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Fall 2017 Course Offerings

Course Descriptions

103.01, 11170 MWF 8-8:50  Crosby

World History to 1500. This course covers world history from prehistory to circa 1500 CE, focusing on economic, social, political, and cultural aspects of people before the onset of western dominance and identifying major patterns and trends which characterized the world in each era.

115.01, 11288 MWF 8-8:50  Lary

History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in world history, from prehistory to roughly 1450 C.E. The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise. Some of the key philosophies and religions we will examine are: Judaism, Hinduism, Pre-Socratic Philosophies, Christianity, Platonism, Buddhism and Islam.

115.02, 11080 MWF 9-9:50  Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.03, 11081 MWF 9-9:50  Crosby

Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of  society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines. 

115.04, 11082 TR 8-9:15  TBA

115.05, 11083 MWF 10-10:50  Lary

History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in world history, from prehistory to roughly 1450 C.E. The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise. Some of the key philosophies and religions we will examine are: Judaism, Hinduism, Pre-Socratic Philosophies, Christianity, Platonism, Buddhism and Islam.

115.06,11084 MWF 10-10:50  Phillips

Serpents, Demons, and Divas in Western Civilization. This course analyzes the relationship between religion and gender from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to the early modern European period.  We will see how both religious conceptions of the universe and gendered conceptions of the human person shaped one another and structured a variety of societies across time.  How did religion shape the idea of manhood and womanhood?  Are religious myths primarily responsible for the oppression of women and sexual minorities or are other factors more crucial?  Students will examine primary sources ranging from court cases involving adultery in classical Greece to documents related to the witch trials of early modern Europe to answer these questions. 

115.07, 11085 MWF 11-11:50  Lary

History of Philosophical and Religious Ideas in the Ancient World. In this course, we will trace the evolution of key philosophical and religious ideas in world history, from prehistory to roughly 1450 C.E. The ideas will be treated historically and comparatively, and within the contexts out of which they arise. Some of the key philosophies and religions we will examine are: Judaism, Hinduism, Pre-Socratic Philosophies, Christianity, Platonism, Buddhism and Islam.

115.08,11086 MWF 11-11:50  Phillips

Serpents, Demons, and Divas in Western Civilization. This course analyzes the relationship between religion and gender from the earliest Mesopotamian societies to the early modern European period.  We will see how both religious conceptions of the universe and gendered conceptions of the human person shaped one another and structured a variety of societies across time.  How did religion shape the idea of manhood and womanhood?  Are religious myths primarily responsible for the oppression of women and sexual minorities or are other factors more crucial?  Students will examine primary sources ranging from court cases involving adultery in classical Greece to documents related to the witch trials of early modern Europe to answer these questions. 

115.09, 11087 MWF 12-12:50  Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.10, 11088 MWF 12-12:50  Smith

A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.11, 11089 MWF 12-12:50  Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. Unifying theme: As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

115.12, 11090 MWF 1-1:50  Crout

THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTION”: MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD TO 1700. What three things that you own do you prize most highly? What does each one tell us about you? This course on “Material History” studies the role that objects (architecture, household items, foods, clothing, sports-related goods, “treasures”) have played in defining western world societies and their values. Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World to 1700.

115.13, 11091 MWF 1-1:50  Smith

A Tale of Two Seas: Pre-Modern Development of Trade and Culture in the Mediterranean and South China Seas. Using in the Mediterranean and South China Seas as geographical scopes, this course will follow the development of trade, culture, and environmental change from antiquity to approximately 1500 CE. As part of this scope, we will discuss cross-cultural interactions through trade and commerce, examining the movement of goods, ideas, and trends that help explain the transition of the Eastern Hemisphere from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; and empire. In essence, world history is a lesson in scale, and for our purposes the year 1500 provides a convenient point to switch from regional histories to a global history.

115.14, 11092 MW 3:25-4:40  Cavalli

Sex and the Body in the Premodern West. This course is an introduction to the history of gender and sexuality from the ancient to the early modern period in Europe. It explores political, religious, intellectual, social, cultural, and medical influences on the organization and regulation of ideas about the sexed body. It considers topics such as witchcraft, marriage and courtship, holy virginity and mysticism, widowhood, prostitution, and the way ideas about gender and sexuality organized institutions and communities. It asks the questions: what is the relationship between gender, sexuality, and understandings of the body? How have claims about gender and sexuality fueled religious, political, social, and scientific debate? What are the roles of religion, the state, and the family in shaping ideas about femininity and masculinity?

