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Fall 2018 Course Offerings

Course Descriptions

103.01, 11043 MWF 8-8:50, Crosby

World History to 1500. This course covers world history from prehistory to circa 1500 CE, focusing on economic, social, political, and cultural aspects of people before the onset of western dominance and identifying major patterns and trends which characterized the world in each era.

115.01, 11147 MW 3:25-4:40, Halvorson

The History of Ancient Egypt. Learn about one of the most enduring civilizations in the ancient world which interacted with people spanning three continents, Africa, Asia, and Europe. From the Great Pyramids of Egypt to the female pharaoh, Cleopatra, the Egyptians still fascinate people today.

115.03, 10969 MWF 9-9:50, Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.05, 10971 MWF 9-9:50, Martin

Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will explore the history of the pre-modern world.  Rather than covering the history of the world, an impossible task, we will focus upon travel.  Our discussions will treat the accounts of travelers in Europe, Asia, and Africa, as well as the movement of disease, the importance of infrastructure such as land and sea trade routes, and technology such as maps and compasses. Our sources will include art, architecture, and texts that travelers wrote.  These will help us to understand how travelers interacted with different people and environments, while also illuminating the dynamism of the pre-modern world.

115.06, 10972MWF 9-9:50, Smith

A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.07, 10973 MWF 10-10:50, Smith

A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.08, 10974 MWF 12-12:50, Van Meer

A World of Inventions. This course explores the history of our world, from the first hunter-gatherer societies until the dawn of modernity in the 16th century, using the comparative method. The theme of this global history course is invention and technology. By contextualizing key inventions of the past, e.g. prehistoric stone tools, Mesoamerican and Asian agriculture, early Egyptian and Chinese tombs, Byzantine and Islamic fashion, Medieval European and Japanese swords, and Chinese and European ocean-faring ships, we will examine how technological developments were interconnected with environmental, political, cultural, social, and economic practices.

115.09, 10975 MWF 11-11:50, Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.10, 10976 MWF 11-11:50, Martin

Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will explore the history of the pre-modern world.  Rather than covering the history of the world, an impossible task, we will focus upon travel.  Our discussions will treat the accounts of travelers in Europe, Asia, and Africa, as well as the movement of disease, the importance of infrastructure such as land and sea trade routes, and technology such as maps and compasses. Our sources will include art, architecture, and texts that travelers wrote.  These will help us to understand how travelers interacted with different people and environments, while also illuminating the dynamism of the pre-modern world.

115.11, 10977 MWF 11-11:50, Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. Unifying theme: As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

115.12, 10978 MWF 12-12:50, Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. Unifying theme: As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

115.13, 10979 MWF 8-8:50, Martin

Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will explore the history of the pre-modern world.  Rather than covering the history of the world, an impossible task, we will focus upon travel.  Our discussions will treat the accounts of travelers in Europe, Asia, and Africa, as well as the movement of disease, the importance of infrastructure such as land and sea trade routes, and technology such as maps and compasses. Our sources will include art, architecture, and texts that travelers wrote.  These will help us to understand how travelers interacted with different people and environments, while also illuminating the dynamism of the pre-modern world.

115.14, 10980 MWF 12-12:50, Lary

History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in Three Empires: Ancient Greece, India, and Persia. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in the ancient world.  The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise.  While we will address many ancient philosophies and religions in this course, the primary focus will be on three case studies: the empires of ancient Greece, ancient India, and ancient Persia.  In ancient Greece, the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics through the Hellenistic thinkers will be highlighted and placed within the cultural and political context.  In ancient India, we will pay particular attention to the development of the competing yet symbiotic teachings of ancient Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism.  Finally, our study of ancient Persia will begin with the history of ancient Zoroastrianism. 

115.15, 10981 MWF 1-1:50, Lary

History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in Three Empires: Ancient Greece, India, and Persia. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in the ancient world.  The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise.  While we will address many ancient philosophies and religions in this course, the primary focus will be on three case studies: the empires of ancient Greece, ancient India, and ancient Persia.  In ancient Greece, the history of philosophy from the pre-Socratics through the Hellenistic thinkers will be highlighted and placed within the cultural and political context.  In ancient India, we will pay particular attention to the development of the competing yet symbiotic teachings of ancient Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism.  Finally, our study of ancient Persia will begin with the history of ancient Zoroastrianism. 

