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Fall 2019 Course Offerings

Course Descriptions

103.01, 10954 MWF 8-8:50, Crosby

World History to 1500. This course covers world history from prehistory to circa 1500 CE, focusing on economic, social, political, and cultural aspects of people before the onset of western dominance and identifying major patterns and trends which characterized the world in each era.

115.01, 11048 TR 3:05-4:20, Halvorson

Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.03, 10886 TR 9:25-10:40, Mikati

Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.05, 10887 TR 10:50-12:05, Mikati

Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.06, 10888 MWF 9-9:50, Smith

A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.07, 10889 MWF 10-10:50, Smith

A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.08, 10890 MWF 12-12:50, Van Meer

A World of Inventions. This course explores the history of our world, from the first hunter-gatherer societies until the dawn of modernity in the 16th century, using the comparative method. The theme of this global history course is invention and technology. By contextualizing key inventions of the past, e.g. prehistoric stone tools, Mesoamerican and Asian agriculture, early Egyptian and Chinese tombs, Byzantine and Islamic fashion, Medieval European and Japanese swords, and Chinese and European ocean-faring ships, we will examine how technological developments were interconnected with environmental, political, cultural, social, and economic practices.

115.09, 10891 MWF 11-11:50, Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.10, 10892 MWF 12-12:50, Martin

Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will explore the history of the pre-modern world.  Rather than covering the history of the world, an impossible task, we will focus upon travel.  Our discussions will treat the accounts of travelers in Europe, Asia, and Africa, as well as the movement of disease, the importance of infrastructure such as land and sea trade routes, and technology such as maps and compasses. Our sources will include art, architecture, and texts that travelers wrote.  These will help us to understand how travelers interacted with different people and environments, while also illuminating the dynamism of the pre-modern world.

115.11, 10893 MWF 11-11:50, Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. Unifying theme: As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

115.12, 10894 MWF 12-12:50, Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. Unifying theme: As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

115.13, 10895 MWF 8-8:50, Martin

Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will explore the history of the pre-modern world.  Rather than covering the history of the world, an impossible task, we will focus upon travel.  Our discussions will treat the accounts of travelers in Europe, Asia, and Africa, as well as the movement of disease, the importance of infrastructure such as land and sea trade routes, and technology such as maps and compasses. Our sources will include art, architecture, and texts that travelers wrote.  These will help us to understand how travelers interacted with different people and environments, while also illuminating the dynamism of the pre-modern world.

115.14, 10896 MWF 12-12:50, Lary

History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in the ancient world.  The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise.  While we will address many ancient philosophies and religions in this course, the primary focus will be on three case studies: the empires of ancient Greece, ancient India, and ancient Persia.  In ancient Greece, the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics through the Hellenistic thinkers will be highlighted and placed within the cultural and political context.  In ancient India, we will pay particular attention to the development of the competing yet symbiotic teachings of ancient Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. Finally, our study of ancient Persia will begin with the history of ancient Zoroastrianism. 

115.15, 10897 MWF 1-1:50, Lary

History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in the ancient world.  The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise.  While we will address many ancient philosophies and religions in this course, the primary focus will be on three case studies: the empires of ancient Greece, ancient India, and ancient Persia.  In ancient Greece, the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics through the Hellenistic thinkers will be highlighted and placed within the cultural and political context.  In ancient India, we will pay particular attention to the development of the competing yet symbiotic teachings of ancient Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. Finally, our study of ancient Persia will begin with the history of ancient Zoroastrianism. 

115.16, 10899 MW 2:00-3:15, Krajewski

Crisis and Response in the Iberian World. This course begins with the Muslim conquests of the Iberian Peninsula and ends with the final reconquest by the Catholic monarchs at the end of the fifteenth century. It will focus on ecological, biological, and environmental pressures, with particular emphasis on the Little Ice Age, the Great Famine, and the Black Death.