115.15, 11093 MWF 12-12:50  Halvorson

The Ancient World and Religion. A historical survey of the main currents of political, social, religious and intellectual activity from the earliest civilizations to 700 C.E.  The major civilizations of the ancient world are considered and compared with an emphasis on religious views.

115.16, 11096 MW 2-3:25  Cavalli

Sex and the Body in the Premodern West. This course is an introduction to the history of gender and sexuality from the ancient to the early modern period in Europe. It explores political, religious, intellectual, social, cultural, and medical influences on the organization and regulation of ideas about the sexed body. It considers topics such as witchcraft, marriage and courtship, holy virginity and mysticism, widowhood, prostitution, and the way ideas about gender and sexuality organized institutions and communities. It asks the questions: what is the relationship between gender, sexuality, and understandings of the body? How have claims about gender and sexuality fueled religious, political, social, and scientific debate? What are the roles of religion, the state, and the family in shaping ideas about femininity and masculinity?

115.17, 11097 MW 3:25-4:40  Halvorson

The Ancient World and Religion. A historical survey of the main currents of political, social, religious and intellectual activity from the earliest civilizations to 700 C.E.  The major civilizations of the ancient world are considered and compared with an emphasis on religious views.

115.18, 11098 MW 2-3:25  Halvorson

The Ancient World and Religion. A historical survey of the main currents of political, social, religious and intellectual activity from the earliest civilizations to 700 C.E.  The major civilizations of the ancient world are considered and compared with an emphasis on religious views.

115.20, 11099 MWF 11-11:50  Halvorson

The Ancient World and Religion. A historical survey of the main currents of political, social, religious and intellectual activity from the earliest civilizations to 700 C.E.  The major civilizations of the ancient world are considered and compared with an emphasis on religious views.

115.21, 11100 TR 9:25-10:40  Mikati

Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.22, 11101 TR 9:25-10:40  Boucher

Imagining and Describing Distant Worlds. This course will survey the history of various societies from Antiquity to 1492.  While the material will help you develop a basic understanding of the pre-modern world and its history, the course will focus on the following question: How did various societies at the time imagine and describe regions located on their geographic periphery? As this class will show, pre-modern descriptions of distant lands often reveal more about the societies that produced them than about the places they intended to describe.  Whether they were Ancient Greek poets or Medieval Irish monks, for instance, authors injected in these descriptions the values, anxieties, and fantasies that were common in their cultures of origin. As such, these texts provide revealing insights about past societies and the only means to appreciate them is to understand them in the historical and cultural context in which they were written.

115.23, 11102 TR 10:50-12:05  Mikati

Intertwined Histories: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. This course presents an historical survey of pre-modern civilizations and cultures through a study of the role played by religion in the rise and shaping of cultures and societies. The primary focus will be on the historical environment and central traditions of three of the main world religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam and their near eastern environment from their inception to circa 1500 C.E.

115.24, 11103 TR 10:50-12:05  Boucher

Imagining and Describing Distant Worlds. This course will survey the history of various societies from Antiquity to 1492.  While the material will help you develop a basic understanding of the pre-modern world and its history, the course will focus on the following question: How did various societies at the time imagine and describe regions located on their geographic periphery? As this class will show, pre-modern descriptions of distant lands often reveal more about the societies that produced them than about the places they intended to describe.  Whether they were Ancient Greek poets or Medieval Irish monks, for instance, authors injected in these descriptions the values, anxieties, and fantasies that were common in their cultures of origin. As such, these texts provide revealing insights about past societies and the only means to appreciate them is to understand them in the historical and cultural context in which they were written.

115.25,11104 TR 10:50-12:05  Piccione

World History through Hollywood Film. This course provides a survey of selected civilizations in world history from 3,000BC to 1300 AD. It focuses on deconstructing mythologies, false perceptions and popular misconceptions about those civilizations by examining popular Hollywood films and foreign cinematic spectacles. Students will study specific historical issues, view ten (10) films and analyze discrepancies between fact and fiction. They will also consider the efficacy and value of historiophoty or filmic history, an emerging field of historiography that advocates fictionalized historical films to recreate and understand historical processes. The course will study the strengths and limitations of film entertainment as a medium of historical expression. Hence, students will understand to what extent historical films might or might not portray an accurate view of the past, as well as how history itself--in film and elsewhere--is often distorted for a variety of reasons, including: dramatic license, to propagandize particular interpretations, advocate change, as well as to accommodate society's needs to sanitize and/or mythologize its (or another's) past, or else to indict or criminalize it.