115.16, 10983 MW 2:00-3:15, Krajewski

Crisis and Response in the Iberian World. This course begins with the Muslim conquests of the Iberian Peninsula and ends with the final reconquest by the Catholic monarchs at the end of the fifteenth century. It will focus on ecological, biological, and environmental pressures, with particular emphasis on the Little Ice Age, the Great Famine, and the Black Death.

115.17, 10984 MW 2-3:15, Cavalli

Saints, Heretics, and Reformers in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. This course will survey the development of Christian ideas and religious practice from the medieval to the early modern periods in Europe. It asks, what historical conditions and ideas guided religious practice and contributed to the way individuals experienced spirituality? What characteristics and institutions define a good Christian community or society? and What is the relationship between the sacred and the secular? Topics include mystic and visionary experiences, tension between worldly and spiritual authority, monastic life, religious outsiders and heresy, Protestant and Catholic reform movements, witchcraft, and confessional wars of religion.

115.18, 10985 MW 2-3:15, Shumway

Africa in Premodern World History. This course will examine human history from earliest times to the fifteenth century from the perspective of the African continent and its people.  Important topics will include migration, Ancient Egypt and the spread of Islam.

115.19, 12823 MW 2-3:15, Phillips

Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.20, 10986 TR 9:25-10:40, Boucher

Imagining and Describing Distant Worlds. This course will survey the history of various societies from Antiquity to the late Middle Ages.  While the material will help you develop a basic understanding of the pre-modern world and its history, the course will focus on the following question: How did various societies at the time imagined and described regions located on their geographic periphery? As this class will show, pre-modern descriptions of distant lands often reveal more about the societies that produced them than about the places they intended to describe.  Whether they were Ancient Greek poets or Medieval Irish monks, for instance, authors injected in these descriptions the values, anxieties, and fantasies that were common in their cultures of origin. As such, these texts provide revealing insights about past societies and the only means to appreciate them is to understand them in the historical and cultural context in which they were written.

115.21, 10987 TR 10:50-12:05, Boucher

Imagining and Describing Distant Worlds. This course will survey the history of various societies from Antiquity to the late Middle Ages.  While the material will help you develop a basic understanding of the pre-modern world and its history, the course will focus on the following question: How did various societies at the time imagined and described regions located on their geographic periphery? As this class will show, pre-modern descriptions of distant lands often reveal more about the societies that produced them than about the places they intended to describe.  Whether they were Ancient Greek poets or Medieval Irish monks, for instance, authors injected in these descriptions the values, anxieties, and fantasies that were common in their cultures of origin. As such, these texts provide revealing insights about past societies and the only means to appreciate them is to understand them in the historical and cultural context in which they were written.

115.22, 10988 TR 9:25-10:40, Mikati

Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.23, 10989 TR 10:50-12:05, Piccione

History, Legend and Mythology. This course surveys the major civilizations of the ancient world through the lens of legend and mythology. Beginning with Mesopotamia and ancient Egypt, it continues through the Minoans, Greeks and Romans (up to. AD 476). It focuseson the major myths and legends of these societies, including early creation mythologies, Egyptian and Mesopotamian legends of the gods and heroes, and legendary tales from Greece and Rome. Topics include the historical foundations of many of these legends, and the extent to which later legends of the Greeks and Romans were influenced by–or adapted from–earlier myths and legends of Egypt and the East. In this manner, the course explores not only what legends and mythology reveal about these historical civilizations, but also how those societies viewed themselves.

115.24, 10990 TR 1:40-2:55, Schaffer

Premodern Piracy. This section of History 115 will focus on maritime piracy, from ancient Egypt through the early English Empire (c. 1500s). While most people are familiar with Caribbean piracy, popularized by movies such as Pirates of the Caribbean, this class will look back at the ancient roots of one of humanity's longest military threats. How did ancient empires deal with maritime threats? Were pirates always considered enemies? Did piracy and religious conflict interact? How did piracy contribute to the development of New World colonization? Find out in this class! 