115.19, 12054 MW 2:00-3:15, Phillips

Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.24, 10906 TR 1:40-2:55, Schaffer

Premodern Piracy. This section of History 115 will focus on maritime piracy, from ancient Egypt through the early English Empire (c. 1500s). While most people are familiar with Caribbean piracy, popularized by movies such as Pirates of the Caribbean, this class will look back at the ancient roots of one of humanity's longest military threats. How did ancient empires deal with maritime threats? Were pirates always considered enemies? Did piracy and religious conflict interact? How did piracy contribute to the development of New World colonization? Find out in this class! 

115.25, 10907 MWF 9-9:50, Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.26, 13779 MWF 9-9:50, Martin

Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will explore the history of the pre-modern world.  Rather than covering the history of the world, an impossible task, we will focus upon travel.  Our discussions will treat the accounts of travelers in Europe, Asia, and Africa, as well as the movement of disease, the importance of infrastructure such as land and sea trade routes, and technology such as maps and compasses. Our sources will include art, architecture, and texts that travelers wrote.  These will help us to understand how travelers interacted with different people and environments, while also illuminating the dynamism of the pre-modern world.

115.28, 10909 TR 1:40-2:55, Halvorson

Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.30, 11528 TR 3:05-4:20, Schaffer

Premodern Piracy. This section of History 115 will focus on maritime piracy, from ancient Egypt through the early English Empire (c. 1500s). While most people are familiar with Caribbean piracy, popularized by movies such as Pirates of the Caribbean, this class will look back at the ancient roots of one of humanity's longest military threats. How did ancient empires deal with maritime threats? Were pirates always considered enemies? Did piracy and religious conflict interact? How did piracy contribute to the development of New World colonization? Find out in this class!

115.32, 11418 TR 8:55-10:10 NORTH CAMPUS, Crosby

Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of  society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines. 

115.33, 11527 MW 3:25-4:40, Phillips

Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.34, 11427 M 6-8:45 pm, NORTH CAMPUS, Davis

Pre-Modern History. The theme of the course is the definition of civilization.  The time period of the course is prehistory to 1500. The primary regions of concern are Europe, Africa, the Middle East, India, and China. Types of historical topics considered include political, intellectual, economic, social, and artistic topics.  Additionally, an ongoing concern of the course is how history relates to contemporary questions and issues.

115.35, 11428 MW 3:25-4:40, Krajewski

Crisis and Response in the Iberian World. This course begins with the Muslim conquests of the Iberian Peninsula and ends with the final reconquest by the Catholic monarchs at the end of the fifteenth century. It will focus on ecological, biological, and environmental pressures, with particular emphasis on the Little Ice Age, the Great Famine, and the Black Death.

115.36, 12443 TR 9:25-10:40, Halvorson

Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.37, 12444 TR 10:50-12:05, Halvorson

Egypt and its Neighbors. 3000+ Years of the Ancient Egyptian World. This class will cover over three millennia of history in Egypt and the surrounding civilizations with which they interacted. Egypt in its heyday was a world power which influenced three continents: Africa, Asia, and Europe. Travel back in time with an Egyptologist to study, in detail, one of the greatest civilizations of the pre-modern world.

115.39, 12447 MWF 1-1:50, Martin

Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will explore the history of the pre-modern world. Rather than covering the history of the world, an impossible task, we will focus upon travel. Our discussions will treat the accounts of travelers in Europe, Asia, and Africa, as well as the movement of disease, the importance of infrastructure such as land and sea trade routes, and technology such as maps and compasses. Our sources will include art, architecture, and texts that travelers wrote. These will help us to understand how travelers interacted with different people and environments, while also illuminating the dynamism of the pre-modern world.

115.43, 13781 MWF 1-1:50, Van Meer

A World of Inventions. This course explores the history of our world, from the first hunter-gatherer societies until the dawn of modernity in the 16th century, using the comparative method. The theme of this global history course is invention and technology. By contextualizing key inventions of the past, e.g. prehistoric stone tools, Mesoamerican and Asian agriculture, early Egyptian and Chinese tombs, Byzantine and Islamic fashion, Medieval European and Japanese swords, and Chinese and European ocean-faring ships, we will examine how technological developments were interconnected with environmental, political, cultural, social, and economic practices.

115.52, 11588 TR 10:50-12:05, Coy

Explaining the Universe: Magic, Religion, and Society in the West. This course examines the development of Western Civilization from the Neolithic period to the eighteenth century, with a special focus on supernatural beliefs and changing conceptions of magic, religion, and science.