115.27, 11105 TR 12:15-1:30  Poole

Monsters: Ancient Stories and Modern Echoes. What is a monster? Premodern people mediated their understanding of history primarily through the telling of stories, many of them stories of monsters. This class will examine several societies in global history before about 1600 CE . These will include the early Near East, Classical Greece and Mediterranean antiquity, medieval Europe, and selected histories in early modern Europe, the Middle East, China and India We will see what their stories about monsters tell us concerning their conception of history, religion, social order, gender and meaning. We won’t only just look at he distant past but examine how comics, movies, and modern novels recycle or re-imagine these ancient ideas about creatures of wonder and terror.

115.28, 11106 TR 1:40-2:55  Coy

Explaining the Universe: Magic, Religion, and Society in the West. This course examines the development of Western Civilization from the Neolithic period to the eighteenth century, with a special focus on supernatural beliefs and changing conceptions of magic, religion, and science.

115.30, 12108 TR 3:05-4:20  Lehman

Premodern Travel and Intercultural Contact. In this course students will explore travel in the premodern world between the 5th and 16th centuries. Through a selection of maps, travel narratives, and stories from the Mediterranean, the Indian subcontinent, and East Asia, students will analyze diverse conceptions of the globe in terms of both place and people. Students will use document details to engage perceptions of otherness and acceptance in terms of belief, gender, and state formation as well as socio-economic concerns. Tackling those identity points, students are asked to consider changing ideas of otherness and consider the impact of travel.

115.31, 11799 TR 3:05-4:20  Coy

Explaining the Universe: Magic, Religion, and Society in the West. This course examines the development of Western Civilization from the Neolithic period to the eighteenth century, with a special focus on supernatural beliefs and changing conceptions of magic, religion, and science.

115.32, 11836 TR 8:55-10:10  Crosby

Development of Society and Ruling Classes in Antiquity. History 115 is designed to help students gain a better understanding of world civilization from antiquity to early middle ages. We will examine many topics which directly shaped western and world history, including art, the development of written language, impact of military conflicts, philosophical thoughts, impact of religion upon western society, territorial discoveries, and numerous attempts of societies at extending their cultural and political hegemony. Particular emphasis will be focused on the study of the evolution of  society and the monarchy through the earliest forms of ruling systems, the culture, customs, and governing practices- from the development of the first city-states ruled by chieftains and religious deities, Pharaohs, Caesars, and kings and queens. Some examples of studies will be the Kingdom of Israel, the Egyptians, the Greeks, the Romans, and the Franks, with meticulous attention focused on important rulers, the good, the bad and the insane, along with the evolution of the ruling caste/monarchy as a historical phenomena. Attention will also be paid to the emergence of an elite group of rulers, the treatment of women of all social castes, and patriarchal lines. 

115.33, 12107 TR 1:40-2:55  Shumway

Africa in Premodern World History. This course will examine human history from earliest times to the fifteenth century from the perspective of the African continent and its people. Important topics will include migration, Ancient Egypt and the spread of Islam.

115.34, 11847 M 6-8:45pm (NORTH CAMPUS)  Davis

Pre-Modern History. The theme of the course is the definition of civilization. The time period of the course is prehistory to 1500. The primary regions of concern are Europe, Africa, the Middle East, India, and China. Types of historical topics considered include political, intellectual, economic, social, and artistic topics. Additionally, an ongoing concern of the course is how history relates to contemporary questions and issues.

115.35, 11848 MW 3:25-4:40  Lehman

Folktales and Legends: Interpreting Premodern History through Fiction. A community’s folktales and legends inform children about their group history as well as provide behavioral guidelines. These tales shape identity and world views. Consequently, although at least partly fictional, these stories provide the historian with a wealth of information about day-to-day behavior and beliefs otherwise buried in the past. Exploring a selection of five global regions—Chinese, West African, Turkic, Scandinavian, and North-West American—this class will dissect a series of folktales and legends told between the 5th and 16th centuries. Examining the telling and retelling of stories like Mulan, the class will analyze premodern familial structures, gendered relationships, beliefs, and government.