115.25, 10991 TR 10:50-12:05, Mikati

Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.27, 10992 MW 3:25-4:40, Cavalli

Saints, Heretics, and Reformers in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. This course will survey the development of Christian ideas and religious practice from the medieval to the early modern periods in Europe. It asks, what historical conditions and ideas guided religious practice and contributed to the way individuals experienced spirituality? What characteristics and institutions define a good Christian community or society? and What is the relationship between the sacred and the secular? Topics include mystic and visionary experiences, tension between worldly and spiritual authority, monastic life, religious outsiders and heresy, Protestant and Catholic reform movements, witchcraft, and confessional wars of religion.

115.28, 10993 MW 2-3:15, Halvorson

The History of Ancient Egypt. Learn about one of the most enduring civilizations in the ancient world which interacted with people spanning three continents, Africa, Asia, and Europe. From the Great Pyramids of Egypt to the female pharaoh, Cleopatra, the Egyptians still fascinate people today.

115.30, 11719 TR 3:05-4:20, Schaffer

Premodern Piracy. This section of History 115 will focus on maritime piracy, from ancient Egypt through the early English Empire (c. 1500s). While most people are familiar with Caribbean piracy, popularized by movies such as Pirates of the Caribbean, this class will look back at the ancient roots of one of humanity's longest military threats. How did ancient empires deal with maritime threats? Were pirates always considered enemies? Did piracy and religious conflict interact? How did piracy contribute to the development of New World colonization? Find out in this class! 

115.31, 11558 TR 9:25-10:40, Campbell

The Heirs of Rome.  Did the Roman Empire fall?  Like many historical questions, the answer is “yes and no.”  This course will explore what happened to the territories that had been part of the Roman Empire.  In western Europe, imperial government ended, but the Germanic successor states kept much of Rome in both their political and their cultural structures.  By contrast, the eastern half of the empire survived—what modern historians call the Byzantine Empire.  But in time, part of that eastern territory was conquered by a new political entity with the rise of Islam.  The Heirs of Rome explores the political and cultural life of these three successors of ancient Rome.

115.32, 11584 TR 8:55-10:10 NORTH CAMPUS, Crosby

Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of  society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines. 

115.33, 11718 MW 3:25-4:40, Phillips

Dangerous Appetites. This course analyzes the relationship between culinary history from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to 1500. Food has played a crucial role in the creation of what we often call “globalism.” In fact, trade in rice and rum forged the first global trade networks and, along with them, helped shape the nature of western and slavery create empires of trade and sea power.We will examine how food, in different culture and at different times, has been used as a symbol of hospitality and of domination. We will look at how food shaped a variety of global culture’s understanding of itself and others. We will see how food initiated the first European drive for domination Africa, Asia and the Americans and changed, not only political arrangements, but ecosystems and disease environments as well.

115.34, 11594 M 6-8:45 pm, NORTH CAMPUS, Davis

Pre-Modern History. The theme of the course is the definition of civilization.  The time period of the course is prehistory to 1500. The primary regions of concern are Europe, Africa, the Middle East, India, and China. Types of historical topics considered include political, intellectual, economic, social, and artistic topics.  Additionally, an ongoing concern of the course is how history relates to contemporary questions and issues.

115.36, 13696 MWF 10-10:50, Halvorson

The History of Ancient Egypt. Learn about one of the most enduring civilizations in the ancient world which interacted with people spanning three continents, Africa, Asia, and Europe. From the Great Pyramids of Egypt to the female pharaoh, Cleopatra, the Egyptians still fascinate people today.

115.37, 13697 MWF 10-10:50, Halvorson

The History of Ancient Egypt. Learn about one of the most enduring civilizations in the ancient world which interacted with people spanning three continents, Africa, Asia, and Europe. From the Great Pyramids of Egypt to the female pharaoh, Cleopatra, the Egyptians still fascinate people today.