116.01, 10910 MWF 11-11:50, Eaves

Slavery in the Americas. In this course, we will focus on one of the most important aspects of world history—slavery in the Atlantic World from its beginnings in the late 1400 to its abolition in the 1800s. With a broad regional scope, we will look at slavery and the slave trade on both sides of the Atlantic—in Africa, North and South America, and the Caribbean. Through the course, we will gain a better understanding of the significant role slavery, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and abolitionist movements played in shaping the Atlantic world socially, culturally, politically, and economically. We will pay particular attention to themes such as slave taking, resistance, agency, labor, gender, and enslaved community and family, and the slave economy. As we live in Charleston, one of the most significant ports through which thousands of Africans forcibly entered the would-be United States, we will pay particular attention to slavery in the southern region of the US, but will gain an appreciation for how slavery looked throughout the Caribbean and Brazil.

116.02, 12442 MWF 10-10:50, Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.   

116.04, 12445 MWF 10-10:50, Crosby

Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved.   The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.05, 11049 MWF 12-12:50, Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?  

116.06, 11021 MWF 8-8:50, Van Meer

Modern Europe, the Quest for the Arctic. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the historical thread uniting all our topics is “the North Pole”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.07, 10911 MWF 11-11:50, Gigova

FROM SUBJECT TO CITIZEN: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. Through primary sources, lectures and discussions, we will explore the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over the course of the semester we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

116.08, 10912 MWF 12-12:50, Gigova

FROM SUBJECT TO CITIZEN: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. Through primary sources, lectures and discussions, we will explore the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over the course of the semester we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

116.09, 10913 TR 10:20-11:35 NORTH CAMPUS, Crosby

Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved.   The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.12, 10914 MWF 10-10:50, Eaves

Slavery in the AmericasIn this course, we will focus on one of the most important aspects of world history—slavery in the Atlantic World from its beginnings in the late 1400 to its abolition in the 1800s. With a broad regional scope, we will look at slavery and the slave trade on both sides of the Atlantic—in Africa, North and South America, and the Caribbean. Through the course, we will gain a better understanding of the significant role slavery, the trans-Atlantic slave trade, and abolitionist movements played in shaping the Atlantic world socially, culturally, politically, and economically. We will pay particular attention to themes such as slave taking, resistance, agency, labor, gender, and enslaved community and family, and the slave economy. As we live in Charleston, one of the most significant ports through which thousands of Africans forcibly entered the would-be United States, we will pay particular attention to slavery in the southern region of the US, but will gain an appreciation for how slavery looked throughout the Caribbean and Brazil.

116.14, 10915 MWF 12-12:50, Gordanier

East Asian History Through Performing Arts: From Kunqu to K-Pop and Beyond. The performing arts in premodern East Asia were more than just entertainment: music, dance, story, and acting were tools for education, social networking, diplomacy, and religious ritual, but they were also (according to authorities), dangerous vehicles for corruption, sedition, and debauchery. What makes performance so powerful even today? This course uses theater, dance, music, and other performance forms as a window on East Asian history and society from premodern times to the present day, with a particular focus on China, Korea, and Japan in the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. We will investigate the ways performing arts conveyed, transgressed, or even shaped ideas about how people ought to think and live; the audiences these performances reached; and the people who brought them to life.

116.15, 12446 MWF 11-11:50, Krajewski

Revolutions in Modern World History. The course begins with a unit on the revolutions of the late 18th and early 19th centuries (USA, France, Haiti, and Latin American Independence); the second unit will focus on the revolutions to upend established political economic orders in the first half of the 20th (Mexico, Russia, and China); and, finally, we trace the maturation of both class-based political movements and anti-imperialism in the 20th century (Vietnam's several revolutionary attempts, Algeria, Cuba, Nicaragua, and Iran). One of the goals of the class will be to ask students to think about how movements, motivations, goals, and regimes compare between revolutions in the anti-colonial context and those that occur inside of established, independent nations.