115.38, 12109 TR 9:25-10:40  Shumway

Africa in Premodern World History. This course will examine human history from earliest times to the fifteenth century from the perspective of the African continent and its people. Important topics will include migration, Ancient Egypt and the spread of Islam.

115.41, 12110 TR 12:15-1:30  TBA

115.42, 12200 MW 5:30-6:45  Lehman

Folktales and Legends: Interpreting Premodern History through Fiction. A community’s folktales and legends inform children about their group history as well as provide behavioral guidelines. These tales shape identity and world views. Consequently, although at least partly fictional, these stories provide the historian with a wealth of information about day-to-day behavior and beliefs otherwise buried in the past. Exploring a selection of five global regions—Chinese, West African, Turkic, Scandinavian, and North-West American—this class will dissect a series of folktales and legends told between the 5th and 16th centuries. Examining the telling and retelling of stories like Mulan, the class will analyze premodern familial structures, gendered relationships, beliefs, and government.

115.51, 11648 TR 8-9:15  TBA

115.52, 12214 MW 2-3:15  Vincent

Athens or Jerusalem? Reason and Revelation in the Western Tradition. An introduction to the foundations of Western Civilization from its Near Eastern origins to 1500, with an emphasis on the intellectual and cultural attributes that define our civilization. Unifying theme: As western man has sought to understand and interpret his life and universe, two major intellectual methodologies have emerged, one based on the use of reason, the other on the belief in guiding spiritual forces. Sometimes in conflict, sometimes existing harmoniously, they have played a formative role in the development of western civilization. While this course will range widely, special attention will be paid to the intellectual and wisdom traditions of each cultural group we study and how those traditions became part of our own intellectual environment.

115.53, 12536 TR 1:40-2:55  Lehman

Premodern Travel and Intercultural Contact. In this course students will explore travel in the premodern world between the 5th and 16th centuries. Through a selection of maps, travel narratives, and stories from the Mediterranean, the Indian subcontinent, and East Asia, students will analyze diverse conceptions of the globe in terms of both place and people. Students will use document details to engage perceptions of otherness and acceptance in terms of belief, gender, and state formation as well as socio-economic concerns. Tackling those identity points, students are asked to consider changing ideas of otherness and consider the impact of travel.

116.01, 11107 MWF 8-8:50  Van Meer

Inventing Modern Europe, the Quest for the North Pole. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of the European Union and NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the red thread uniting all our topics is “the North Pole”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.02, 11108 MWF 9-9:50  TBA

116.03, 12476 MWF 9-9:50  Van Meer

Inventing Modern Europe, the Quest for the North Pole. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of the European Union and NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the red thread uniting all our topics is “the North Pole”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.04, 11289 MWF 10-10:50  TBA

116.05, 11290 MWF 10-10:50  Smith

Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.06, 11255 MWF 11-11:50  Donaldson

Sing for Freedom. Music has been a ubiquitous feature in protest movements of the 19th through 20th centuries. Through song, protestors have been able to express their grievances and sustain their morale in their struggles for social, cultural, political, and economic change. Music, therefore, is an important historical text that provides access to understanding the circumstances that gave rise to protest movements and insight into the motivations of activist historical actors. In this course we will examine the history of protest movements in the United States and around the world through the songs that activists created, adapted, and shared among each other and across national borders. 

116.07, 11109 MWF 10-10:50  Crout

MATERIAL CULTURE IN THE WESTERN WORLD SINCE 1600: THE OBJECTS OF OUR AFFECTIONWhat do the material objects that are important to you tell others about who you are?  This course concentrates on the role objects (material culture) have played in defining who “we” are through studying the artifacts we leave behind such as architecture, household goods, art, foods, clothing, and style.  Studying such objects helps our understanding and appreciation of political, social, cultural, and intellectual activity in the Western World since 1600.