115.39, 13700 MWF 1-1:50, Martin

Travel in the Pre-Modern World. In this course, we will explore the history of the pre-modern world. Rather than covering the history of the world, an impossible task, we will focus upon travel. Our discussions will treat the accounts of travelers in Europe, Asia, and Africa, as well as the movement of disease, the importance of infrastructure such as land and sea trade routes, and technology such as maps and compasses. Our sources will include art, architecture, and texts that travelers wrote. These will help us to understand how travelers interacted with different people and environments, while also illuminating the dynamism of the pre-modern world.

115.41, 11721 TR 12:15-1:30, Campbell

The Heirs of Rome.  Did the Roman Empire fall?  Like many historical questions, the answer is “yes and no.”  This course will explore what happened to the territories that had been part of the Roman Empire.  In western Europe, imperial government ended, but the Germanic successor states kept much of Rome in both their political and their cultural structures.  By contrast, the eastern half of the empire survived—what modern historians call the Byzantine Empire.  But in time, part of that eastern territory was conquered by a new political entity with the rise of Islam.  The Heirs of Rome explores the political and cultural life of these three successors of ancient Rome.

115.52, 11791 TR 3:04-4:20, Lehman

Folktales and Legends: Interpreting Premodern History through Fiction. A community’s folktales and legends inform children about their group history as well as provide behavioral guidelines. These tales shape identity and world views. Consequently, although at least partly fictional, these stories provide the historian with a wealth of information about day-to-day behavior and beliefs usually otherwise buried in the past. Exploring a selection of five global regions—Chinese, Middle Eastern, Scandinavian, West African, and North-West American—this class will dissect a series of folktales and legends told between the 5th and 16th centuries. Examining the telling and retelling of stories like Mulan, the class will analyze premodern familial structures, gendered relationships, beliefs, and government.

116.01, 10994 MWF 8-8:50, Van Meer

Modern Europe, the Quest for the North Pole. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the historical thread uniting all our topics is “the North Pole”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.02, 13695 MWF 10-10:50, Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam. Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.03, 11908 MWF 2:00-2:50, Chen

East Asia in the World. This course will explore the long-lasting economic, political, cultural, and ideological connections between East Asian countries and how the interactions were changed in modern times, partly because of the coming of the West and partly because of the internal development of East Asian societies. The modern history of East Asia will be divided into four overlapping chronological phrases: "Pre-modern Asian internationalism" between the 16th and 18th century; "Western Imperialism" in the 19th and early 20th century; "Japanese Imperialism" in the late 19th and the first half of the 20th century; and "American Influence" in the second half of the 20th century. Some major themes for this course include international trade, imperialism, the rise of the nation-state, the perceptions (and misperceptions) between East Asians and foreigners, migration, and wars.

116.04, 13698 MW 4:00-5:15, Rizzo

War & Society.  This course is designed to familiarize you with some of the wars that have shaped societies throughout the world in the modern era. The reasons why nations go to war, the institutions built to wage war, the evolving relationship between society and the military establishment, and the way that wars are represented are some of the topics we will discuss throughout the semester. This is not a “great battles of history” course (even though tactics and battles will play a significant part in our work throughout the semester). Rather, the course will focus at every turn on the entirety of people’s complex relationship with armed conflict. 

116.05, 11148 MWF 9-9:50, Gigova

FROM SUBJECT TO CITIZEN: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. Through primary sources, lectures and discussions, we will explore the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over the course of the semester we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

116.06, 11117 MWF 10-10:50, Gigova

FROM SUBJECT TO CITIZEN: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. Through primary sources, lectures and discussions, we will explore the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over the course of the semester we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

116.07, 10995 MWF 9-9:50, Van Meer

Modern Europe, the Quest for the North Pole. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the historical thread uniting all our topics is “the North Pole”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.08, 10996 TR 1:40-2:55, Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.09, 10997 TR 10:20-11:55 NORTH CAMPUS, Crosby

Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved.   The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.10, 11786 MWF 8:00-8:50, Chen

East Asia in the World. This course will explore the long-lasting economic, political, cultural, and ideological connections between East Asian countries and how the interactions were changed in modern times, partly because of the coming of the West and partly because of the internal development of East Asian societies. The modern history of East Asia will be divided into four overlapping chronological phrases: "Pre-modern Asian internationalism" between the 16th and 18th century; "Western Imperialism" in the 19th and early 20th century; "Japanese Imperialism" in the late 19th and the first half of the 20th century; and "American Influence" in the second half of the 20th century. Some major themes for this course include international trade, imperialism, the rise of the nation-state, the perceptions (and misperceptions) between East Asians and foreigners, migration, and wars.