116.16, 12448 MWF 12-12:50, Krajewski

Revolutions in Modern World History. The course begins with a unit on the revolutions of the late 18th and early 19th centuries (USA, France, Haiti, and Latin American Independence); the second unit will focus on the revolutions to upend established political economic orders in the first half of the 20th (Mexico, Russia, and China); and, finally, we trace the maturation of both class-based political movements and anti-imperialism in the 20th century (Vietnam's several revolutionary attempts, Algeria, Cuba, Nicaragua, and Iran). One of the goals of the class will be to ask students to think about how movements, motivations, goals, and regimes compare between revolutions in the anti-colonial context and those that occur inside of established, independent nations.

116.17, 10916 MWF 11-11:50, Cropper

The History of the Atlantic World, Climate Change, and the Anthropocene. This course focuses on the history of the Atlantic World, Climate Change, and the Anthropocene from the fifteenth century to the present, and will consider how broad historical processes of transformation and change, from the Age of Exploration and the Industrial Revolution to the Great Acceleration and Climate Change, have catalyzed a new epoch in human and natural history: the Anthropocene. In doing so, we will consider how various populations of the Atlantic World have contributed to anthropogenic climate change, and how exponential economic growth and intensive energy use have triggered unprecedented processes of environmental change. Indeed, one of the primary objectives of this course is to reflect on what it means to be living in this new epoch of natural history and how we—as humans—have arrived at this point. By considering the challenging realities of the Anthropocene, from climate change to environmental degradation and mass extinction, students will consider Earth as a global ecosystem that is shaped by a variety of dynamic and interactive systems—both natural and anthropogenic.

116.18, 10917 MWF 1-1:50, Slater

Women, Gender, and Race in Modern History. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of women, gender, race, and sexualities in relation to the rise of Western Civilization. The focus will be on gendered liberties. Studying the various roles of women and their relationships to men provide a unique lens through which to understand the rise of Europe and the Western world.  The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage women’s role in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexualities.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint) and discussion.  You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

116.19, 10918 MWF 1-1:50, Gordanier

East Asian History Through Performing Arts: From Kunqu to K-Pop and Beyond. The performing arts in premodern East Asia were more than just entertainment: music, dance, story, and acting were tools for education, social networking, diplomacy, and religious ritual, but they were also (according to authorities), dangerous vehicles for corruption, sedition, and debauchery. What makes performance so powerful even today? This course uses theater, dance, music, and other performance forms as a window on East Asian history and society from premodern times to the present day, with a particular focus on China, Korea, and Japan in the seventeenth through twenty-first centuries. We will investigate the ways performing arts conveyed, transgressed, or even shaped ideas about how people ought to think and live; the audiences these performances reached; and the people who brought them to life.

116.20, 10919 TR 10:50-12:05, Steere-Williams

The Networked Society: Media, Technology and the Public Sphere in Modern History. This course is an introduction to modern history through the lens of studying media, communication, and technology. Today mediated messages are everywhere. We live tweet political revolutions from our phones. We watch Game of Thrones on our tablets. We listen to Spotify playlists. As “digital natives,” you need no introduction to our technologically networked world. Despite its proliferation, mediation is not new, but rather at the heart of modernity. In this class we will explore the complex and uneven project of the public sphere, from the Enlightenment to the late twentieth century. We will examine disparate communicative technologies- handbills, telegraphs, the periodical press, photographs, the radio, and television, to see the ways in which they supported and at times critiqued political and economic models of citizenship and governance. Communicative technologies, we will see, have long had the ability to bring people together and to pull them apart. This class provides critical insight necessary for navigating a connected, networked world.

116.21, 10920 TR 12:15-1:30, Steere-Williams

The Networked Society: Media, Technology and the Public Sphere in Modern History. This course is an introduction to modern history through the lens of studying media, communication, and technology. Today mediated messages are everywhere. We live tweet political revolutions from our phones. We watch Game of Thrones on our tablets. We listen to Spotify playlists. As “digital natives,” you need no introduction to our technologically networked world. Despite its proliferation, mediation is not new, but rather at the heart of modernity. In this class we will explore the complex and uneven project of the public sphere, from the Enlightenment to the late twentieth century. We will examine disparate communicative technologies- handbills, telegraphs, the periodical press, photographs, the radio, and television, to see the ways in which they supported and at times critiqued political and economic models of citizenship and governance. Communicative technologies, we will see, have long had the ability to bring people together and to pull them apart. This class provides critical insight necessary for navigating a connected, networked world.