116.08, 11110 MWF 1-1:50  Slater

Modern History. Over the course of the semester we as a class will be discussing the role of women, gender, and sexuality in relation to the rise of Western Civilization.  Studying the various roles of women and their relationships to men provide a unique lens through which to understand the rise of Europe and the Western world.  The breadth of this course prohibits depth in all areas, but we will specifically engage women’s role in politics, society, culture, the arts, and war as well as the history of modern sexuality.  You will be expected to engage a variety of works and ideas, contributing your own ideas and observations.  This course will be a combination of lecture (PowerPoint) and discussion. You will be expected to have read the course material before attending class.

116.09, 11111 TR 10:20-11:35  Crosby

Monarchs and Revolutions in Modern Europe. Course Description: History 116 will adopt a traditional approach to the study of Modern European history by examining different revolutions and the monarchs that were attributed to them- The English Revolution, Glorious Revolution, French Revolution to just name a few.  The course will examine the institution of the monarchy as a historical phenomenon, with particular focus paid to individual rulers who were involved.   The course will explore events that shaped the history of the continent and the world, as well as feature the many colorful and controversial figure heads of this time period. This course will also delve into the many facets of this institution-the culture, politics, evolving role of the monarchial system, crises, scandalous behavior, family feuds, powerful queens, warfare, upheavals, coups, and the absurd incompetence of those who have worn the crown.

116.10, 12203 TR 3:05-4:20  Delay

Modern European Identities. This course explores ideas, events, and people in modern Europe (c. 1750-2000). We will examine the social, economic, intellectual, political, and cultural developments that have shaped European society over the past few hundred years; among the topics we will study are industrialization and work, culture and the development of “modernity,” imperialism, nationalism, fascism, communism, family life, revolution and war, sexuality, and gender. We will focus particularly on issues of conflict; European identities; and race, gender, and sexuality.

116.11, 12817 M 5:30-8:15pm  Domby

Civil War, Insurgency, and Terrorism in Modern History. This course explores modern history through an examination of armed conflict. This class will focus on the changing nature of warfare in the modern era through the lens of civil wars and insurgencies. The class will examine the differences between civil wars, wars of independence, and international conflicts to determine what makes a war a civil war. Conflicts studied will likely include The American Revolution, The American Civil War, the Philippine insurrection, the Chinese Civil War, Vietnam, Afghanistan and the War on Terror, and the Syrian Civil War.

116.12, 11112 MWF 12-12:50  Gigova

From Subject to Citizen: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. In particular, we will think about the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over several weeks we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? Does great awareness of this past alter your own view of what it means to be citizen today? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

116.13, 12825 W 4-6:45pm  Domby

Civil War, Insurgency, and Terrorism in Modern History. This course explores modern history through an examination of armed conflict. This class will focus on the changing nature of warfare in the modern era through the lens of civil wars and insurgencies. The class will examine the differences between civil wars, wars of independence, and international conflicts to determine what makes a war a civil war. Conflicts studied will likely include The American Revolution, The American Civil War, the Philippine insurrection, the Chinese Civil War, Vietnam, Afghanistan and the War on Terror, and the Syrian Civil War.

116.14, 11113 MWF 1-1:50  Gigova

From Subject to Citizen: Individual and State in Modern Europe. This course seeks a conversation about where we are as a society and how we got here. In particular, we will think about the rights and duties of Westerners (for our purposes, Europeans) as they changed from subjects to citizens of their countries. Over several weeks we will explore the emergence and the changes in the meaning of citizenship. In the process we will ask: How have European society and state evolved over time? How has the relationship of individuals to the state changed in response? Does great awareness of this past alter your own view of what it means to be citizen today? While our focus will be on Europe, we want to continually ask about the impact and consequences of its history on other parts of the world, including the United States.

116.17, 11114 MW 2-3:15  Lary

Ideologies in the Modern World. A close examination of the influence of ideologies frames this history of the modern world. Our starting point will be the French Revolution, beginning in 1789, as it unleashed dreams of fraternity, liberty and equality. Next, we will examine 19th century ideologies such as liberalism, nationalism, and socialism and their relationship to the unique economic, cultural and political contexts of that time. Lastly, we will study key 20th century ideologies such as communism and fascism, as well as more recent ideologies such as pan-Africanism and political Islam.  Because this is a modern global history course, our focus is not on American history.  The countries we will study in most detail are: former Belgian Congo, former Czechoslovakia, France, Germany, India and Pakistan, Iran, Israel and the Palestinian territories, Italy, Kenya, Russia, and former Yugoslavia.  