116.11, 12042 TR 12:15-1:30, Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.12, 10998 MWF 10-10:50, Crosby

Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. Course Description: History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved.   The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.13, 12045 TR 8-9:15, Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.14, 10999 MWF 11-11:50, Van Meer

Modern Europe, the Quest for the North Pole. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the historical thread uniting all our topics is “the North Pole”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.15, 13699 MWF 11-11:50, Krajewski

Revolutions in Modern World History. The course begins with a unit on the revolutions of the late 18th and early 19th centuries (USA, France, Haiti, and Latin American Independence); the second unit will focus on the revolutions to upend established political economic orders in the first half of the 20th (Mexico, Russia, and China); and, finally, we trace the maturation of both class-based political movements and anti-imperialism in the 20th century (Vietnam's several revolutionary attempts, Algeria, Cuba, Nicaragua, and Iran). One of the goals of the class will be to ask students to think about how movements, motivations, goals, and regimes compare between revolutions in the anti-colonial context and those that occur inside of established, independent nations.

116.16, 13701 MWF 9:00-9:50, Chen

East Asia in the World. This course will explore the long-lasting economic, political, cultural, and ideological connections between East Asian countries and how the interactions were changed in modern times, partly because of the coming of the West and partly because of the internal development of East Asian societies. The modern history of East Asia will be divided into four overlapping chronological phrases: "Pre-modern Asian internationalism" between the 16th and 18th century; "Western Imperialism" in the 19th and early 20th century; "Japanese Imperialism" in the late 19th and the first half of the 20th century; and "American Influence" in the second half of the 20th century. Some major themes for this course include international trade, imperialism, the rise of the nation-state, the perceptions (and misperceptions) between East Asians and foreigners, migration, and wars.

116.17, 11000 MWF 11-11:50, Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?  

116.18, 11001 MWF 1-1:50, Slater

Modern History. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of the complicated relationships between Enlightenment ideas of liberty and equality and the struggle for their application in Europe and America. The focus will be on gendered and racial liberties. The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage a series of historical topics/moments related to gender and race in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexualities.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint), documentaries, and discussion.  You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

116.19, 11002 MWF 12-12:50, Smith

Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.20, 11003 TR 9:25-10:40, Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.21, 11004 MWF 12-12:50, Krajewski

Revolutions in Modern World History. The course begins with a unit on the revolutions of the late 18th and early 19th centuries (USA, France, Haiti, and Latin American Independence); the second unit will focus on the revolutions to upend established political economic orders in the first half of the 20th (Mexico, Russia, and China); and, finally, we trace the maturation of both class-based political movements and anti-imperialism in the 20th century (Vietnam's several revolutionary attempts, Algeria, Cuba, Nicaragua, and Iran). One of the goals of the class will be to ask students to think about how movements, motivations, goals, and regimes compare between revolutions in the anti-colonial context and those that occur inside of established, independent nations.

116.22, 13773 W 6:00-8:45 PM, NORTH CAMPUS, Crout

MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD SINCE 1600: THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION. What do the material objects that are important to you tell others about who you are?  This course concentrates on the role objects (material culture) have played in defining who “we” are through studying the artifacts we leave behind such as architecture, household goods, art, foods, clothing, and style.  Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World since 1600.

116.24, 11005 MWF 12-12:50, Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?  