116.22, 12503 W 6:00-8:45 PM, NORTH CAMPUS, Crout

MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD SINCE 1600: THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION. What do the material objects that are important to you tell others about who you are?  This course concentrates on the role objects (material culture) have played in defining who “we” are through studying the artifacts we leave behind such as architecture, household goods, art, foods, clothing, and style.  Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World since 1600.

116.23, 13786 MWF 1-1:50, Smith

Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.24, 10921 TR 9:25-10:40, Poole

Histories of Satan, Histories of Evil. “Those Who Consider the Devil to be a partisan of evil and angels to be the warriors of the good have accepted the demagoguery of angels. The case is clearly more complicated.” - Milan Kundera. Do you ever use the word evil? If so, for what kind of acts, experiences, people? Can you imagine that the idea of evil has a history like war or democracy? Have Americans and Europeans been obsessed with the Devil in the distant past as the embodiment of evil? Has this changed? What do you think of the idea that the notion of Satan is actually more important to many Americans than it has been in the past? Do you agree or disagree with this? What is the history of this idea and what is its meaning for the present? How will you define the idea of evil after you learn its history?

116.31, 11327 MWF 8-8:50, Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.37, 10958 MWF 11-11:50, Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?

116.38, 11387 TR 12:15-1:30, Covert

History and Memory. This course explores modern history through the lens of history and memory. We will analyze how individuals, institutions, and governments have sought to remember or tried to forget historical events, people, and artifacts in modern world history ranging from Columbus’s arrival in the Caribbean to the present. In addition to learning about such historical topics as imperialism, authoritarianism, slavery, and war, then, students will also grapple with the political and economic implications of history and how it is commemorated, represented, or erased. This course will introduce students to broad historical currents in modern history and enable them to think more critically about history as a process, rather than as a static list of names and dates.

116.39, 11396 M 5:30-8:15, Donaldson

Fight the Power: North American Labor Movements. The Industrial Revolution is often a staple of history survey courses. But what about the people who worked in the factories, dug the coal to fire industrial machines, and operated the trains that carried the new products far and wide? What about their families that made up the working-class communities that surrounded the centers of industry? This course will focus on lives of working-class people in the United States, Canada, and Mexico and their struggles for living wages, decent hours, and better living conditions over the course of the mid-19ththrough 20th centuries. 

116.40, 11786 TR 3:05-4:20, Domby

Civil War, Insurgency, and Terrorism in Modern History. This course explores modern history through an examination of armed conflict. This class will focus on the changing nature of warfare in the modern era through the lens of civil wars and insurgencies. The class will examine the differences between civil wars, wars of independence, and international conflicts to determine what makes a war a civil war. Conflicts studied will likely include The American Revolution, The American Civil War, the Philippine insurrection, the Chinese Civil War, Vietnam, Afghanistan and the War on Terror, and the Syrian Civil War.

116.41, 13498 MW 3:25-4:40, Ingram

Race and Imperialism in America. In this course we will explore efforts to both support and challenge ideas about empire by studying global conflicts, cultural revolutions, and major social movements in the U.S. and abroad between the 1890s and the present. By re-thinking topics such as western imperialism alongside Jim Crow segregation in the U.S.; international Cold War Diplomacy alongside the American Civil Rights Movement; and American proxy wars within the context of decolonization, we will re-evaluate major events in American History during Long Twentieth Century within a global context. While this class focuses on a ~125-year period, we will explore a much broader period for most of the topics we study in order to better understand the historical contexts in which they occurred.