116.18, 11115 MWF 12-12:50  Van Meer

Inventing Modern Europe, the Quest for the North Pole. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of the European Union and NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the red thread uniting all our topics is “the North Pole”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.19, 11116 MWF 1-1:50  Van Meer

Inventing Modern Europe, the Quest for the North Pole. This course investigates the history of “Modern Europe” and its relationship to “the wider world.” We start in the Renaissance (ca. 1450) when Europeans set out to dominate the world; we follow Europe’s contested history across two world wars, through the Cold War, ending our examinations in the midst of today’s critical debates about the future of the European Union and NATO. To gain a better understanding of how that history is relevant to our lives today, the red thread uniting all our topics is “the North Pole”; it is the one place in the world that has been the subject of competition and conquest, by Europeans, Americans, and Russians alike, from the 1490s until today.

116.20, 11117 MW 2-3:15  Rizzo

War & Society.  This course is designed to familiarize you with some of the wars that have shaped societies throughout the world in the modern era. The reasons why nations go to war, the institutions built to wage war, the evolving relationship between society and the military establishment, and the way that wars are represented are some of the topics we will discuss throughout the semester. This is not a “great battles of history” course (even though tactics and battles will play a significant part in our work throughout the semester). Rather, the course will focus at every turn on the entirety of people’s complex relationship with armed conflict. 

116.21, 11118 MW 2-3:15  Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?  

116.24, 11119 MW 3:25-4:40  Phillips

Industrial Revolutions: From Steam to the Atomic Age. This course will trace how technology changed the world between the Industrial Revolution and the end of the 20th century in Europe and the United States.  How did inventions ranging from the steam engine to the cash register to the internet change people’s lives? What effect did these changes have on different groups, such as women and immigrants? How did they change gender roles? How did they change foreign policy and warfare? How did technology become a source of anxiety in the 20th century?  

116.25, 11120 TR 12:15-1:30  TBA

116.26, 11121 TR 9:25-10:40  TBA

116.27, 11122 TR 9:25-10:40  Steere-Williams

Epidemics and Revolutions. The recent global epidemic crisis of Ebola provides a backdrop for the fascinating historical questions we will ask in this course, of how the social experience and cultural understanding of disease have shaped modern global history. We will explore how both chronic and infectious diseases have played a fundamental role in the development of modern modes of governance, public health, modern technologies, and a global economy. We will also examine how disease illuminates social attitudes about class, race, and colonialism in the period from the Enlightenment to the present. Using diverse examples such as cholera outbreaks in Europe, bubonic plague in India, syphilis in Africa, yellow fever in North America and the Caribbean, and HIV/AIDS across the globe, this course demonstrates that the historical analysis of disease is integral to understanding both “modernity” and “globalization”.

116.28, 11785 TR 8-9:15  TBA

116.30, 11123 TR 12:15-1:30  TBA

116.31, 11688 TR 8-9:15  Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.34, 11124 TR 12:15-1:30  TBA

116.36, 11173 TR 12:15-1:30  Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.37, 11174 TR 1:40-2:55   Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

116.38, 11786 MWF 9-9:50  Smith

Culture, Commodities, and Contours: A Survey of World History from 1500 to the Modern Era. This course is intended as an introduction to world history from approximately the year 1500 to the present, seen through the lens of evolving cultures, demand for commodities, and environmental transformations. Instead of the accumulation of facts and details, the goal is to identify and explore key trends and themes that help explain the transition of the globe from a collection of relatively isolated regions to an interconnected world system. This course will emphasize how external connections, plus internal motivations, transformed global changes over time. The major themes for this course are: regional & global cross-cultural encounters; environmental & technological exchanges; industrialization; imperialism; and national & transnational identities.

116.39, 11800 W 6-8:45pm (NORTH CAMPUS)  Davis

Modern History. The theme of the course is the advance of liberty. The time period of the course is 1750 to 1850 and beyond. The regions of concern are Europe, the United States, Canada, and Latin America. Types of historical topics considered include political, intellectual, economic, social, and artistic topics. Additionally, an ongoing concern of the course is how history relates to contemporary questions and issues.