116.27, 11006 MWF 1-1:50, Smith

Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.31, 11478 TR 10:50-12:05, Poole

Histories of Satan, Histories of Evil. Do you ever use the word evil? If so, for what kind of acts, experiences, people? Can you imagine that the idea of evil has a history like war or democracy?And, did you know that Americans are, and always have been, obsessed with the Devil? What do you think of the idea that the notion of Satan is actually more important to many Americans than it has been in the past? Do you agree or disagree with this? What is the history of this idea and how did it change during the Enlightenment, influence the French Revolution, play a role in American slavery, and make an appearance in the Cold War? We will explore all these questions in HIST 116: Histories of Satan, Histories of Evil.

116.36, 11046 MWF 8-8:50, Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam. Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history. The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.

116.38, 11549 TR 12:15-1:30, Ingram

116.39, 11559 TR 5:30-6:45, Lehman

Folktales and the National Project: Reading Modern Political History in Folktales. Beginning in the 18th century and moving through the 20th century, this class explores the modern national political project through three sets of folktales: German, Japanese, and Nigerian. Looking at how governments, scholars, and local groups fought over group identity, the class will use folktales to examine the similarities and differences between the resulting idea of being German, Japanese, and Nigerian. Reading tales like Cinderella, Momotarō, and the novel Things Fall Apart, this course will do deep readings to understand culture as a political project both to instill in a majority population and for export (cultural politics). In so doing, the course briefly touches on the idea of empire, colonization, and independence. 

116.40, 12039 TR 1:40-2:55, Domby

Civil War, Insurgency, and Terrorism in Modern History. This course explores modern history through an examination of armed conflict. This class will focus on the changing nature of warfare in the modern era through the lens of civil wars and insurgencies. The class will examine the differences between civil wars, wars of independence, and international conflicts to determine what makes a war a civil war. Conflicts studied will likely include The American Revolution, The American Civil War, the Philippine insurrection, the Chinese Civil War, Vietnam, Afghanistan and the War on Terror, and the Syrian Civil War.

201.01, 10574 TR 10:50-12:05, Domby

United States to 1865. A thematic study of the culture, society and politics of the United States from colonial origins through the Civil War.

210.01, 13261 TR 3:05-4:20, Rabin

ST: Southern Jewish History. This course explores the history of Jews in the southern United States from colonial times until the present. Students will learn about Jews’ economic, social, and cultural activities, using them as a case study to explore intersections between race and religion in the region. We will explore some of the key events of southern Jewish history, with a focus on how Jews have confounded, complicated, and conformed to the region’s “peculiar” norms and categories. Students will also acquire tools of critical reading and thinking, culminating in a research project. 

216.01 13490 MWF 10:00-10:50, Eaves

African American History to 1865. This course is an exciting opportunity---take a course from the History Department’s newest assistant professor!  Dr. Shannon Eaves will be arriving at CofC this fall.  She’s an experienced teacher, a scholar who focuses on antebellum cultural history.  We don’t have details about the course yet, but you can expect good things.

231.01, 10864 TR 12:15-1:30, Gerrish

Ancient Greece. Long after the Romans conquered Greece, they remained in reverent awe of their subjects, a people with a political, religious, and cultural history more ancient than their own. Ancient Greece still captivates the modern imagination today. This course will examine Greek history from the Bronze Age into the Roman period. We will focus on the political and military history of ancient Greece, as well as its rich literary and artistic culture. This course also examines not just the history of Greece, but also its historiography: that is, how do we know what we think we know about ancient Greece? What kinds of sources did the Greeks leave us, and how do we interpret them? 

241.02, 13262 TR 9:25-10:40, Slucki

ST: The Holocaust. The Holocaust, although not the first twentieth century genocide, has become emblematic of humanity’s capacity for evil. The murder of six million Jews and five million non-Jews is widely seen as the archetypal twentieth century genocide. This course will look at the origins, implementation, and aftermath of the Holocaust. We will look at Jewish life in Europe before World War II, the rise of the Nazi state, the various methods of mass murder, and how the Holocaust took on different forms across the continent. We will also explore debates about how the Holocaust has been interpreted by historians and philosophers, and will consider thorny issues around justice and remembrance in the aftermath of the war. Students should come out of this course understanding a range of ideas about the roots and meaning of the Holocaust, its place in twentieth century history, and its ongoing relevance to make sense of the contemporary world.