201.01, 10532 MWF 12-12:50, Smith

United States History to 1865. The purpose of this course is to incorporate peoples’ actions into the context of early American history, beginning with Native American contact and concluding with the final shots of the Civil War.  By weaving together the social, political, economic, and environmental aspects of the American experience, this course will seek to explain how and why particular people of various backgrounds crucially shaped a nation.  In doing so, we will see how Native Americans, colonists, the enslaved, and United States citizens transformed the land and each other while developing an overall American identity.  Ultimately, we will focus on the theme of freedom and answer the following question: what has freedom meant to Americans from initial settlement until the end of the Civil War, and how have those meanings changed over time? With a driving narrative of noteworthy and ordinary people, events, and institutions, this course will (hopefully) provide you with a concise, yet diverse, understanding of this nation’s evolution.

222.01, 13371 T 5:30-8:15, Stockton

History of South Carolina. South Carolina from the colonial period to the present. Topics discussed include plantation slavery, Southern nationalism, pro-slavery ideology, the nullification crisis, the secessionist movement and the Civil War, the disintegration of slavery and the transition to a free labor economy, regional diversification and the slow process of modernization that continued throughout the 20th century. 

231.01, 10785 MWF 2-2:50, Alwine

Ancient Greece. This course is an introduction to the political, social, and cultural history of Ancient Greece. We will read both the primary sources (the Greek historians and other ancient writers) and secondary sources (our textbook and scholarly work in the field). The goal is to give students as thorough a knowledge of Ancient Greece as possible in our limited time frame.  In the course of our study of Ancient Greece, we will also learn how to pose and provide answers to a variety of questions that are of enduring significance for humanity. Topics will include (to name only a few) warfare and society, the nature of empires, clash between East and West, the proper functioning of democracy, interstate relationships, and privileged and underprivileged classes.

241.02, 12113 TR 3:05-4:20, Coy

Special Topics: Tudor-Stuart Britain. This course will explore the history of early modern Britain from the late fifteenth until the early eighteenth century, with an emphasis on political and religious history. 

250.01, 12093 MWF 11-11:50, Jestice

Special Topics: Medieval Monarchy. People often think of the European Middle Ages as an Age of Kings. That’s true enough, but it’s only the beginning of the story. Besides kings, there were emperors and popes (whose power in the high Middle Ages was very much monarchic). Besides the rare ruling queen, queens and other members of royal families usually played a significant role in governance. So did nobles, the “community of the realm” whose opinion had to be consulted on any important matter. Monarchs’ relations with urban elites were also carefully negotiated and sometimes erupted into violence. In this course, we will explore what it meant to be a medieval monarch, both the good and the bad. We will consider the theory of rule—when is it lawful to resist a king? what is the source of royal authority?—but in the context of rich case studies that will lead us to Magna Carta, assassinations, and the pomp and glory of monarchy.

261.01, 13372 MWF 1-1:50, Cropper

The Environmental History of Africa, 1850 to the Present. Africa’s diverse environments have long been associated with decline and degradation—a narrative of how Africans have consistently destroyed their pristine environments over time. To be sure, images of soil erosion, desiccation, deforestation, and famines have shaped the way the West has perceived Africa for much of the 20thand 21stcenturies. This course will consider an alternative perspective of Africa’s environments by focusing on the dynamic and complex processes of environmental change from the colonial period to the present. We will draw on historical texts, novels, and films from multiple regions on the continent to explore how Africans understood, exploited, and managed their natural environments. By adopting an African “point of view,” this course will attempt to address some of the grave misconceptions that have lead so many to believe that Africa was, and continues to be, a “Dark Continent.” Furthermore, students will be encouraged to think critically about the meaning of “environmental crisis” and how that trope has served various political and cultural projects over time. But we will also seriously consider the ways in which human beings have, from the colonial period through the present day, taxed natural resources in ways that have produced profound short and long-term consequences.

272.01, 11598 MWF 9-9:50, Cropper

Pre-Colonial Africa. This course surveys the states and societies of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century West and Central Africa in order to shed light on the various heritages of the African people who were enslaved during the principal years of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.  Our study will emphasize the enormous variation of political forms and economic systems in Africa during that time period.  We will also consider what cultural elements these societies shared (what aspects were uniquely “African”).  In each case, we will examine the ways in which involvement in a trans-Atlantic commercial network changed African societies and how they coped with the violence of the Atlantic slave trade.