116.40, 12808 TR 4-5:15pm  Livingston

Modern History. History 116 is the second of two entry level history courses offered by the College of Charleston. The time period covered is approximately 500 years from 1500 to the present. As a survey course we will cover selected topics in the major civilized areas of the world.  The material in this course includes the Age of Exploration and the Discovery of New Worlds, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, both the American and French Revolutions, the ‘Isms’ (Romanticism, Nationalism, Liberalism, Socialism, Darwinism and Communism), the Industrial Revolution, Imperialism and the Western World, the World Wars (I & II), the Cold War and the late 20th and early 21st Centuries and the developing nations in Latin America and Africa, as well as China and India.  Last, but not least the revolution in technology – good or bad?

201.01, 10642 MWF 10-10:50  Powers

United States to 1865. A general and thematic study of the culture, society and politics of the United States from the colonial era until the Civil War. The impact of the English background, North American settlement patterns, the American Revolution and its consequences, antebellum reform, territorial expansion and the causes of the Civil War are given special attention.

211.01, 11685 MWF 12-12:50  Donaldson

American Urban History. A survey of urban development from nineteenth century to the present. This course examines urbanization as a city-building process and its impact on American social, political and economic life.

216.01, 10643 MWF 12-12:50  Powers

African American History to 1865. Beginning with the African background this course surveys the experience of African Americans from the colonial era through the Civil War.  The Atlantic slave trade, the slave experience, free blacks, abolitionism and the social and political implications of the Civil War for African Americans are some subjects given special attention.  

226.01, 12746 TR 3:05-4:20  Poole

American Monsters. The class explores American history from the colonial period to the present. We will approach this survey by examining how narratives of monstrosity and horror have intersected with important historical events, cultural ideologies and moral panics in the American historical experience. After some theoretical grounding in the idea of monstrosity as a marker of cultural history, we will look at specific historical periods to examine how horror narratives intertwined with significant events and ideas in folk belief, legend, political discourse, gender constructions, religion and pop culture.

231.01, 10968 MWF 1-1:50  Alwine

Ancient Greece. This course is an introduction to the political, social, and cultural history of Ancient Greece. We will read both the primary sources (the Greek historians and other ancient writers) and secondary sources (our textbook and scholarly work in the field). The goal is to give students as thorough a knowledge of Ancient Greece as possible in our limited time frame.  In the course of our study of Ancient Greece, we will also learn how to pose and provide answers to a variety of questions that are of enduring significance for humanity. Topics will include (to name only a few) warfare and society, the nature of empires, clash between East and West, the proper functioning of democracy, interstate relationships, and privileged and underprivileged classes.

263.01, 13254 TR 9:25-10:40  Covert

Latin America since Independence. This course focuses on the history of Latin America from the wars of independence to the present.  Because of the large geographical and chronological scope, this course will not concentrate solely on specific events and leaders. Rather, it will take a comparative approach with an emphasis on the broader political, economic, and cultural themes that connect or differentiate particular national histories. Ultimately this course seeks to provide students with a better understanding of Latin America’s historical trajectory and, as a result, a better understanding of the integral role Latin America plays in the world today. This is a sustainability-related course.

270.01, 12105 MWF 11-11:50  Jestice

ST: Medieval England. From King Arthur (did he really exist?) through the late Middle Ages (did they really kill King Edward II that way??), this course explores England’s unique path in the Middle Ages, a past that has shaped England’s relationship with the rest of its island, Europe, and the world up to the present.  The three major conquests that helped forge English identity will be a point of particular interest, and we will examine the political, military, cultural, and social consequences of each.  The period covered by this class is roughly AD 400-1485, but of course some eras will be examined in much more detail than others.

272.01, 12235 TR 10:50-12:05  Shumway

Pre-Colonial Africa. This course surveys the states and societies of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century West and Central Africa in order to shed light on the various heritages of the African people who were enslaved during the principal years of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.  Our study will emphasize the enormous variation of political forms and economic systems in Africa during that time period.  We will also consider what cultural elements these societies shared (what aspects were uniquely “African”).  In each case, we will examine the ways in which involvement in a trans-Atlantic commercial network changed African societies and how they coped with the violence of the Atlantic slave trade.