241.03, 12363 TR 10:50-12:05, Slucki

ST: The Holocaust. The Holocaust, although not the first twentieth century genocide, has become emblematic of humanity’s capacity for evil. The murder of six million Jews and five million non-Jews is widely seen as the archetypal twentieth century genocide. This course will look at the origins, implementation, and aftermath of the Holocaust. We will look at Jewish life in Europe before World War II, the rise of the Nazi state, the various methods of mass murder, and how the Holocaust took on different forms across the continent. We will also explore debates about how the Holocaust has been interpreted by historians and philosophers, and will consider thorny issues around justice and remembrance in the aftermath of the war. Students should come out of this course understanding a range of ideas about the roots and meaning of the Holocaust, its place in twentieth century history, and its ongoing relevance to make sense of the contemporary world.

247.01, 13203 MWF 1-1:50, Gigova

Empire, Nation, Class in Eastern Europe. This course will introduce you to the history of Eastern Europe, the territory between modern-day Germany and Russia. In the course of the semester we will examine the historical construction of national identities, social movements, and cultural trends as the region progressed from imperial dominion (Habsburg, Romanov and Ottoman) to independent statehood. We will explore documents, novels and memoirs to understand how the ethnically and religiously diverse, yet relatively tolerant, milieu of the 19th century gave way to violent nationalism in the 1900s and Cold War division after 1945.  The rapid and multiple shifts in the region’s state boundaries, political systems and cultural identities during the last two centuries provide an intriguing case of the interaction between change and continuity in history. Approached as an intersection of local specificities and wider European trends, Eastern European history offers an excellent ground for a discussion of broader issues such as imperialism, modernization, violence and everyday life.

250.01, 13226 MWF 11-11:50, Jestice

ST: Medieval Frontiers. Scholars of the Middle Ages often focus on Europe’s “core” lands, especially France and England.  But Latin Christian medieval society expanded greatly in the second half of the Middle Ages, encountering non-Christians and different cultural worlds.  The essential question of the course is how the “medieval worldview” was transformed on the frontiers of Europe.  We will focus on four case studies: the English conquest of Ireland, the Christian reconquista of Spain, the creation of the Teutonic Order State in the Baltic, and the Crusader States of the Near East.

263.01, 13504 MW 3:25-4:20, Krajewski

Latin America Since Independence. This course focuses on the legacies of colonial rule and investigates how Latin American nation-states have dealt with challenges to their political legitimacy, economic development, and the rights of citizens. Using a combination of classroom lecture, scholarly literature, historical sources, and multimedia, we will study the long-term trends and patterns in Latin American history and dive deep into important episodes in the region’s complex history. In the last section of the course, we will look at the historical contexts of current social movements and political crises in the region including civil unrest in Venezuela and Nicaragua, inter-American immigration, and narcopolitics.

270.01, 11716 TR 12:15-1:30, Piccione

ST: Ancient Egyptian Magic and Religion. This course studies the nature of ancient Egyptian religion and its essential magical character. Taking a texts approach supplemented by archaeology and material culture, it traces the history and character of Egyptian religion and magical practices from the Archaic Period (ca. 3050 BC) up to the Persian conquest (c. 525 BC). It defines the role and nature of Egyptian so-called "magic" in its native concept (heka, 'creative power') and sets it against Greek and Roman (i.e., Europe) conceptions of sorcery and witchcraft. It explores the esoteric nature of Egyptian religious thought and the wide variety of beliefs, often contradictory to modern thinking, yet which the Egyptians were able to combine into a unified religious system. Subjects include: the nature and character of magical practice, deities, mythologies and mythopoeic thinking, cosmology and cosmogony, state religion, personal piety and funerary beliefs and customs, temples and shrines, secret passages and crypts, religious rituals, spells and incantations, mystery rites and religious initiations, and the religious function of sports and athletics. Texts include selections from: the Pyramid Texts, Coffin Texts, Book of the Dead, the magical papyri, the Books of the Netherworld and ritual inscriptions from temple walls. Final project may include a recreation of an authentic mystery/religious ritual.