283.01, 13834 MWF 10-10:50, Gordanier

History of Modern China. A study of Chinese history from 1800 to the present, emphasizing the transformation of the Confucian empire into a modern national state. Topics include imperialism, nationalism, revolution, communism and the Four Modernizations.

299.01, 10772 MWF 9-9:50, Gigova

The Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

299.02, 10870 TR 1:40-2:55, Mikati

The Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

299.03, 13347 TR 10:50-12:05, Poole

The Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

301.01, 13373 MWF 10-10:50, Slater

Colonial America, 1585-1763. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the colonial period of North America from the earliest contacts between Europeans and Native Americans to the American Revolution.  Particular attention is paid to the interaction of Indians, European and African peoples and cultures, the rise of British dominance, the internal development of the Anglo-American colonies, and the events that led to the colonial rebellion and the American Revolution.  The goal is to understand the racial, ethnic, gendered, class and regional diversity of American colonial society as well as to understand the colonial period in its own terms rather than as a prelude to United States history.  Classes will be structured with a formal lecture (usually accompanied by PowerPoint multimedia) followed by discussion of primary and secondary source readings.

310.01, 13785 TR 10:50-12:05, Domby

Monuments, Lies, and Celebrations: Historical Memory. This class will examine the field of historical memory including topics like Confederate Monuments, Original Intent, slavery on College campuses, and the Hamilton musical. Students will do their own research projects into an aspect of how Americans remember the past and write an original paper on the topic. 

350.01, 11815 TR 1:40-2:55, Poole

Special Topics: The Great War: A New World of Gods and Monsters. The Great War represented a catastrophe for people all over the globe and set the stage for a century of conflict. This class looks specifically at how the concept of horror, in film, fiction, the arts, and even as a worldview, flourished in the aftermath of 1914-1918. We will ask questions about the relationship of horror and the experience of combat, the historical meaning of the horror film (particularly in Weimar Germany), how the memory of the Great War found expression in various macabre forms, and how the conception of death altered the way that art (particularly avant-garde art) reimagined how we talk about the world. The questions we ask will include: How we can think of horror as a historical artifact? How does culture interact with major historical events? Finally, does the Great War remain with us both in the popular culture of horror and the politics of the current moment?

357.01, 13919 TR 10:50-12:05, Steere-Williams

Victorian Britain. This upper division course asks the provocative question of how Victorian Britain shaped the world and how the world shaped Victorian Britain. It covers the period of Queen Victoria’s reign in the nineteenth century, otherwise known as the “imperial” century, when Britain came to occupy a fifth of the earth’s surface. But it was not without war, tension, and dissent, both at home and abroad. The era was full of ironies: the exuberant wealth of elite foxhunting and tea drinking portrayed in recent television dramas like Downton Abbey was braced with the urban slum realities depicted in the novels of Charles Dickens. This course explores themes of industrialization, imperialism, modernization, disease, crime, and political unrest. What did it mean to be “British,” and what does the Victorian period have to tell us about Britain’s tumultuous state today?

361.01, 13374 TR 9:25-10:40, Covert

Special Topics: Mexico's Recent Past. In the United States we hear a lot about Mexico in the news and in popular culture, but most portrayals of our vast, diverse, dynamic southern neighbor are one-dimensional and lack proper historical context. This course will examine Mexico’s recent past, focusing on the 1960s through the 1980s, with the goal of developing a better understanding of Mexico in the 21st century. Readings and discussion will draw from a wealth of new scholarship and sources corresponding to the following themes: economics and development, dissent and repression, immigration and the borderlands, and international relations. Students will choose one of these themes to explore further in a research project.  

410.01, 11814 MW 2-3:15, Eaves

The Long Civil Rights Movement.

470.01, 13375 TR 9:25-10:40, Jestice

Monarchy. This capstone course will be focused on the theme of monarchy. There will be some common readings to ground students in the central issues of the topic, but the bulk of the course is an extended, mentored research project that will produce a 30-page work of original research. Students will choose a topic in consultation with the instructor—from any period and culture for which there is sufficient material. Note that the projects will be focused on issues of monarchy, rather than intended to produce biographies.