276.01, 13256 TR 1:40-2:55  Mikati

291.01, 11905 TR 12:15-1:30  Steere-Williams

Disease, Medicine, and History. This course investigates the changing meanings and entanglements of medical science, public health, and medical practice from the 18th century. We will examine ideas about the body and disease, the changing role and image of medicine in American and European life. Key themes we will examine include alternative medicine, the growth of medicine’s cultural authority, medical professionalization, the rise of public health, hospital care, and imperial and colonial medicine. We will probe these issues through the lenses of class, race, gender, age, lifestyle, and place in terms of health. Though the focus of the class is on the western medicine, throughout the course we will be making transnational and global comparisons. Your overall assessment in this class depends on your class participation and writing. You will work to sharpen your verbal and argumentative skills in frequent class discussions, and your writing skills through the formal study of some practical problems of expository writing and by revising essays that you write on topics raised in our historical discussion.

293.01, 12619 MW 2-3:15  Donaldson

Intro into Public History. This course is designed to explore the history, theory, and current issues of public history practice in the United States. As an interdisciplinary field, public history incorporates methodologies from various academic disciplines. This course will provide an introduction to different forms of public history, particularly by examining the theoretical undepinnings and methodologies that have shaped each one. We will also pay close attention to social and ethical issues particular to this field, many of which stem from the demands of engaging a public audience.

299.01, 10953 MW 2-3:15  Olejniczak

Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

299.02, 11056 TR 12:15-1:30 Covert

Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

299.03, 13262 TR 1:40-2:55  Covert

Historian's Craft. This is a topics-based course in which students deal with different types of historical materials and techniques to develop skills in research, writing, critical thinking, and oral presentation, focused on the discipline of history. Topics will vary and will selected by the professor.

304.01, 13253 MW 2-3:15  Domby

Civil War and Reconstruction, 1845-1877. The growth of sectional antagonisms, the causes of the war, the politicians and military leadership during the war and the Reconstruction period. Prerequisites: EITHER HIST 115-116 OR any other combination of courses that satisfies the general education history requirement.

323.01, 13261 T 6-8:45pm  Stockton

Society and Culture of Early Charleston. Topics in American social history studied through a focus on society and culture in 18th- and early 19th-century Charleston. Topics include immigrant groups, demography, mortality, economic and social structure, urban and plantation life, slavery, the role of women, education, religion, fine arts, architecture and decorative arts.

337.01, 13260 TR 10:50-12:05  Coy

The Age of Reformation. An examination of the cultural, social, and political developments of the European Reformations. In this course, we will investigate recent historiography on the Reformation and major primary sources from the period in order to assess its most important preconditions, events, and consequences. Central questions of the course include: What caused the Reformation? How did it affect European society and culture? What has been its lasting significance?

348.01, 13830 MWF 10-10:50  Gigova

Everyday Communism. In this class we will read about, watch and discuss the experience of millions who lived in the Soviet zone of influence after WWII. We will trace the metamorphosis of communism from a 19th-century ideology to practical policies and their impact on East Europeans.  In the process we will explore topics as diverse as the party-state, terror, class lifestyles, women’s “double burden,” socialist fashion and consumption, youth culture and music, the appeal of the West, dissidence, revolution and systemic transition.

350.01, 13259 TR 10:50-12:05  Coates

ST: Portugal & its Global Empire 1415-1974. This course will examine the global Portuguese presence from 1400 until the revolution in 1974 and the end of the Portuguese Empire. Some of the major themes of the class will be: navigation, colonization, inter-action with colonized peoples, administration, resistance and independence.  The course will examine all regions of the former Empire in the Atlantic, Brazil, Africa, and Asia.

361.01, 13252 MWF 11-11:50  Carmichael

ST: Islam in Eastern Africa. This seminar focuses on Islamic history in Uganda, Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania, Ethiopia, Eritrea, and the Sudan.  We will investigate varied historical roles that Islam has played, particularly in contexts that impact on certain countries’ domestic and international relations today.  The issues about which we will read include: the spread of Islam, forms of Islamic religious practice, Muslim resistance to European colonialism, Christian/Muslim interactions, civil war, and religion-state associations. 

370.01, 13223 TR 9:25-10:40  Gerrish

ST: Ancient Alexandria: Pharaohs, Physicists, and Femme Fatales. While its founder, Alexander the Great, subdued the world through violent conquest, ancient Alexandria rose to prominence as an intellectual and economic superpower, and “conquered” the Mediterranean world by means of science, literature, and trade. This course explores the political, cultural, and intellectual history of Alexandria, beginning with its foundation by Alexander in 332/1 BCE and extending into the Roman period.