in the modern era. The reasons why nations go to war, the institutions built to wage war, the evolving relationship between society and the military establishment, and the way that wars are represented are some of the topics we will discuss throughout the semester. This is not a “great battles of history” course (even though tactics and battles will play a significant part in our work throughout the semester). Rather, the course will focus at every turn on the entirety of people’s complex relationship with armed conflict. 

202.01, 21646 MWF 10-10:50  Powers

U.S. History 1865-Present. This course provides a  general and thematic study of the culture, society and politics of the United States from the Civil War to the present.   Among the topics considered are: Reconstruction, settlement of the West, the "Robber Barons" and reformers, America at war, the Great Depression and the New Deal, the Cold War and Red Scares, mass consumerism, the civil rights and other social reform movements as well as themes in recent American politics and society.

210.01, 22093 MWF 12-12:50  Rabin

Special Topics: Religion & US Immigration. The United States has been praised as a nation of immigrants, and is among the most religiously diverse countries in the world. At the same time, both anti-immigration sentiment and religious bigotry have been persistent themes in American history. This course will explore intersections of immigration and religion from the nineteenth century to the present day. We will discuss how religion has affected American perceptions of and policies toward immigrants, how immigrant religious communities have adapted to the American environment, and how second-generation Americans have represented their religious communities in literature and film. 

210.02, 22574 MWF 1-1:50  Powers

Special Topics: Civil Rights Movement. This course provides a detailed study of the U.S. civil rights movement.  It begins with the late nineteenth century which witnesses the rise of disfranchisement, Jim Crow and racially inspired violence.  The rise, activities, challenges and achievements of major and less well known civil rights organizations, their leaders and constituencies propel the course through the twentieth century.  A major goal is to explore how this ongoing struggle for racial justice and its consequences had dramatic and significant implications for modern American history and society.  Special attention is devoted to important personalities and organizations, philosophical tensions and conflicts, politics, as well as gender and cultural themes.

215.01, 23299 TR 1:40-2:55  Boucher

Native American History. The course is a chronological survey in Native American History north of Mexico to the present.  This class will provide an alternative to the traditional master narrative of the region by placing Native Americans at the center of the historical stage.  As such, students will be encouraged to re-assess the role First Nations have played in the history of the continent and question enduring myths about the subject matter.  This course will also provide critical background to understand basic issues facing indigenous communities today.  In the process, students will develop a historiographical knowledge of the subject matter and will be introduced to ethnohistory, a research method designed to study the history of peoples who have left no written records. 

217.01, 20585 MWF 12-12:50  Powers

African American History 1865-Present. This course examines the historical experience of African Americans beginning with the period following the Civil War and continuing until the present time.  Among the topics considered are:  Reconstruction, blacks and the New South, African American leadership, the impact of the world wars, consequences of the Great Depression and New Deal, and the rise of civil rights activism.

222.01, 23701 T 6-8:45  Stockton

History of South Carolina. South Carolina from the colonial period to the present. Topics discussed include plantation slavery, Southern nationalism, pro-slavery ideology, the nullification crisis, the secessionist movement and the Civil War, the disintegration of slavery and the transition to a free labor economy, regional diversification and the slow process of modernization that continued throughout the 20th century. 

224.01, 23300 TR 12:15-1:30  Domby

History of South to 1865. 

232.01, 21480 TR 8-9:15  Gerrish

Ancient Rome. (Crosslisted from the Classics Dept)

241.01, 22201 TR 10:50-12:05  Coy

Special Topics: Stuart-Tudor Britain. This course will explore the history of early modern Britain from the late fifteenth until the early eighteenth century, with an emphasis on political and religious history.  

241.02, 23710 M 5:30-8:00 Rosengarten

Special Topics: Nazi Medicine. This course explores the biomedical vision at the heart of Nazi thought: the program of "human selection" that sought to remake the demography of Europe by placing the “health” of the state over the individual; the "cleansing" of the German medical profession; so called medical experimentation as a tool of political and social conquest; and the pursuit of personal gain over the exercise of medical ethics. 

250.01, 21368 MW 2-3:15  Olejniczak

Special Topics: The Second World War. 

256.01, 23708  MWF 12-12:50 Lehman

History of Science and Technology. This class explores the development of science and technology in modern European history using three case studies. First, students will explore Frankenstein (Shelly, 1818) and look at the concepts of natural philosophy and science (particularly chemistry and anatomy) during the age of reason. In the second unit, using Metropolis (Lang, 1927) and the development of nitrate, students will explore how technology changed society leading up to the World Wars. The class’s third unit will turn to the nuclear age, using the graphic novel Trinity (Fetter-Vorm, 2012), the film War Game (Watkins, 1965), and video games to discuss nuclear fission and power during the Cold War. Using those texts and others, students will explore related scientific developments and situate them in their historical socio-political contexts, examining both the science behind technological development as well as associated ethnical dilemmas and social change. 

270.01, 21218 MWF 11-11:50  Jestice

Special Topics: The Calamitous Fourteenth Century. In the fourteenth century C.E., Europe suffered massive systemic failures.  Changing weather patterns, paired with population growth over the preceding two centuries, resulted in massive famines.  And then came the Black Death, the cycles of which ultimately resulted in a European population decline of as much as 50%.  This course will examine the unsustainable practices that lay behind Europe’s extended fourteenth-century crisis; the response of governments, other institutions, and individuals to the crisis; and the gradual creation of a more sustainable Europe.