270.02, 13201 TR 1:40-2:55, Mikati

ST: Women & Gender in the  Muslim Middle East. This course is an examination of the rights, roles and portrayals of women in the Muslim Middle East. It will consist of a historical survey from the rise of Islam to the contemporary period giving special emphasis to women’s role in the foundational Islamic texts and their interpretations. Beginning with the seventh century, we will study representations of gender in the Qur’an and Hadith. We will then consider how these are articulated in medieval and modern legal systems. Attention will be paid to the effects of colonialism and nationalist movements on Muslim women, and the rise of women activist movements. The class format will combine lecture and discussion of primary and secondary sources including articles, books and films.

272.01, 11802 MWF 9-9:50, Shumway

Pre-Colonial Africa. This course surveys the states and societies of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century West and Central Africa in order to shed light on the various heritages of the African people who were enslaved during the principal years of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.  Our study will emphasize the enormous variation of political forms and economic systems in Africa during that time period.  We will also consider what cultural elements these societies shared (what aspects were uniquely “African”).  In each case, we will examine the ways in which involvement in a trans-Atlantic commercial network changed African societies and how they coped with the violence of the Atlantic slave trade.

287.01, 13503 MWF 12:00-12:50, Chen

History of Modern Japan. 

291.01, 13863 M 5:30-8:15, Steere-Williams

Disease, Medicine, and History. This course investigates the changing meanings and entanglements of medical science, public health, and medical practice from the 18th century. We will examine ideas about the body and disease, the changing role and image of medicine in American and European life. Key themes we will examine include alternative medicine, the growth of medicine’s cultural authority, medical professionalization, the rise of public health, hospital care, and imperial and colonial medicine. We will probe these issues through the lenses of class, race, gender, age, lifestyle, and place in terms of health. Though the focus of the class is on the western medicine, throughout the course we will be making transnational and global comparisons. Your overall assessment in this class depends on your class participation and writing. You will work to sharpen your verbal and argumentative skills in frequent class discussions, and your writing skills through the formal study of some practical problems of expository writing and by revising essays that you write on topics raised in our historical discussion.

299.01, 10850 MW 2-3:15, Jestice

Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

299.02, 10951 TR 1:40-2:55, Lehman

Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

320.01, 13225 T 6-8:45 pm, Stockton

Charleston Architechture. This course is a topical study of the architecture of Charleston and the Lowcountry of South Carolina, from the Colonial period to the early years of the twenty-first century. The European, Caribbean and West African roots of Charleston architecture are explored. Architectural periods and styles, building types, town planning, Colonial fortifications, landscape architecture, and historic preservation are explored.

350.01, 12108 TR 9:25-10:40, Poole

ST: World War One and the Roots of Modern Horror. Examines the beginnings of horror film and fiction in relation to the phenomenon of shell shock, the medical history of the Great War, and the experience of combat memory and trauma. We will read soldier’s memoir and examine movements in art such as Dada and surrealism that emerged during war and its aftermath to understand the beginnings of twentieth century horror. The work of veterans who directed, photographed, or scripted the century’s first horror films will receive special attention, including Abel Gance, Fritz Lang, F.W. Murnau, and James Whale.

410.01, 12107 TR 9:25-10:40, Ingram

Research Seminar in U.S. History. This is the capstone research seminar for history majors. Your primary objective in this course is to produce an original and carefully researched 25-page paper. Assignments related to these papers will be due throughout the semester, and during the last third of the semester regular class meetings will be replaced by short one-on-one meetings with the instructor in order to give you the time you need to conduct research and work on your papers. The broad theme of this class is post-Civil War social and political history, and course readings will emphasize the history of crime and punishment in the modern U.S. 

441.01, 13199 TR 10:50-12:05, Coy

Research Seminar: Witch-Hunting in Early Modern Europe. In this seminar advanced undergraduate students will conduct independent and original research projects focusing on the history of witch-hunting in early modern Europe.