270.02, 21328 TR 9:25-10:40  Piccione

Special Topics: The Kingdoms of Ancient Egypt. Using texts and archaeology, this course focuses on the central time-frame of Egyptian history from the Old Kingdom through the Middle Kingdom to the end of the New Kingdom (Egyptian Empire).  These periods mark high points and recurring collapse of the classical Egyptian experience (ca. 2700-1070 BC).  Topics include: political and historical developments, geography and environment, pyramid building, social institutions, status of women, religion and language and writing. The class will also consider Egyptian social contacts with the Nubian and Kushite kingdoms of the Upper Nile Valley, as well as with the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations of the Aegean region.

273.01, 22202 MWF 9-9:50  Carmichael

Modern Africa.

277.01, 23306 TR 10:50-12:05  Mikati

Modern Middle East. Tradition, modernization, and change in the contemporary Islamic world. The impact of nationalism, secularism, and Westernization in the Middle East, from the disintegration of the Ottoman Empire and emergence of successor states, to the Arab-Israeli conflict, the oil crisis and Great Power confrontation. 

299.02, 21521 MW 2-3:15  Cavalli

Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

299.03, 21556 TR 10:50-12:05  Coates

Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

302.01, 23297 MWF 1-1:50  Slater

History of the American Revolution, 1765-1800. The History of the American Revolution began long before 1776, as does the timeline of the course.  Beginning at the conclusion of the Seven Years War, this class follows the development of a cultural and political consciousness in the original thirteen colonies and how victory in the War of Independence was not a foregone conclusion.  Including perspectives from American soldiers, Native Americans, slaves, and British and Hessian soldiers, the American Revolution was the prelude to, in many ways, an even larger battle: that of government. Following the Battle of Yorktown in 1781 and the Treaty of Paris in 1783, the United States struggled to forge an identity independent from British economic and political influences.  This class studies the failed Articles of Confederation and the controversies of the Constitutional Convention, ending in 1800. 1800 was a watershed year for America and witnessed the creation of the two party political system familiar to us today.  It is important to understand the American Revolution through the eyes of all participants and witnesses by incorporating primary and secondary sources.  Though there will be military history, this is largely a cultural, political, economic, and social history course.  There will a significant amount of reading and writing.

347.01, 23305 TR 9:25-10:40  Delay

Special Topics: Women in Britain and Ireland, 1700-1914. This is a course that a select group of CofC students will take jointly with students at Queen’s University Belfast. This collaborative course across the Atlantic explores women’s lives in Britain and Ireland from approximately 1700 to 1914. It addresses women’s interactions with, and contributions to, key events including the Enlightenment, Industrial Revolution, and political movements. It also, however, focuses on social and cultural history, asking how deviant or outcast women experienced daily life. Specific topics studied include the development of European gender norms, crime and criminality, pregnancy and childbirth, witchcraft, and marriage.

350.01, 23474 TR 3:05-4:20  Poole

Special Topics: Histories of Death: Gothic and Social Revolution from the 18th century to the Present. The 18th century represented the Age of Reason in Europe and North America. At least that’s one version of the story. More than two hundred years later, horror films remain America and Western Europe’s most profitable genre. Secular Britain had a vampire panic in the early 70s. Contemporary teenagers devour novels with plots that would be recognizable to Matthew Lewis, Anne Radcliffe, and their readers in the 1790s. This class will explore how revolutionary social change and gothic histories have long been each other’s shadow in the western world.

350.02, 22100 MW 2-3:15  Slucki

Special Topics: After the Holocaust. This course examines the impact of the Holocaust on Jews and on the world. Beginning in the immediate aftermath of the Holocaust, it will explore efforts to attain justice in the decades following World War II, and at the various ways the Holocaust has come to be remembered. It will then look at the impact of the Holocaust on Jewish communities worldwide, and will finally consider contemporary issues that Jews face, particularly in light of the ongoing effects of the Holocaust’s trauma. 

364.01, 23301 TR 12:15-1:30  Coates

Sugar and Slaves in Colonial Brazil. This course provides an overview of the history of Brazil from the arrival of the Portuguese in 1500 to Brazilian independence in the 1820s. I place emphasis on colonial society, especially the themes of slavery and sugar and how colonial Brazilian society was linked with the Atlantic economy of Portugal and Africa (especially Angola) and the greater Portuguese Empire. 

410.01, 21410 TR 10:50-12:05  Clark

Research Seminar: History of the Foreign Relations of the United States. This course is designed to enhance investigative, analytical, and compositional skills.  Requirements include a substantial research paper of 25-30 pages a formal report, and critiques.  The student may choose a topic from a list or develop another in consultation with the instructor.  The paper is to be based upon primary sources as well as secondary works and must include an annotated bibliography and essential footnotes. The course will establish the foundations of American foreign policy during the early republic, follow the activities of our diplomats and agents abroad, and provide contrasting interpretations of various episodes in our foreign relations. 

441.01, 23475 MW 2-3:15  Delay

Special Topics: History of the Body. In this seminar advanced undergraduate students will conduct independent and original research projects focusing on the history of the body in European history. Students will research and write 30-35 page seminar papers under the professor’s supervision; in these papers, students will be expected to develop and defend their own arguments and interpretations and will analyze both primary sources and historiography. The history of the body is a timely topic that intersects with the histories of politics, religion, empire, sex, medicine, crime, and more. The focus of our readings will be Europe since 1600 with some comparative elements as well.

461.01, 23302 TR 9:25-10:40  Shumway

Research Seminar: The Atlantic World and Africa. This course examines the making and transformation of the Atlantic world occasioned by maritime trade between Europe, Africa and the Americas, c. 1450-1850, with an emphasis on Africa.  How did the opening of maritime Atlantic trade relations shape Africa?  And how, in turn, did Africans transform the Atlantic world?  We will explore political transformations, cultural syncretism and cosmopolitanism within African societies in this period.  We will also study the proliferation of violence--including the enslavement of millions of African men, women and children who fell victim to the transatlantic slave trade.